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Vintage Digital Equipment

All about the tools and techniques involved in capturing sound, in the studio or on location.

Re: Vintage Digital Equipment

Postby James Perrett » Tue Jul 17, 2018 10:00 pm

ken long wrote:
James Perrett wrote:IJust got hold of a PCM701 (but not the Betamax machine to go with it)

Nice. I picked up a betamax player a few years back for change... the PCM is good with VHS too, btw!

The previous owner of my 701 was using it with a VHS machine but in the late 80's another local studio had one that they used with a Betamax machine so there are one or two people I know with old Betamax tapes they'd like to listen to.
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Re: Vintage Digital Equipment

Postby Howdy Doody Time » Wed Jul 18, 2018 1:07 pm

Martin Walker wrote:
James Perrett wrote:There's vintage and then there's vintage. When I saw the title I thought we were going to the realms of 8 bit samplers or DAT machines. In my experience, most decent digital gear is still new enough to not have to worry too much about capacitors drying out and other signs of ageing. It tends to be the mechanics that lets it down.

Too true - in my experience DAT machines were notoriously finicky about playing back tapes recorded on other machines. Some makes seemed to manage it better than others, but I can still remember a very early visit to see Paul White (must have been 1996, and around an hour's journey) when he kindly offered to 'master' my first album from a set of DAT tracks onto a single CD for duplication.

My DAT tape recorded on a couple of Sony DAT machines simply wouldn't be recognised on either of his Fostex ones, so we ended up driving round to a couple of his local friends to borrow another Sony DAT machine, which thankfully read my tape and did the job :headbang:

I get the impression that 8-bit samplers stand the test of time rather better than DAT recorders (thank goodness! ;) )


Martin

My DAT (Sony 2700A) is in constant use. It takes AES from the 02R, feeds the finaliser, and records the incoming. It never has any trouble playing back what it recorded :) But then, it is a Professional bit of kit. My 8 bit sampling keyboard has no doubt been recycled many times and is probably a set of dominoes now.
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Re: Vintage Digital Equipment

Postby James Perrett » Wed Jul 18, 2018 1:42 pm

I've found that Sony DAT machines tend to play a wider range of tapes than the Pioneer based machines (sold as Tascam, Fostex, Otari etc). My DTC55 has worn out its second set of heads though I still occasionally use it when I need an extra A/D or D/A.
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Re: Vintage Digital Equipment

Postby Martin Walker » Thu Jul 19, 2018 3:20 pm

James Perrett wrote:I've found that Sony DAT machines tend to play a wider range of tapes than the Pioneer based machines (sold as Tascam, Fostex, Otari etc).

Exactly James! :clap:


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Re: Vintage Digital Equipment

Postby altruistica » Mon Jul 23, 2018 9:38 pm

In a similar vein, I've got a couple of Yamaha 02R's in flightcases here. I had been running one in the studio but it couldn't really cope with the number of inputs I had so I was looking at replacing it with the Presonus Series 3 Studiolive. I've been following the desk since it was announced in 2016. After consuming everything that has been written about the desk one thing I had not noticed until rummaging the forums.....the desk will only do 48Khz recording? Owners have been waiting over a year for 44.1 implementation, That was it for me....oh and after watching the testimonials about Studio One being a great DAW and comparing it to Cubase and deciding it probably was promising much and delivering little. I switched my thinking back to what I know and purchased a twenty year old Soundtracs desk. Yeh, the odd channel needs fixing (clicky switch, cap gone bad) but it gives a sound that I find hard to get out of anything digital. Must be my ears.....
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Re: Vintage Digital Equipment

Postby VTypeV4 » Wed Jul 25, 2018 1:32 pm

altruistica wrote: digital. Must be my ears.....
ce

I think it's a matter or perception. I've used many a desk that's different whether it be digital or analogue but it's both a subjective and personal experience.

One of the 'worst' sounding consoles I've ever used was a Behringer Euro series we had in my old soul band - the eight group, 32 channel one with 60mm faders that looked not unlike the Mackie - I didn't like it one bit. Conversely, last sunday I did a show on an X32 and thought it was great.

And I worry about my ears too but my clients still seem happy, my reputation is still intact and I continue to get work - whatever I mix on.. :thumbup:
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Re: Vintage Digital Equipment

Postby Howdy Doody Time » Thu Jul 26, 2018 8:05 pm

The Power of Marketing I suppose. I listen to great recordings a lot, - The Four Tops, The Beatles, Leonard Cohen etc. I'm assured by very well respected and massively experienced experts in the field that in those days the equipment available was often built or modified on site and may not have been as technologically advanced as that which we have access to today. Things progress of course, the 'vintage' equipment I have here was initially purchased from Sony Classical Division and was no doubt instrumental in the production of some great recordings that are still available for sale now. Todays equipment is more compact, more energy efficient and capable of more detailed recordings, whether or not you can hear a difference. You can't ignore those great earlier recordings however, nor the rave reviews of the original Yamaha 02R's for example, and unfortunately no amount of marketing is going to send a fabulously talented performer with a superb song into your studio.
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