You are here

Marshall JCM 2000 DSL 50

All about the tools and techniques involved in capturing sound, in the studio or on location.

Marshall JCM 2000 DSL 50

Postby WarKites » Thu Jan 31, 2013 2:13 pm

Hey, this is my first post on this forum. Just wanted to launch a post about the best sound for this amp!

My band (We Built A Skyscraper) are heading into Univibe Studios in Birmingham soon to start recording our first single, I was just wondering if anyone had any input for decent recording setting for the DSL?

The equipment I use is:

Fender Telecaster, American
Marshall JCM 2000 DSL 50

Boss TU-2 Chromatic Tuner
Flashback X4 Delay
T-Rex Comp Nova compressor
Electro Harmonix Little Big Muff
Boss GE-7 Graphic Equalizer


As well as this our other guitarist uses a Gibson Les Paul Studio, but we'll both use the DSL.

We might record some things at home too, I have an Audio Technica 4033 if anyone has any advice on recording the DSL with that too?

Thanks a lot!
WarKites
Poster
Posts: 47
Joined: Thu Jan 31, 2013 12:00 am
http://www.facebook.com/WarKites
4 Piece indie band from Birmingham, UK.

Re: Marshall JCM 2000 DSL 50

Postby Jack Ruston » Thu Jan 31, 2013 2:26 pm

It's not really for us to tell you. It will depend on what your band sounds like, how hot the pickups in your guitars are, what mics are used etc. Set it how it sounds good to you in the room, bearing in mind that it will be brighter right in front of the cone. Have a listen in the control room and tweak the amp if you need to. Some will say use less gain than you normally would. That's often a valid way to go, but ultimately if you're a really high gain sort of band, then you need a high gain sort of sound.

This all said...There's a late 70's 100w JMP at that studio, according to their website. If it's a nice one, and you're going for that Les Paul/Marshall Slash sort of a sound, it will most likely be nicer than the DSL. Those JMPs were basically JCM800 circuits before the JCM800 came out, and they can be extremely good. The transformers are better sounding than anything available to Marshall today. But it might not be such a great one...A lot of those things have been heavily messed around with over the years. Try it.

I'd also advise you to try separating your sounds a little between the two of you. You can try the AC30 for the other guitar perhaps. OR try the JMP on one and the DSL on the other. Maybe one guitar slightly lower gain.

Ultimately you need to work with your engineer to get a sound that YOU like. Make a choice on the day and stick with it.

You can not change the sounds you record very much. You can bring out a bit of midrange or clean up the bottom end but ultimately what you hear when you track is more or less what you will hear on your record. Don't imagine that it will change much. If you're not hearing something you like when the red light goes on, stop and work on it. There's nothing wrong with spending far more time working on getting a sound than on actually recording it if you're good players.

J
Jack Ruston
Frequent Poster
Posts: 3478
Joined: Wed Dec 21, 2005 12:00 am

Re: Marshall JCM 2000 DSL 50

Postby Jack Ruston » Thu Jan 31, 2013 2:28 pm

One other thing...Those 100w 70's marshalls in their sweet spot are LOUD. If you're tracking the guitars in the room with the drum kit you might find it extremely difficult to get separation because they come up much louder than....anthing.

J
Jack Ruston
Frequent Poster
Posts: 3478
Joined: Wed Dec 21, 2005 12:00 am

Re: Marshall JCM 2000 DSL 50

Postby WarKites » Thu Jan 31, 2013 2:36 pm

Thanks for the advice!

Sorry if I wasn't very clear before, ideally I'd like to find a sound using distortion, but not too much, more of a crunch really. I've tried using the clean channel on the DSL with the crunch on, but although it sounds great when it's on its own, in the mix it just sounds clean.

I probably wouldn't got for the Les Paul/Marshall sound though, I like it to be a bit more modern, perhaps a bit like the lead guitar in this... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0MRAc9-Q9C0

Our other guitarist was considering using the Mesa boogie Rectifier, he likes it to be a bit fuzzier, rather than straight up distortion.

Again, thanks for the advice, I'll take it into account when we go in!
WarKites
Poster
Posts: 47
Joined: Thu Jan 31, 2013 12:00 am
http://www.facebook.com/WarKites
4 Piece indie band from Birmingham, UK.

Re: Marshall JCM 2000 DSL 50

Postby WarKites » Thu Jan 31, 2013 2:37 pm

Just a quick add on, we'd be recording parts separately rather than all at once in a live room!
WarKites
Poster
Posts: 47
Joined: Thu Jan 31, 2013 12:00 am
http://www.facebook.com/WarKites
4 Piece indie band from Birmingham, UK.

Re: Marshall JCM 2000 DSL 50

Postby Jack Ruston » Thu Jan 31, 2013 2:41 pm

Well, I'd definitely try the JMP for the crunch thing. Just play around with the balance of preamp and master vol to get the sort of thing you're after. I think it'll have more presence in the mix than the DSL. Try your big muff into the AC30 for the fuzzier sound. The Boogies are good for metal stuff but they have a habit of being a bit fizzy vs a marshall. Try everything.

J
Jack Ruston
Frequent Poster
Posts: 3478
Joined: Wed Dec 21, 2005 12:00 am

Re: Marshall JCM 2000 DSL 50

Postby Andi » Thu Jan 31, 2013 5:51 pm

...probably worth a chat with the RE on the day too - as you don't appear to have a fully developed version of "your" sound and (s)he will (or should) have a good idea of how the sound will translate across their gear.

Best of luck.

A.
User avatar
Andi
Frequent Poster
Posts: 656
Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 11:00 pm
Andi, www.thedustbowlaudio.com Mixing, Mastering, Audio Editing (and articles) at The Dustbowl Audio

Re: Marshall JCM 2000 DSL 50

Postby tomdot » Thu Jan 31, 2013 6:54 pm

I have used Univibe a lot over the past couple of years. Joel is a real stand up bloke and he runs a great studio. That being said, and knowing that studio, here is my advice.

Leave the amp at home and use the mountains of gear that Joel knows how to get a sound out of. I used to play Fenders and for my record ended up using his Orange Tiny Terror through a Marshall 4x12. If I didn't want that, then I could have used his JCM, or his Vox, or any of the other 5 or 6 amps there, through any of his speaker cabs!

Don't sweat the sound before you get in, though it's good you're taking the time to think about this kind of thing.
tomdot
Regular
Posts: 205
Joined: Thu Jan 05, 2012 12:00 am

Re: Marshall JCM 2000 DSL 50

Postby WarKites » Thu Jan 31, 2013 9:15 pm

That's great because we'll be recording with Joel when we go!

I had the intention of leaving my amp at home anyway, I've seen a couple of amps that they have from their Facebook page and website, I thought they had a DSL 50. But thanks for the advice about going in there with an open mind, and the heads up about the gear!
WarKites
Poster
Posts: 47
Joined: Thu Jan 31, 2013 12:00 am
http://www.facebook.com/WarKites
4 Piece indie band from Birmingham, UK.

Re: Marshall JCM 2000 DSL 50

Postby tomdot » Fri Feb 01, 2013 8:20 am

With a clear hear I forgot a few things last night, so bear with...

I reckon it would be a good idea to take your pedalboard because sometimes it's much better to set your sound through the floor rather than relying on plugins etc. If the engineer can replicate it then all the better, and it leaves him more options at the mix.

A few basic pieces of advice though if you don't already know - make sure that all guitarists (and bass!) strap on some fresh strings the day before and stretch them in! During the session its also a good idea to all use the same tuning reference due to the slight inconsistencies from tuner to tuner - you've got the best tuner anyway so everyone use that!

Also, if your drummer does not know how to play to a click you may struggle - it's very difficult for a drummer to suddenly have to keep time to an external source. If you have a drum machine or click box of some description then spend a couple of rehearsals with the drummer learning to keep time to it, rather than blasting through your set.

Finally, you mentioned about recording extra pieces. In my view this isn't going to be a great idea when you're paying for studio time where the experts can do a much better job. If you know the tempos of your tracks already then it may be a good idea to record a DI signal using the guitar or Hi-Z input into your computer. That way you can take all of the DI tracks to the studio and re-amp them - all the rock, none of the fuss, and you get to spend more time recording things that really benefit from studio time such as drums and vocals. Though, if you don't yet know what tempo your songs are at, just wait to get to the studio.

Slightly OT (I promise I'll shut up in a bit), the last time I spoke to Joel it wasn't a great situation. I felt very bad for him because our record label didn't pay him (meaning we had to eventually shell out), they didn't pay our producer either so he stopped turning up leaving Joel to run the sessions, and between our management and the rest of the band they ended up rejecting his mixes. I felt that was very unfair because while he didn't do a perfect job, he certainly deserved the chance to make revisions. The way he conducted himself during all this was pretty classy and didn't seem to affect him on the surface. This was one of the many reasons I ended up leaving the industry for a couple of years.

If you want to DM me about anything at all then feel free - I might have gotten to the level that you aspire to, and especially in Birmingham I might be able to give you some advice. I don't have any contacts any more mind, and the gig venues have completely changed over the past couple of years - but all of that is definitely another story.

Good luck!
tomdot
Regular
Posts: 205
Joined: Thu Jan 05, 2012 12:00 am


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Goddard and 1 guest