Main Forums >> Recording Techniques
        Print Thread

Pages: 1
Georgie



Joined: 03/09/08
Posts: 2
Loc: UK
M/S recording
      #1059913 - 30/07/13 02:38 PM
I'm recording M/S vocal using Rode NTk and SeX1R in conjunction with AN ART MPA2 which has a M/S matrix. My initial impression of recent recordings were very good however as I listen back, I now feel the recording hasn't captured a "full body vocal" as I had expected and P's and T's are more prevalent than I would like even though useing a pop sheild. I have since used Cubase 4's channel EQ in an attempt to enhance the recording but still don't think I'm recording well. Can anyone offer any suggestionf


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator     Back to top
The Elf
active member


Joined: 14/08/01
Posts: 9706
Loc: Sheffield, UK
Re: M/S recording new [Re: Georgie]
      #1059926 - 30/07/13 03:02 PM
I don't see much point in recording vocal M/S unless you're really wanting to capture the room too.

It could be that you're not liking the off-axis response of the side mic.

My advice is to throw away the side signal and concentrate on making the mid your ideal vocal sound.

--------------------
An Eagle for an Emperor, A Kestrel for a Knave.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator     Back to top
Georgie



Joined: 03/09/08
Posts: 2
Loc: UK
Re: M/S recording new [Re: The Elf]
      #1059971 - 30/07/13 06:24 PM
Thanks Elf, the thing is I want to experiment with the M/S technique to find alternatives to the way I have recorded in the past. In my previous vocal recordings using a single and occasionally a secondary mic, I have found the vocals to be clear but not focused to center. Using M/S, I have read that the vocal should be heard dead center of the stereo image.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator     Back to top
The Elf
active member


Joined: 14/08/01
Posts: 9706
Loc: Sheffield, UK
Re: M/S recording new [Re: Georgie]
      #1059983 - 30/07/13 08:08 PM
The point of M/S is to capture stereo width from the source signal - and that's not really going to happen from an essentially mono source such as a vocal.

You'd do better to experiment in M/S recording something that has plenty of natural width, such as a string quartet, vocal group, drum kit, or even an acoustic guitar.

--------------------
An Eagle for an Emperor, A Kestrel for a Knave.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator     Back to top
Bob Bickerton
active member


Joined: 20/12/02
Posts: 3196
Loc: Nelson, New Zealand
Re: M/S recording new [Re: Georgie]
      #1059997 - 30/07/13 09:21 PM
Yes, there's really no point in recording vocals in stereo and its distracting you from focussing on the best result from just one mic.

I'm not familiar with the r1, but assuming it has a standard ribbon response, this should give you the body (and plosives) you need (don't need)! The NTK wouldn't be my favourite mic. So maybe you need a mic better suited to your voice?

Bob

--------------------
www.bickerton.co.nz


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator     Back to top
Hugh RobjohnsAdministrator
SOS Technical Editor


Joined: 25/07/03
Posts: 22276
Loc: Worcestershire
Re: M/S recording new [Re: Georgie]
      #1060024 - 31/07/13 09:11 AM
Quote Georgie:

I'm recording M/S vocal using Rode NTk and SeX1R in conjunction with AN ART MPA2 which has a M/S matrix.




Why? The MS technique captures a stereo image, in this case the vocal in the centre and whatever your room sounds like at the edges. If your vocal performance is in a nice acoustic space that may be desirable, but I suspect that's not really what you want at all.

Quote:

I now feel the recording hasn't captured a "full body vocal" as I had expected and P's and T's are more prevalent than I would like even though useing a pop sheild.




That could be a combination of the Rode NTK and the way you have placed it. Why not ditch the MS technique here -- save it for something much more appropriate -- and try recording the vocals just with your ribbon mic. That should address the issues you are complaining about -- it will give more bottom end (largely because of its increased proximity effect) and reduce the level of the fricatives.

Also, don't be afraid to move the mic around in front of the performer - moving an inch or two to the side, or move it up to forehead height and tilt down, for example. Two inches in front of the mouth is rarely the best place to capture a natural, balanced vocal sound! Stick your ear there and you'll hear what I mean!

H

--------------------
Technical Editor, Sound On Sound


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator     Back to top
twotoedsloth



Joined: 26/01/08
Posts: 625
Re: M/S recording new [Re: Georgie]
      #1060109 - 31/07/13 05:55 PM
What type of music are you recording? I usually use M/S when recording classical or operatic voice.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator     Back to top
Pages: 1

Rate this thread

Jump to

Extra Information
0 registered and 12 anonymous users are browsing this forum.

Moderator:  David Etheridge, James Perrett, zenguitar, Martin Walker, Forum Admin, Hugh Robjohns, Zukan, Frank Eleveld, SOS News Editor,  
Forum Permissions
      You cannot start new topics
      You cannot reply to topics
      HTML is disabled
      UBBCode is enabled
Rating:
Thread views: 1729

December 2014
On sale now at main newsagents and bookstores (or buy direct from the
SOS Web Shop)
SOS current Print Magazine: click here for FULL Contents list
Click image for December 2014
DAW Tips from SOS

 

Home | Search | News | Current Issue | Tablet Mag | Articles | Forum | Blog | Subscribe | Shop | Readers Ads

Advertise | Information | Privacy Policy | Support | Login Help

 

Email: Contact SOS

Telephone: +44 (0)1954 789888

Fax: +44 (0)1954 789895

Registered Office: Media House, Trafalgar Way, Bar Hill, Cambridge, CB23 8SQ, United Kingdom.

Sound On Sound Ltd is registered in England and Wales.

Company number: 3015516 VAT number: GB 638 5307 26

         

All contents copyright © SOS Publications Group and/or its licensors, 1985-2014. All rights reserved.
The contents of this article are subject to worldwide copyright protection and reproduction in whole or part, whether mechanical or electronic, is expressly forbidden without the prior written consent of the Publishers. Great care has been taken to ensure accuracy in the preparation of this article but neither Sound On Sound Limited nor the publishers can be held responsible for its contents. The views expressed are those of the contributors and not necessarily those of the publishers.

Web site designed & maintained by PB Associates | SOS | Relative Media