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Lavalier Microphones for singers, sopranos

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Lavalier Microphones for singers, sopranos

Postby kapaw » Mon Oct 10, 2011 8:28 pm

Woorking with teartet, I often run into some great singers. Therefore, it is sometimes a bit of a shame not to give them a decent microphone, especially the sopranos.
Because it must be a Lavalier Microphone that can be hidden.
Does anyone out there who have good experiences with some good mics. There are more suitable, than the standard leavline mic.
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Re: Lavalier Microphones for singers, sopranos

Postby seablade » Mon Oct 10, 2011 9:47 pm

kapaw wrote:Woorking with teartet, I often run into some great singers. Therefore, it is sometimes a bit of a shame not to give them a decent microphone, especially the sopranos.
Because it must be a Lavalier Microphone that can be hidden.
Does anyone out there who have good experiences with some good mics. There are more suitable, than the standard leavline mic.

Look into lavs for theater use and their mounting positions. Pretty standard stuff in my world;)

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Re: Lavalier Microphones for singers, sopranos

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Tue Oct 11, 2011 10:52 am

DPA lavaliers are generally recognised as amongst the best, and Sennheiser make some very good ones that are appropriate to your situation too.

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Re: Lavalier Microphones for singers, sopranos

Postby seablade » Tue Oct 11, 2011 11:26 am

Hugh Robjohns wrote:DPA lavaliers are generally recognised as amongst the best, and Sennheiser make some very good ones that are appropriate to your situation too.

hugh

Now that I am not typing on my cell phone...

DPA do generally get considered the best, but in as far as Sennheiser, well it becomes much more a matter of personal preference between them and Countryman. Honestly I see more B3s in use than MKEs and I have a personal preference for the Countryman mics. In all cases we are using omni-directional mics to help with things like wind noise into the mic and proximity effect.

The thing is, and what I alluded to in my post above, is that it isn't just the mic that makes a difference but also the mounting position. The actual chest mounted lav is a last resort in theater for many reasons. We tend to use one of two positions. The first is right at the top of the forehead at the hairline. This provides the most natural sound in most cases and is typically the first position we go to in theater for this reason and because it is still very easily hidden to almost invisible if you take time to match the cable etc. to the hair and skin color of the performer. The second position is right above the ear following the cheekbone. Not quite as nice a pickup as the top of the forehead, and not quite as well hidden, but if your performer is bald for instance, it might be a necessity. Either of these positions however will be much more natural of a sound than the chest mounted lav.

Of course when you get into miking like this you also can have other issues you should learn about and be prepared for, like sweat outs etc. But this should give you a nice starting point.

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