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sabletones



Joined: 07/03/11
Posts: 295
Loc: uk
file deletes and FAT32 system continuity new
      #995934 - 03/07/12 11:55 AM
Hi I use a fostex D2424LVmk11 as a back up recorder mainly. I use the option to save to a FAT32 formatted CF card, which i can pass to people who use DAW's for mixing etc.

the Fostex manual explains DAT file deletions are best done on Fostex unit and not on a computer...to maintain FAT system continuity.

I have had to make x2 programme deletions (x8 track/files and x2 track files)on computer as i was unsure of Fostex instructions on deleting in the recorder unit. I am still trying to get to grips with the latter.
For now, can someone briefly explain FAT 32 system continuity, how my computer can mess it up, and how it can result in slower read/write operations.

Do you think my x2 deletions have compromised the CF card much.

A few questions there but many thanks in advance.

steve


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sabletones



Joined: 07/03/11
Posts: 295
Loc: uk
Re: file deletes and FAT32 system continuity new [Re: sabletones]
      #995935 - 03/07/12 12:00 PM
Sorry...i meant to write....when saving a WAV file not a DAT...in case it makes a difference


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BJG145



Joined: 06/08/05
Posts: 3413
Loc: Norwich UK
Re: file deletes and FAT32 system continuity new [Re: sabletones]
      #995936 - 03/07/12 12:04 PM
Quote:

<Note on deleting a DAT file>: The unit can save a DAT file but cannot delete a DAT file. You can delete a DAT file from a personal computer. Do not delete the BACKUP storage folder (only delete a DAT file). Also note that, by deleting a file, the continuity of the FAT system is lost, which may result in slower data reading/writing speed. If you want to delete an individual program in a DAT file, load the DAT file to the unit and use the program delete function of the unit.




Sounds like they're talking about fragmentation -

http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/F/fragmentation.html

I shouldn't worry about it. I guess you could always defrag the drive if it starts to slow down noticeably.


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sabletones



Joined: 07/03/11
Posts: 295
Loc: uk
Re: file deletes and FAT32 system continuity new [Re: sabletones]
      #995943 - 03/07/12 12:22 PM
cheers for that
stops me worrying in the short term

steve


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Madman_Greg



Joined: 07/12/06
Posts: 729
Loc: The back of beyond
Re: file deletes and FAT32 system continuity [Re: sabletones]
      #996036 - 03/07/12 10:10 PM
I don't know your particular system so I'll reply from a logical and theoretical perspective

The file system will remain intact if you delete on your PC

But it is entirely possible that your system, stores a WAV (the recording) plus other files associated with the recording, say metadata files or files associated with effects settings or whatever.

When you used the delete function on your unit, it clean up all the files, if this is the case.

On your PC you just delete the WAV file.

The file system will be intact, but you will possibly have files that are orphaned from the original WAV file. Or there could be a parent file which points to the WAV and other meta data files associated with this recording.

Of course it depends on the design and how it is implemented. If it were me designing this the files would all have the same name but different identifiers, i.e. recording1.wav, recording1.dat etc... and be stored in relevant folder (WAV, DAT) with the parent file in the root direct directory.


Just my thoughts any way

--------------------
Madman_Greg


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DonBelfastDJs



Joined: 01/07/12
Posts: 17
Loc: Belfast, Northern Ireland
Re: file deletes and FAT32 system continuity new [Re: sabletones]
      #996422 - 05/07/12 11:28 PM
I think fragmentation is the answer - the reason being PCs can be lazy about deleting or formatting a disk - taking the easy route of deleting the information that tells the disk the data is there, but not actually removing the data (which is why you should have a hard disk formatted properly if there's ever been anything on it useful to identity thieves etc before selling or giving it away)

PCs can also keeps tabs on stuff that can be recovered, so it doesn't write over it in a sequential or efficient way - the most efficient use of the hard disk would be to keep data in sequence, but PCs don't do that, but your Fostex might by the sound of the manual's advice.


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