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Panning in Drum and Bass and other electronic genres

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Panning in Drum and Bass and other electronic genres

Postby stefz » Sun May 04, 2008 4:08 am

I'm trying to gather as much info as possible.

If dance music comes through a club system mono, then what benefits do a balanced panning mix have?
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Re: Panning in Drum and Bass and other electronic genres

Postby Bossman » Sun May 04, 2008 1:13 pm

people dont just listen to drum & bass in clubs y'know... a lot of people listen at home (on stereos), in cars, on headphones... etc, etc

also, not all club systems are mono!!
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Re: Panning in Drum and Bass and other electronic genres

Postby _.jk._ » Sun May 04, 2008 1:17 pm

Actually there are a variety of clubs that have drum and bass nights, especially at universities

James
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Re: Panning in Drum and Bass and other electronic genres

Postby DUBIX » Sun May 04, 2008 1:45 pm

It is worth panning in D&B. If nothing else, to create some space. This will still transfer to a mono mix if done properly.
In a stereo mix, the best thing to do is not to pan sounds hard left and hard right. I try and keep things between 10 and 2. TBH the things that people will dance to are the kick, snare, bass and any lead sound which you would probably keep in the middle anyway.

People don't just listen to D&B in clubs but the fact of the matter is, its dance music and its intended for clubs so D&B producers first and foremost need to address that in their mix.

I know what you mean about the club thing, most of the little raves have crap mono systems and it can be difficult to get your music to sound right. When I'm passing tunes around to DJs ill do a club specific mono mix and brickwall it. When I'm giving tunes to websites or people playing on radio, ill give the stereo mix which has more dynamics.

Hope this helps
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Re: Panning in Drum and Bass and other electronic genres

Postby stefz » Sun May 04, 2008 2:37 pm

Yeah i understand that people listen to the music outside of the club. however if they dont here it at the club their probably not going to listen to it at all.

Most club systems are mono.

Dub thanks for the info.

Most of the elements that i pan are hhats, shakers, cymbals ad some other percusive elements. any break elements(sampled breaks or chopped up bits), kick, snare are dead center.

Any experts with some words of wisdom?
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Re: Panning in Drum and Bass and other electronic genres

Postby Guest » Sun May 04, 2008 2:38 pm

Agree with all above, stereo is the way forward...
But i would recomend making sure Bass is Mono and Drums are even. this way it will transfer to most systems effectively.
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Re: Panning in Drum and Bass and other electronic genres

Postby Guest » Sun May 04, 2008 2:46 pm

i was too slow....

quite a lot of clubs are now stereo but for effective club tracks the key floor shakers need to be Monoish anyway. ie. Drums, bass and hooks. They will come across then on whatever system...
Stereo should not be discounted, pads and builds can benefit from panning esp if you split elements of sounds and pan them maintaining balence on other side.

also if you are aiming for eventual pressing onto vinyl remember the grooves dont like too much width!
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Re: Panning in Drum and Bass and other electronic genres

Postby thescientist » Sun May 04, 2008 3:17 pm

Even though this question doesn't pertain to electronic music (I'm learning to record rock and roll), I have a question about panning in stereo vs. mono. I am doing some recording right now and have ideas for panning certain instruments to different sides to help give more room and space for all the parts. Along with some careful frequency slotting, I think the mixes are sounding nice and every instrument is getting the right amount of "space" in the mix, or at least I think so anyway. With this in mind, I moniter and record certain parts (drums, some electric guitars) in stereo but had a question based on the topic of this thread.

If I pan all my instruments with stereo perspective in mind, what can I expect from this being played back on a mono system? I'm kinda unsure what to expect if I mix this way relative to how a stereo mix will sound when played back through a mono system. I know a mono mix (everything panned in the center?) played back in stereo would just be the same mono signal sent to both speakers, right? Thanks for any help, sorry of it is off-topic, figured it would be easier to do in here than in a new thread.
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Re: Panning in Drum and Bass and other electronic genres

Postby chris... » Sun May 04, 2008 3:37 pm

Kempo wrote:Actually there are a variety of clubs that have drum and bass nights, especially at universities

James


True. But that relates to this thread how ?

(sorry if I'm missing something obvious!)
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Re: Panning in Drum and Bass and other electronic genres

Postby _.jk._ » Sun May 04, 2008 3:40 pm

My mistake, I happened to miss that it says people dont _just_ listen to drum and bass in clubs!

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Re: Panning in Drum and Bass and other electronic genres

Postby DUBIX » Sun May 04, 2008 3:40 pm

thescientist wrote:Even though this question doesn't pertain to electronic music (I'm learning to record rock and roll), I have a question about panning in stereo vs. mono. I am doing some recording right now and have ideas for panning certain instruments to different sides to help give more room and space for all the parts. Along with some careful frequency slotting, I think the mixes are sounding nice and every instrument is getting the right amount of "space" in the mix, or at least I think so anyway. With this in mind, I moniter and record certain parts (drums, some electric guitars) in stereo but had a question based on the topic of this thread.

If I pan all my instruments with stereo perspective in mind, what can I expect from this being played back on a mono system? I'm kinda unsure what to expect if I mix this way relative to how a stereo mix will sound when played back through a mono system. I know a mono mix (everything panned in the center?) played back in stereo would just be the same mono signal sent to both speakers, right? Thanks for any help, sorry of it is off-topic, figured it would be easier to do in here than in a new thread.

You will still get some of the effect of stereo when you put your mix in mono. But you need to check that you don't lose anything.

I have a monitor controller which has a mono button so i check it on there, most desks have this as well. Its probably to have a true mono reference to check it properly though.

I once read an interview with Don Smith who said he pans in mono! This sounds crazy but I tried it and it does work. He said if you monitor in mono and move a sound around until it sits or stands out nicely. When you put the mix back into stereo, the panning is much more effective. Have a go for yourself and see
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Re: Panning in Drum and Bass and other electronic genres

Postby thescientist » Sun May 04, 2008 3:45 pm

DUBIX wrote:
thescientist wrote:Even though this question doesn't pertain to electronic music (I'm learning to record rock and roll), I have a question about panning in stereo vs. mono. I am doing some recording right now and have ideas for panning certain instruments to different sides to help give more room and space for all the parts. Along with some careful frequency slotting, I think the mixes are sounding nice and every instrument is getting the right amount of "space" in the mix, or at least I think so anyway. With this in mind, I moniter and record certain parts (drums, some electric guitars) in stereo but had a question based on the topic of this thread.

If I pan all my instruments with stereo perspective in mind, what can I expect from this being played back on a mono system? I'm kinda unsure what to expect if I mix this way relative to how a stereo mix will sound when played back through a mono system. I know a mono mix (everything panned in the center?) played back in stereo would just be the same mono signal sent to both speakers, right? Thanks for any help, sorry of it is off-topic, figured it would be easier to do in here than in a new thread.

You will still get some of the effect of stereo when you put your mix in mono. But you need to check that you don't lose anything.

I have a monitor controller which has a mono button so i check it on there, most desks have this as well. Its probably to have a true mono reference to check it properly though.

I once read an interview with Don Smith who said he pans in mono! This sounds crazy but I tried it and it does work. He said if you monitor in mono and move a sound around until it sits or stands out nicely. When you put the mix back into stereo, the panning is much more effective. Have a go for yourself and see

cool idea. I have a breakout box so luckily I can keep the stero going all the way into my computer, and with audacity I can record L+R at the same time and then export to .wav. I imagine this would help resolve many stereo/mono inconsistancies, no?
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Re: Panning in Drum and Bass and other electronic genres

Postby DUBIX » Sun May 04, 2008 4:11 pm

That would be ok for making stereo recordings but you will need to be able to monitor in mono to check for consistency. What I would do in your position is set up a mono aux which you can send your mix to and route this to an output of your sound card and into a mono speaker then you have a mono reference to check your mix through. I don't really know audacity though so I'm not sure if this is possible. Alternatively get a monitor controller, I have the presonus central station and its great the mackie big knob is also a good option
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Re: Panning in Drum and Bass and other electronic genres

Postby thescientist » Sun May 04, 2008 5:44 pm

DUBIX wrote:That would be ok for making stereo recordings but you will need to be able to monitor in mono to check for consistency. What I would do in your position is set up a mono aux which you can send your mix to and route this to an output of your sound card and into a mono speaker then you have a mono reference to check your mix through. I don't really know audacity though so I'm not sure if this is possible. Alternatively get a monitor controller, I have the presonus central station and its great the mackie big knob is also a good option

cool, i will be incorporating said system into my studio asap then!
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