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ArtistIlluminum



Joined: 01/04/13
Posts: 3
Loc: Croatia
Recording the sound in the woods - help?
      #1040711 - 01/04/13 07:00 AM
This morning I had a proper fun time in the woods recording the birds and other sounds, but what keeps messing with my mind are the lower frequencies that my mic is catching! I have Proel LDF-410 mic. I do process the overall recording in Ableton by cutting these lower frequencies out so the record becomes usable in my music production, but is there a way to remove these lower frequencies?

Raw recording I am talking about



Please, let me know if you have any advice about how to get a better sound in the woods (perhaps noise reduction (I recorded with the light polyester material over the mic to reduce the wind noise but that seemed like a fail because it can still be heard lol) or any other advice that can help me get a better recording).

Don't hesitate to type in any critics because I take them as a way to learn from my mistakes


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BJG145



Joined: 06/08/05
Posts: 3396
Loc: Norwich UK
Re: Recording the sound in the woods - help? new [Re: ArtistIlluminum]
      #1040733 - 01/04/13 09:44 AM
For recording outside I thought you generally needed a dougal-type furry windshield to get rid of the rumbling noise as the wind blows across it. (For the recording you have, a high-pass filter should get rid of a lot of it.)

http://www.broad-horizon-nature.co.uk/windshield-comparison....




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Hugh RobjohnsAdministrator
SOS Technical Editor


Joined: 25/07/03
Posts: 21733
Loc: Worcestershire
Re: Recording the sound in the woods - help? new [Re: ArtistIlluminum]
      #1040735 - 01/04/13 10:01 AM
Handling and wind noise are the main problems in this kind of situation.

Directional mics are very prone to handling noise because of the relatively floppy way the diaphragm is suspended. The solution is either to switch to an omnidirectional mic, which has a much stiffer diaphragm mounting arrangement, or to invest in a good quality shock mount system. Rycote are the industry leaders in this respect.

The second issue is wind noise, and again, Rycote are the experts. You need to move the turbulent air as far away from the mic diaphragm as possible, as that means protecting the mic within an envelope of still air, which is why location sound recordists on film and TV shoots, use the 'blimps' around the mics, often with long-haired 'windjammers' to help take the energy out of disturbed air flows.

High-pass filtering the mic will obviously help to reduce some of the unwanted LF, but often the handling noise and wind turblence either cause the diaphragm to bottom out, or it generates so much LF content that the mic preamps overload or saturate, which damages the recording in a way that can't be fixed properly afterwards.

www.rycote.com

hugh

--------------------
Technical Editor, Sound On Sound


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ArtistIlluminum



Joined: 01/04/13
Posts: 3
Loc: Croatia
Re: Recording the sound in the woods - help? new [Re: ArtistIlluminum]
      #1040747 - 01/04/13 12:19 PM
Probably the biggest problem is: I don't have any more money as I spent all I had on what I have at the moment. Is there any other way to reduce noise? Would it help if I would make a certain "shield" out of some solid material to help protect the mic from wind? Is it able to get a furry windshield for my type of mic?

I use low-pass filter on this as that LF noise is horrible to hear in the tracks I'm producing.


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Hugh RobjohnsAdministrator
SOS Technical Editor


Joined: 25/07/03
Posts: 21733
Loc: Worcestershire
Re: Recording the sound in the woods - help? new [Re: ArtistIlluminum]
      #1040755 - 01/04/13 01:02 PM
Quote ArtistIlluminum:

Is there any other way to reduce noise?




Not really -- it should be reduced at source, which means a good shock-mount to reduce mechanical vibration, and a good windshield.

You can certainly contrive DIY versions of both, and I'm sure you'll find some ideas from a google search.

The shockmount should allow the mic to move relatively freely in the plane perpendiular to the mic's diaphragm. The windshield should enclose the largest possible volume of still air around the mic. Long haird fabrics can be useful in taking out turbulent movement.

H

--------------------
Technical Editor, Sound On Sound


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ArtistIlluminum



Joined: 01/04/13
Posts: 3
Loc: Croatia
Re: Recording the sound in the woods - help? new [Re: Hugh Robjohns]
      #1040794 - 01/04/13 06:53 PM
Thank you very much for your patience and help!


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