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Making My own impulse responses with Reaverb

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Making My own impulse responses with Reaverb

Postby Moroccomoose » Wed Sep 19, 2018 8:45 am

Hi Folks,

I am trying to make my own impulse responses using Reaper's ReaVerb plugin. For no other reason than to see if I can! I have had a go, but the result is not what I was hoping for. I'll try and describe my workflow and hopefully someone can suggest what I am doing wrong

My idea is to try and create responses for some guitar effects pedals and pre amps, to make a kind of a poor man's Kemper!
The environment setup is:

Reaper channel with sine sweep stimulus - interface - pedal in - pedal out - interface - Reaper channel recording pedal output. I am not using a mic.

My sine sweep is one generated by the Reaverb plugin and is about 4s long. I play the sweep into the pedal and record the pedal output. I am punching in and out of the track, so I am only recording the result of the sweep, there is no silence before or after the pedal recording.


Using the deconvolver feature in Reaverb, I point it towards the pedal response wav and the sinesweep wav to create the IR.

The The ReaVerb plugin automatically imports the newly created IR.

When I then play the guitar through the IR reverb, it basically sounds like a horrible laggy scratchy reverb or echo, it is not even close to some kind of immitated guitar distortion.

Furthermore, if I set up an IR in Cubase using keFIR and newly created IR file, keFIR reports the file length to be 0 (zero) seconds and no wave form is shown.


Can anyone suggest what I am doing wrong, or what should be doing, or even if my expectation is too high!? I'd also be interested in others experiences in making IRs

Cheers,

Stu.
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Re: Making My own impulse responses with Reaverb

Postby Martin Walker » Wed Sep 19, 2018 3:17 pm

Hi Stu!

I hope I'm not misinterpreting what you've tried, but when you say:

"When I then play the guitar through the IR reverb, it basically sounds like a horrible laggy scratchy reverb or echo, it is not even close to some kind of immitated guitar distortion."

...are you attempting to capture the sound of guitar distortion? Because that won't work ;)

Static convolution is great for capturing decaying reverb sounds, and you can also use it to capture the instantaneous frequency response of preamps, power amps, EQ units and even microphones.

However, it can't capture dynamic/non-linear effects, such as distortion (which varies with input level) compression (which again varies with input level). The only real way to do this is to use dynamic convolution.

This technique (the best known example is probably Acustica Audio's range) creates a series of convolution captures across a range of input levels, which are then selected automatically by your input level during playback.

However, there are lots of wonderfully creative things you can do with static convolution - have a read of my SOS feature here:

http://www.soundonsound.com/techniques/ ... -responses

Here' a reviwe of Acustica Audio Nebula 3.5 that I wrote way back for SOS, which explains dynamic convolution in more detail.

www.soundonsound.com/reviews/acustica-nebula-pro-35

Hope this helps!


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