You are here

Buying Monitors for Home Studio

For everything after the recording stage: hardware/software and how you use it.

Buying Monitors for Home Studio

Postby Big Kahuna » Mon Jun 23, 2014 4:13 pm

Hi,

I'm slowly working on putting together a home studio so that I can do better post-production sound work on my films. Currently I'm only planning to mix in stereo, as I've never done 5.1 mixes before and I can only really afford two speakers anyway. While I understand room treatment will be a major part of the process (and I'm slowly working on it), I've been looking around the internet for a while trying to figure out what kind of monitors are best suited to post-production film work. While the Genelec 8030a and JBL LSR4326P monitors appear to be out of my price range, I've been looking at the Yamaha HS8 speakers and they look quite good. Has anyone used the Yamaha HS8 speakers for film work before and, if so, how well did they work?

Cheers,
Stephen
Big Kahuna
Poster
Posts: 18
Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2012 12:00 am

Re: Buying Monitors for Home Studio

Postby G-Doubleyou » Mon Jun 23, 2014 4:24 pm

Big Kahuna wrote:Hi,

I'm slowly working on putting together a home studio so that I can do better post-production sound work on my films. Currently I'm only planning to mix in stereo, as I've never done 5.1 mixes before and I can only really afford two speakers anyway. While I understand room treatment will be a major part of the process (and I'm slowly working on it), I've been looking around the internet for a while trying to figure out what kind of monitors are best suited to post-production film work. While the Genelec 8030a and JBL LSR4326P monitors appear to be out of my price range, I've been looking at the Yamaha HS8 speakers and they look quite good. Has anyone used the Yamaha HS8 speakers for film work before and, if so, how well did they work?

Cheers,
Stephen

It's best to be able to compare in a good space.

Fix you budget look around for Used monitors, you may be able to find higher speced models for the same money.

User avatar
G-Doubleyou
Frequent Poster
Posts: 879
Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2006 12:00 am

G-Dub Studio G-fx 15inch quad-core i7 Macbook Pro Logic9.1.8, LPX 10.0.3


Re: Buying Monitors for Home Studio

Postby ConcertinaChap » Mon Jun 23, 2014 5:48 pm

G-Doubleyou wrote:Fix you budget look around for Used monitors, you may be able to find higher speced models for the same money.


Agree. My Genelec 8030a's cost me 500 quid for the pair secondhand and are in fine nick. I'm very happy with them.

CC
User avatar
ConcertinaChap
Frequent Poster
Posts: 3488
Joined: Tue Jul 19, 2005 11:00 pm
Location: Bradford on Avon

Making music: Eagle Alley ... Recording music: Mr Punch's Studio  


Re: Buying Monitors for Home Studio

Postby JonathanRace » Tue Jun 24, 2014 5:03 am

Another +1 for the used market, much more bang for your buck!
JonathanRace
Regular
Posts: 50
Joined: Sat Jun 21, 2014 11:00 pm

Re: Buying Monitors for Home Studio

Postby SafeandSound Mastering » Wed Jun 25, 2014 9:40 am

I recommend hearing monitors prior to spending a lot of money, that is critical. Second hand thats probably not going to happen and you could end up with something that is not suitable for one reason or another. At least listen to them in store then weigh up the pros and cons of not having a warranty before making a rash decision. (a 5 year warranty is a valuable thing to any serious small business)

I would have a look around some post production studios and see what they are using and narrow it down. Don't forget the secondary "mix cube" type speaker.
User avatar
SafeandSound Mastering
Frequent Poster
Posts: 1027
Joined: Sun Mar 23, 2008 12:00 am
Location: London UK

Re: Buying Monitors for Home Studio

Postby Tim Keep » Wed Jun 25, 2014 12:39 pm

Some good advice.

You will kick yourself if you find out late what it is to make music on a good pair of headphones with a good headphone amp.

If you have a less the ideal space or a space where you feel unable to work at a volume where you able to feel the vibe then you need some good headphones. You still need the monitors, you can beat checking your mix on some. You'll find yourself correcting reverbs and EQs from whats coming out of the monitors but the bulk of what you'll do will be done in your cans.

So,

First check out a good audio interface with a good headphone amp.

The TC Electronic range.
RME
M-Box 3s
SPL Crimson
The Audient id22.

I tried the Focusrite ranges but I found their headphone amps to be shockingly bad. Steer clear of everything else on the market and the Focusrite.


After that you're looking for Cans.


I've used the same pair of Sennheiser HD650s for 10 years. If you're worried about the price then that's about £30.00 a year. Regardless of the using them for mixing, I've had more pleasure listening to music through those than you'll get from going to a pub a night for 1 night a year a thousand times over.

I now live in a tropical country and suffer from noise from air conditioning so I've just invested in the Sennheiser HD380 Pro's. They took 48 hours of techno blaring through them to loosen up. They now sound fantastic, and they have 32dB of isolation from the environmental noise. They're currently £75 on Amazon - A COMPLETE AND UTTER BARGAIN. They're also the right sort impedance (48Ω) to run off your standard iPod. So you'll be able to travel with your mixing headphones which brings fresh ears home to your computer also.

The 380s don't tell you about the really high frequencies quite as well as other headphones do. They have a slightly enhanced 2k region but that's similar territory to the NS10. The upshot is its really easy to define sound staging in that all important frequency. They are a fantastic set of headphones and a capable place to mix music on.

So do yourself and favour and factor in that purchase with your 'studio' set-up.

Speakers.

Well I'm now using a little pair of Presonus E5s which are very honest and I'm quite happy with them. Especially as I can sort the sub in the HD380s, I do use the Presonus for mixing and checking and understanding that translation from cans to speakers.

Game Changer - I have mine on concrete blocks.

Forget putting them on a desk, go buy (for £12.00) 6x 7.3Nm (Newton meter) concrete blocks (440x220x220mm) from your local builders merchants and stack them on your floor and never worry about speaker stands again.

Image

So finally,

I am eventually going to upgrade the speakers but its after thought. Check out the Equator D8s as I think they look pretty good value for money for audiophiles. You might want to look into them for your first time buy.

Hope that helps.

Tk
Tim Keep
Poster
Posts: 35
Joined: Sun Apr 13, 2003 11:00 pm
Location: Zhongli, Taiwan

Music Lover www.elo3n.com


Re: Buying Monitors for Home Studio

Postby Big Kahuna » Wed Jun 25, 2014 12:50 pm

Thanks for the advice, I've been mixing on AKG K141 headphones for the last few years and I'm very happy with the results. However, now I've got more space I'm thinking about expanding a bit and trying to make an actual home studio.

After following the advice of getting second-hand speakers from some of the other responses, I found a great deal on a pair of Genelec 8030a speakers and I've bought those. I've been doing most of my mixes on those at University, and I really like the sound of them.

Concrete blocks sound like a really good tip, because I'm still trying to figure out whether I should put the speakers on my desk or pay for some fancy speaker stands.
Big Kahuna
Poster
Posts: 18
Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2012 12:00 am

Re: Buying Monitors for Home Studio

Postby ConcertinaChap » Wed Jun 25, 2014 3:11 pm

Big Kahuna wrote:After following the advice of getting second-hand speakers from some of the other responses, I found a great deal on a pair of Genelec 8030a speakers and I've bought those. I've been doing most of my mixes on those at University, and I really like the sound of them.


Nice one. As I say, I'm very happy with mine and you're already well listened-in on them.

Big Kahuna wrote:I'm still trying to figure out whether I should put the speakers on my desk or pay for some fancy speaker stands.


I've got mine on my desk but standing on bricks. Combined with the isopods that works well.

The earlier point about buying second hand leading to poor choices because you can't audition first has some validity, but is easy to handle. Buying second hand over years has been fundamental to the way I built my setup, and the reason is that anything you buy you can also sell, and when you sell second hand goods you probably won't lose much on the transaction and may even gain. I've bought and sold my way through quite a bit of kit over the years, learned about each piece when I had it then decided to keep it or sell it on. I worked my way gradually from a completely non-computer-based environment to one completely in the box, and I know and feel comfortable with why I did it. I strongly recommend it as an approach.

CC
User avatar
ConcertinaChap
Frequent Poster
Posts: 3488
Joined: Tue Jul 19, 2005 11:00 pm
Location: Bradford on Avon

Making music: Eagle Alley ... Recording music: Mr Punch's Studio  



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: blinddrew and 4 guests