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Digital Audio Restoration

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Digital Audio Restoration

Postby Fruitfly » Tue Nov 13, 2012 2:27 pm

I'm not sure if this is the right place to ask but does anyone know if there's any techniques or books on audio restoration:

Removing noises, crackle and clicks with Sonnox Restore.

I've been trying to search techniques and books with the sonnox restore or any other digital restoring plug ins.

I'm all out of luck,

anyone?

Cheers
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Re: Digital Audio Restoration

Postby James Perrett » Tue Nov 13, 2012 2:43 pm

The first place to look would be the documentation that came with the software. Adobe Audition comes with some reasonable help files for their restoration processing.

However, the secret to good audio restoration is to get the best transfer from analogue that you can. What are you restoring?

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Re: Digital Audio Restoration

Postby Fruitfly » Tue Nov 13, 2012 4:02 pm

Thanks James. I have already read the documents that come with it. I'm finding for techniques.

I'm restoring an analog audio piece by removing it's clicks, buzzes and noise from the Plugin Sonnox Restore.

Best transfer from analog? you mean AD conversion?

I already have the converted piece actually. I'm just removing the clicks, buzzes and noise.
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Re: Digital Audio Restoration

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Tue Nov 13, 2012 4:32 pm

There's some general overview, hints and tips in Bob Katz' Mastering Audio book (chapter 12), but like James I'd say the more detailed and useful stuff usually comes with the software. I've not used the Sonnox stuff, But Adobe Audition and Izotope RX Advanced both have very helpful educational stuff in their manuals.

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Re: Digital Audio Restoration

Postby Fruitfly » Wed Nov 14, 2012 7:49 am

I'll check out both audition and the RX.

and the mastering book helped. Thank a bunch
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Re: Digital Audio Restoration

Postby Dave Blackman » Wed Nov 14, 2012 12:34 pm

There are a few tutorials on the Cedar website that you might be able to adapt to what you're using - http://www.cedar-audio.com

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Re: Digital Audio Restoration

Postby James Perrett » Wed Nov 14, 2012 12:50 pm

Fruitfly wrote:
Best transfer from analog? you mean AD conversion?

No, before that you need to do things like use the right stylus for the job and check the tracking weight and geometry if you are transferring from vinyl, or check the azimuth and eq if you are transferring from tape.

If you've got those things right, the restoration software won't need to work so hard - in fact, in some cases you may not need it at all.

James.
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Re: Digital Audio Restoration

Postby Jeraldo » Wed Nov 14, 2012 3:09 pm

I use Rx2, and with that, and I suspect the other "restoration" packages, the key thing is practice and experience. I get much better with Rx2 every time I use it. For example, I just discovered (the now very obvious reason!) why one would choose 4000 bands when working with lower frequencies and as few as a several hundred for high frequencies in Spectral Repair. This sort of thing is not found in any support material, only comments such as "more bands do not necessarily produce a better result."

So, I would advise getting something and getting lots of practice with lots of different kinds of material and problems.

On another note, the latest version of Rx 2 (a couple or several months ago) seemed to have performance improvements that weren't documented. I'm finding broadband noise removal improved substantially, with the ability to make large reductions without any artifacts. Or perhaps I've finally learned how to optimize it. Declick may have been improved, too. Longer selections in the attenuate mode of spectral repair seem to work better as well. With a list like this, perhaps it's the user that's improved, not the software! But the broadband noise reduction does seem to be kicked up a notch.

The support/instructional material for Rx is a bit all over the place, with somewhat different material in the printable manual, on screen help, and the videos. A few portions of the printable manual are still very out of date. (Applicable to Rx1, not 2)

That aside, I'm more than happy with it! One of the most useful and cost effective things I've purchased.

Just my experience, I suspect the competitors are very good as well.

Practice......

Oh, one more thing: This is not necessarily useful, but may be interesting. I've only realized (also another obvious one!) that some of the "problems" we are correcting on LP's are actually problems originating from the original recording, and the tape medium and storage from which the LP was made! Perhaps it's more than restoration, it can be improving the source material as well. Whether changing or not an historical recording is an entirely situational decision.
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