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Getting that Cinematic sound

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Getting that Cinematic sound

Postby TheFuzz » Sun Nov 25, 2012 5:51 pm

Hi guys,
I haven't really tried anything like this before so perhaps you can help me out.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=smqucjnlvgc

This is a track that i want to cover or at least make something in the same style, the only problem is cathing that sound that i can on;y describe as being Cinematic.
One of the things that i really want to capture is the depth of that guitar, its confusing me a little... Its bassy but not to bassy and its still capturing the clarity well.

can any one help enlighten me on how they got it sounding like that?

Cheers, Connor
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Re: Getting that Cinematic sound

Postby Phil O » Sun Nov 25, 2012 6:30 pm

That's probably dropped tuning of some sort and, maybe even a Baritone guitar. Beyond that, use of multiple 'layered' takes, tight timing with the bass and copious amounts of compression should all combine to give the punchy sound you require.
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Re: Getting that Cinematic sound

Postby oggyb » Sun Nov 25, 2012 10:22 pm

Sounds like dropped tuning. Very tight compression and multitracked parts too.

Tbh that's nowhere near a cinematic mix, if that's indeed what you mean. Nowhere near clear enough in the bass and cluttered in the mids. It's too bombastic.
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Re: Getting that Cinematic sound

Postby TheFuzz » Sun Nov 25, 2012 10:51 pm

Hi i do realise this is a drop tuning, but the sound im trying to achieve is the punch that the guitar brings with it, and while its not a true cinematic sound, when listened to through decent headphones you can really feel how the layers mix together to give rich and 'epic' sound.

im wondering if anyone has any ideas on how to achieve that sort of sound.
e.g. clever panning, reverb in certain places.
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Re: Getting that Cinematic sound

Postby DC-Choppah » Sun Nov 25, 2012 11:13 pm

Use the Haas effect on your guitar tracks too. pretty standard trick I think to get that wide, cinematic guitar sound.
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Re: Getting that Cinematic sound

Postby TheFuzz » Mon Nov 26, 2012 11:38 am

never heard of that?

Could you explain it a bit more please?
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Re: Getting that Cinematic sound

Postby Nicky T » Mon Nov 26, 2012 1:21 pm

Haas effect introduces subtle phase shifts (minute delays between left and right signal) to make a sound it appear as a wider stereo image than the original material. You can achieve it with things like a stereo widener plugin or in hardware terms. On hardware the best device I ever used for this, if you are lucky enough to own/afford one/can find one is the TC1210 chorus/spatial expander. The Neve 8816 summing mixer also has a stereo width control that can achieve similar results. The other way you can do it is to split the stereo signal into 2 monos and put them out of phase to each other but beware this will affect the mono mix considerably. Hope that helps.
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Re: Getting that Cinematic sound

Postby Billum » Mon Nov 26, 2012 1:50 pm

Easiest way to achieve the Haas effect in a DAW is simply to pan a guitar (or any instrument - although percussion tends not to work particularly well) to the extreme left or right, and then feed it simultaneously to the opposite channel through a short delay, around 10-30mS. If you do this with two guitars, panned to opposite channels, and each feeding their opposite channel through that short delay, you can quickly achieve a super-large guitar sound, with much better mono compatibility than a phase reversal (phase reversal cancels out completely when mono'd, and also doesn't sound as good as a proper Haas delay effect).

The point of this is that below around 30mS, the brain doesn't hear the delayed signal as separate from the original signal, but gives the instrument an amazing sense of size and width.

Experiment with the levels of the delayed signal to taste - sometimes these can even be set to be technically louder than the original signal, but are still not perceived as a separate signal, with the original sound still being the only sound consciously perceived, but in a very big way!

Have lots of fun!
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Re: Getting that Cinematic sound

Postby TheFuzz » Mon Nov 26, 2012 2:00 pm

Ahhh great, just found a really usefull video on that.
Cheers guys, i'll have a bit of an experiment with that, it really does make a much fuller sound.
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Re: Getting that Cinematic sound

Postby sdRissdR » Mon Nov 26, 2012 2:07 pm

Good mix between the Bass and the guitars to have this depth and low-mid end, plus big low tight kick to give the punch on the attacks !
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Re: Getting that Cinematic sound

Postby Vantre » Tue Nov 27, 2012 12:45 am

A few other points that don't seem to have been mentioned much so far....

Don't overly focus on the guitar sound in isolation - what makes the guitar sound so big is in large part where it sits in the overall mix. So don't try to get the "right" guitar sound and then move on to the overall mix as that'll completely change it. Work on the guitar sound in the context of the bass and kick in particular.

EQ is your friend. The bass will probably be providing quite a lot of what you'll perceive to be the chunky part of the guitar here. The biggest difficulty (imo) with this sort of sound isn't getting the right individual sounds, but it's having them not mask each other. So you'll need to carve out the sweet spots for kick, bass and guitar so they enhance each other.

To help with that, you might want to layer the kick. It can be handy to use more than one sample here to accentuate the attack of it (or layer a sample over the kit if you're using acoustic drums)

And feel free to go wild with the guitar layers - throw in several and that can help to fatten up the sound (you can play with different EQs and panning for the various layers). If you've got access to guitar amp plug-ins that you can apply to a clean signal of the guitar part, that'll give you a lot of flexibility to experiment!

I'd also guess that this track has had the [email]cr@p[/email] compressed out of it, so that might be something else to do at the end of the mix to give it that extra "cinematic" feel. If you want to make your ears hurt
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