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Mike Senior
SOS Mix Specialist


Joined: 08/08/03
Posts: 1398
Loc: Cambridge, UK
Jessie J: 'Price Tag'
      #915250 - 20/05/11 08:21 AM
One of the mix engineers I keep quite a close eye on is Serban Ghenea, and (as usual) several of his mixes have been bothering the charts recently. This is my favourite of the current crop, which is a masterclass in mixing for the mass market — by which I mean for cheap playback systems and low volumes. Even on small speakers it manages to retain a feeling of warmth to the low end, yet keeps the vocal clear and cutting, and offers real bite in the drum department. This is partly by virtue of the arrangement, of course, which might be why other more full-textured recent mixes from the same guy (such as Kesha’s ‘We R Who We R’ or Pink’s ‘Perfect’) feel less focused and powerful to my ears — and seem almost slightly ragged by comparison. It’s the old adage: the less you put into the production, the bigger each element sounds.

There’s more to it than that, though. Notice the tight leash on the extreme lows, for instance, which means that the balance of both bass and kick survives the switch from full-range monitors to small, single-driver speakers remarkably well. The highs, on the other hand are extended and fairly full-on, to keep things shiny-sounding even if your boombox is sitting behind the sofa. There’s also a small but significant peak in the vocal response around 4.5kHz (a hallmark of many Serban Ghenea mixes), ensuring that Jessie’s persona dominates the frequency region where human hearing is at its most sensitive, and which low-spec playback systems are therefore usually best suited to reproducing. Mono compatibility is excellent too, even though there’s a useful amount of spread in the stereo mix on account of widening effects (you can clearly hear such a vocal treatment in the stereo Sides signal during the verses and rap, for instance) and a few wider-panned, but musically inessential, synth and backing-vocal layers.

However, although this mix may well end up next to Gabrielle’s ‘Independence Day’ on my own reference CD, I’ll probably use just a section from early on in the track, because by the final choruses there are so many of those 4.5kHz-rich vocal layers blended together that the whole thing starts to get overly fatiguing for me, in a way that restricts how much I can comfortably turn up the playback volume.

Speaking of the vocals, there are a couple of specific things worth mentioning. Part of the reason why the backing track can be so full-sounding (for a radio single, at least) is that the vocals are pretty shy on low mid-range — Jessie’s melody and lyrics can remain clearly intelligible via their higher frequencies without taking up too much space in the mix and making the bass/drums sound small. Also, if you listen to the vocal’s chorusing effect in the stereo Sides signal, you’ll notice that it sounds like it’s lisping. While this could be a side-effect of the specific processor, I suspect that the effect send has actually been de-essed to reduce emphasis on the lead vocal’s sibilants — a significant concern with any vocal like this that’s so strong in the 3-6kHz region.

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A complete recording method based around the techniques of the world's most famous producers.


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Mike Senior
SOS Mix Specialist


Joined: 08/08/03
Posts: 1398
Loc: Cambridge, UK
Re: Jessie J: 'Price Tag' new [Re: Mike Senior]
      #915287 - 20/05/11 11:36 AM
I auditioned this one off the album CD. Credits from the sleeve are as follows:

Written by Jessica Cornish, Lukasz Gottwald, Claude Kelly Bobby Ray Simmons Jr.
Produced by Dr Luke
Engineered by Chris 'TEK' O'Ryan, Emily Wright, Sam Holland
Mixed by Serban Ghenea, John Hanes
Mastered by Tom Coyne

I can only assume that jessie J has some kind of star quality, given how many tracks on her debut record are mixed by Serban Ghenea, who must already be mightily busy just dealing with his existing A-list clients. Perhaps that's where John Hanes comes in, as I've noticed his name appearing more and more alongside Ghenea's in recent mixes. The mixing equivalent of a ghost writer? One can only speculate...

Just listening to it again, another couple of things spring to mind which are worth pointing out. The first is the snare reverb, which sounds to me like it's using some kind of nonlinear patch (or else a compressed sample with a truncated tail). You can hear it during the song's intro, but there's also another good opportunity to hear it just before the first chorus, at 0:42. I like what this reverb does for the mix, giving a sense of expanse (and some stereo width) to things without contributing masses of tail to muddy the texture. The subtle pad that arrives with the first chorus is also an interesting one. It's so fizzy that it's almost unpitched, and it fills out the chorus texture without making the arrangement any more complex, or distracting from the vocal line.

The second verse is also nicely judged, using the added vocal harmony, a hint of tambourine, and some slightly more extrovert guitar work to lift things up a little compared with verse 1, but without any danger of killing the chorus pay-off. (I also wonder how many people discovered that their speakers/headphones were the wrong way round at 1:30, when the panned 'to the left/right' vocal responses arrive! ) I love the backing drops during B.o.B's rapped verse too (at 2:25, 2:27, and 2:30), especially the last one, which delivers a clear 180ms of digital black -- something that's always something of a head-turner on the radio.

Last but not least, the addition of lush massed backing vocals for the second of the final choruses is pretty effective to my ear, and they make a nice way to end the record too. Speaking of the outro, there's a lot of subsonic gubbins coming off the vinyl-noise there. This isn't an uncommon characteristic of vinyl noise in samples, I've noticed, and although the low-end woofs don't really matter much here (given the lack of bass and drums), if you use vinyl noise layers for background texture in your own productions, it's not a bad idea to high-pass filter pretty drastically to maintain low-end clarity.

For more critiques of commercial productions, browse The Mix Review Index

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Recording Secrets for the Small Studio
A complete recording method based around the techniques of the world's most famous producers.

Edited by Jennifer Jones (25/07/11 10:25 AM)


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steve355



Joined: 02/03/07
Posts: 907
Loc: Stevenage, Herts
Re: Jessie J: 'Price Tag' new [Re: Mike Senior]
      #915592 - 22/05/11 08:12 PM

Question....

How are the vocals treated in the first bridge and chorus? Is the main vocal multi tracked, auto tuned & panned? Is there some kind of artificial doubling going on?


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Mike Senior
SOS Mix Specialist


Joined: 08/08/03
Posts: 1398
Loc: Cambridge, UK
Re: Jessie J: 'Price Tag' new [Re: steve355]
      #915661 - 23/05/11 10:11 AM
Quote steve355:


Question....
How are the vocals treated in the first bridge and chorus? Is the main vocal multi tracked, auto tuned & panned? Is there some kind of artificial doubling going on?




The bridge vocals seem to sound different to the chorus ones to me, and feel more heavily pitch-locked and thinned-out with effects. The chorus sound seems to me to be about wide-panning a primary L-R pair of lead vocals with the timing absolutely in sync to avoid flamming and intelligibility problems in mono. There appears to be some doubling of these parts going on, but it feels quite low in level, and may just be coming from less obvious notes in the harmony vocal parts. By keeping the leads fairly clear, it keeps them from being too homogenised, which retains the edginess in her vocal delivery. (The subtle vocal double-track in Smells Like Teen Spirit works like this too.) In terms of effects there's probably a certain amount of blending/widening being used, but it's so subtle you'd be pushed to pick out specifics, especially given no dry comparison track. There is almost certainly a quarter-note tempo delay in there, though, judging by the stereo Sides signal, although it seems to be pretty dull tonally, which will be why it doesn't make a huge conscious impact as an audible effect. It's more for vocal warmth/sustain purposes, I reckon.

I can only speculate from what I'm hearing, though. To be sure, you'd have to ask Mr Ghenea!

--------------------
Recording Secrets for the Small Studio
A complete recording method based around the techniques of the world's most famous producers.


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steve355



Joined: 02/03/07
Posts: 907
Loc: Stevenage, Herts
Re: Jessie J: 'Price Tag' new [Re: Mike Senior]
      #915680 - 23/05/11 01:12 PM

Yes thats kind of what I thought!!! That style of chorus vocal is very popular these days. It sounds like the backing arrangement is very sparse, and the vocal hook is just huge, without even many harmonies to detract from the message. I don't like it much, I just really wish I knew how to do it.

Hearing the backing without the vocal would be very illuminating too.

Perhaps Mr Ghenea would care to do an interview for SOS?!!


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onesecondglance



Joined: 02/01/08
Posts: 2140
Loc: Reading, UK
Re: Jessie J: 'Price Tag' new [Re: Mike Senior]
      #915682 - 23/05/11 01:29 PM
i've thought every time i've heard this that the drums sound quite "grungy" - like they're slightly distorted. in a good way.

am i just hearing things?

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