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SOS Technical Glossary

All about the tools and techniques involved in capturing sound, in the studio or on location.

Re: SOS Technical Glossary

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Tue Sep 05, 2017 9:03 am

:lol:
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Re: SOS Technical Glossary

Postby wireman » Thu Feb 01, 2018 10:36 pm

Hugh Robjohns wrote:I am pleased to report that the SOS Technical Glossary has been found in the back of a cupboard, dusted off, and slotted back into the online archives.
...
There are plans to develop this resource substantially in the future, too... but in the meantime, we welcome any suggestions for other terms to be added.

Belatedly and hurried (as I just noticed this interesting post) here are some comments...

  • Algorithm

    First definition is not correct.

    An algorthm is a sequence of instructions describing how to perform a task, often implemented in a computer language and compiled into a computer program. For example Quicksort is an algorithm for sorting data.
  • Computer
    I think it is much more than the definition provided.
  • Data Reduction
    The text describes compression (of data) rather than any other data reduction techniques. So perhaps move it to a compression (data) entry.
  • File
    A container for stored digital data that usually has a meaningful name which it can be accessed by. ...
  • Initialize
    I don't think so, this could just return a device to a startup state with new settings that were not a factory default.
  • K
    should be lower case
  • MB
    10- (SI units) or 2-based depending on context, MiB is a more recent tern to help disambiguate this in computing contexts.
  • Moving Coil
    Also the moving coil phono cartridge.
  • Near Field
    Also used to describe the distance from a sound source or a device to be used at that position (for example a microphone)
  • Nyquist Theorem]
    Why concentrate on aliasing, isn't the point that this frequency is what is required to reproduce the original signal?
  • Reverberation Time
    Add a definition for this.
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Re: SOS Technical Glossary

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Thu Feb 01, 2018 11:35 pm

Thanks -- useful feedback. I'll take a look at incorporating these ideas tomorrow.

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Re: SOS Technical Glossary

Postby Watchmaker » Fri Feb 02, 2018 12:03 am

Brilliant.

Under Audio Interface perhaps an update for Thunderbolt, AVB and Dante protocols is warranted?
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Re: SOS Technical Glossary

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Fri Feb 02, 2018 10:23 am

wireman wrote:Belatedly and hurried (as I just noticed this interesting post) here are some comments...

Thanks again -- I've updated the Glossary.

Nyquist Theorem
Why concentrate on aliasing, isn't the point that this frequency is what is required to reproduce the original signal?

Yes... but the reason it is necessary to sample at (at least) twice the wanted signal bandwidth is to ensure the modulation images don't overlay the wanted audio -- which is aliasing. Only in this way can the original audio be perfectly reconstructed.

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Re: SOS Technical Glossary

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Fri Feb 02, 2018 10:24 am

Watchmaker wrote:Under Audio Interface perhaps an update for Thunderbolt, AVB and Dante protocols is warranted?

Good point -- done!

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Re: SOS Technical Glossary

Postby wireman » Fri Feb 02, 2018 9:26 pm

I have a final set of suggestions.

An alternative definition:

  • Room Modes
    Resonances of a room occuring at particular frequencies due to patterns of sound waves caused by surface reflections. Particularly evident at low frequencies.

Possible new definitions:

  • Pot
    A rotary control usually used in mixers and other processors. Derived from potentiometer.
  • Snake
    A multi-core cable providing connections at both ends used as an alternative to using many individual leads.
  • Loom
    A set of leads bound together for convenience.
  • Gooseneck
    Used to describe a curved (and possibly flexible) part of a support or microphone.
  • Isolation Room
    A room or large enclosure that provides sound isolation, used for practice rooms and recording studios.
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Re: SOS Technical Glossary

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Fri Feb 02, 2018 9:49 pm

:thumbup: Good suggestions. I'll implement them over the weekend. Thanks.

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Re: SOS Technical Glossary

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Sun Feb 04, 2018 1:44 pm

Done.
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Re: SOS Technical Glossary

Postby John Willett » Sun Feb 04, 2018 3:45 pm

wireman wrote:I have a final set of suggestions.

An alternative definition:

  • Gooseneck
    Used to describe a curved (and possibly flexible) part of a support or microphone.

This definition is incorrect.

A Gooseneck (sometimes calles swan neck) is always flexible - that's why it's called a goose neck.

A non-flexible extension is called an "extension tube"

So - the correct definition would be:-

  • Gooseneck
    Used to describe a curved and flexible part of a support for a microphone.
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Re: SOS Technical Glossary

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Sun Feb 04, 2018 4:03 pm

Yes... I did wonder about that as I typed it and was going to consult with my colleagues about it tomorrow. But what the heck, let's just go with 'flexible'! I've updated the entry.

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Re: SOS Technical Glossary

Postby wireman » Tue Feb 06, 2018 8:53 pm

John Willett wrote:A Gooseneck (sometimes calles swan neck) is always flexible - that's why it's called a goose neck.

I thought this as well but I did a quick check for exceptions and came up with this microphone which is described as having a fixed-placement gooseneck.
Looking further, I see that this does not mean what I thought it did at the time.
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Re: SOS Technical Glossary

Postby John Willett » Wed Feb 07, 2018 3:17 pm

wireman wrote:
John Willett wrote:A Gooseneck (sometimes calles swan neck) is always flexible - that's why it's called a goose neck.

I thought this as well but I did a quick check for exceptions and came up with this microphone which is described as having a fixed-placement gooseneck.
Looking further, I see that this does not mean what I thought it did at the time.

This microphone *is* flexible - it just has a solid bit in the middle, but it's flexible at both ends. So can really be called a gooseneck.

If it was fixed angles, like the AKG VR1, then it would not be a gooseneck.
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