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lachha



Joined: 24/07/08
Posts: 18
Psychology: Monkey-at-a-typewriter-information-overload
      #1002430 - 08/08/12 10:28 PM
I can surf the internet all night lapping up arcane and useless information till the cows come home. The instant gratification of of it, but can I read more than a few paragraphs about a new vst before information overload, losing the plot, getting irritated and turned off.

Wikipedia has this about Reversal Psychology:
by "triggering" a reversal between states, we can change the meaning attributed to the situation. What seemed serious before, can suddenly feel exciting with the right change in situation or mindset.

Does anyone have any tips or tricks on this? And how do you get accurate vst envelopes for sound-designing percussion (only joking)


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Dynamic Mike



Joined: 31/12/06
Posts: 1969
Re: Psychology: Monkey-at-a-typewriter-information-overload new [Re: lachha]
      #1002439 - 09/08/12 12:18 AM
Print off the information you need to read. Next, and this is mission critical, turn off your PC. Now put the kettle on & find somewhere quiet.

Otherwise if you're anything like me, as soon as you read some new information in a pdf about a VST you feel an irresistable urge to fire up your DAW & try it. Of course I always intend to pick up where I left off, but in reality I might as well just delete the pdf & accept that I'll never realise the full potential of whatever I've just installed.

--------------------
Disclaimer: The views or opinions expressed above do not necessarily reflect those of the poster by the time you read this.


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shufflebeat



Joined: 09/12/07
Posts: 3188
Loc: Manchester, UK
Re: Psychology: Monkey-at-a-typewriter-information-overload new [Re: lachha]
      #1002443 - 09/08/12 01:58 AM
Wise words, Mike.

I'm reliably informed we have at least three levels of reading:

Scanning (for specific words or major points)
Skimming (to get an overall view)
In depth (reading like a big boy)

It would seem taking in diverse fragments of information encourages is to adopt the appropriate mental attitude for the task to the detriment of other skills. I sometimes find it difficult to approach any heavy reading head on, needing to read out loud like a beginner and pausing after every paragraph to check I've absorbed the idea until my butterfly brain catches up.

--------------------
Dear Mr God,
We called but you were out - B Dylan Deliveries (Intntl)


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Anonymous
Unregistered




Re: Psychology: Monkey-at-a-typewriter-information-overload new [Re: lachha]
      #1002447 - 09/08/12 06:30 AM
I think you can interest yourself in anything. I often sort of convince myself that I'm interested in the most tedious things just to get what I need done. But also, you actually do find that most things are pretty interesting, and that everything is related too.

For me, that is until I have a drink on a Friday night, and then I find it incomprehensible that I could possibly get interested in such things... "who was that nerd possessing me??!"

But that's good, to remember why you're actually bothered enough about such things: to make music. And I always want to make music!


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BJG145



Joined: 06/08/05
Posts: 3320
Loc: Norwich UK
Re: Psychology: Monkey-at-a-typewriter-information-overload new [Re: lachha]
      #1002458 - 09/08/12 07:36 AM
Yesterday I was listening to AS Byatt talking about her novel Possession, which is apparently stuffed to the gills with all kinds of fictitious extracts from Victorian poetry and letters. When she was challenged with the idea that most people wouldn't want to read all this guff she responded by saying that it was the reader's right to skip, that everyone skipped all the time in novels, and that she skipped loads of stuff when reading novels. I found that strange, coming from a novelist. I never skip when reading novels. But maybe that's why I often don't finish them.

Technical stuff is different. I mean, SOS for instance, I mainly just look at the pictures.


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tacitus



Joined: 04/02/08
Posts: 923
Re: Psychology: Monkey-at-a-typewriter-information-overload new [Re: lachha]
      #1002461 - 09/08/12 07:43 AM
Looking at the pictures is vital. You can't remember every word you read (well, I can't) and the pictures are an important clue to recalling where you read something quite important. Usually I can find something in a book by focusing on the book's print, layout, and illustrations, often to the point of knowing that the bit I want is in the top left hand corner next to the picture. It's not 100% reliable but is does work reasonably well for me.


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Anonymous
Unregistered




Re: Psychology: Monkey-at-a-typewriter-information-overload new [Re: lachha]
      #1002597 - 09/08/12 01:42 PM
It might depend on what a person's aptitudes or tendencies are too. I remember a friend saying he didn't have enough patience for life drawing. I'd never really associated life drawing with requiring patience because I always enjoyed it. (The first part is like a puzzle, where you plot the features (measure), then you slowly build it up.)

On the other hand, I remember him reading complete novels with ease (even ones he didn't like), whereas for me that requires patient concentration, unlike drawing, which is for me relaxing.

Reading is not a processs I enjoy. It baffles me how people would rather stare at a book on the beach, than observe the crashing waves and weird array of humanoids.


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lachha



Joined: 24/07/08
Posts: 18
Re: Psychology: Monkey-at-a-typewriter-information-overload new [Re: lachha]
      #1002653 - 09/08/12 08:47 PM
Thanks for your helpful comments: put the kettle on, look at the pictures and move your lips. I might try one of those text to speech gizmos if there are no videos available


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petev3.1



Joined: 11/05/10
Posts: 376
Re: Psychology: Monkey-at-a-typewriter-information-overload new [Re: lachha]
      #1003641 - 15/08/12 09:17 AM
The writer’s first courtesy, is it not to be brief

Anatole France
La Vie Littéraire (1888)

It is one of the oddest things in the world that you can read a page or more and think of something utterly different.

Christian Morgenstern
Aphorisms (1918)


The art of reading is to skip judiciously. Whole libraries may be skipped these days, when we have the results of them in our modern culture without going over the ground again. And even of the books we decide to read, there are almost always large portions which do not concern us, and which we are sure to forget the day after we have read them. The art is to skip all that does not concern us, while missing nothing that we really need. No external guidance can teach us this; for nobody but ourselves can guess what the needs of our intellect may be.

P. G. Hammerton
The Intellectual Life (1882)


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Folderol



Joined: 15/11/08
Posts: 3555
Loc: Rochester, UK
Re: Psychology: Monkey-at-a-typewriter-information-overload new [Re: petev3.1]
      #1003720 - 15/08/12 04:50 PM
Context is everything.

Quote petev3.1:

The writer’s first courtesy, is it not to be brief

Anatole France
La Vie Littéraire (1888)



"They met.
They had kids.
They grew old.
They died."

Not much of a romantic novel eh?

Quote:


It is one of the oddest things in the world that you can read a page or more and think of something utterly different.

Christian Morgenstern
Aphorisms (1918)



So were you actually reading at all?

Quote:


The art of reading is to skip judiciously. Whole libraries may be skipped these days, when we have the results of them in our modern culture without going over the ground again. And even of the books we decide to read, there are almost always large portions which do not concern us, and which we are sure to forget the day after we have read them. The art is to skip all that does not concern us, while missing nothing that we really need. No external guidance can teach us this; for nobody but ourselves can guess what the needs of our intellect may be.

P. G. Hammerton
The Intellectual Life (1882)



... and if the the work was directions for scenic drive you definitely don't want to skip the bit that says:

"Watch out for the sharp left hand turn just over the summit, as there is a 50ft drop."

--------------------
It wasn't me!
(Well, actually, it probably was)


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