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Cubase: Vocal Delay Treatments

Cubase Tips & Techniques
Published December 2016
By John Walden

MonoDelay with the side-chain input activated. The second send is routed to the MonoDelay side-chain input to create a  ducked delay effect.MonoDelay with the side-chain input activated. The second send is routed to the MonoDelay side-chain input to create a ducked delay effect.

Are delays suffocating your vocal parts? Cubase has the answers!

In pretty much any song-based production, the vocals take centre stage, and while a well-recorded killer vocal performance is a great start you can often enhance it. Reverb and delay treatments, or a combination of both, can be part of that, but reverb often seems to move sounds ‘back’ in a busy mix, and in many contemporary styles, especially pop and EDM, the vocals need to remain up front if they’re to stand a chance of competing with everything else. Judicious use of delays can help you here, so let’s consider how you might best use Cubase’s bundled delays to add a little space and spice to your vocals,...

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Published December 2016