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Would it be silly to buy a VS 2480?

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Would it be silly to buy a VS 2480?

Postby vrupert » Wed Feb 06, 2019 9:43 pm

I am trying to set up a demo studio for myself (8 track minimum). I am struggling with whether to go the route of a USB Audio Interface (I already have Logic Pro 8 on an iMac) or change up and go with something like a Yamaha VS 2000, 2400 or 2480, or an Akai DPS24.

I previously had a Lexicon IOnix U82 which was rendered useless after a recent OSX update. This has led me to be frustrated with the lifecycle limitations of computer-based recording. I don't want to spend money on an interface and software that are likely to be unusable in 5-10 years.

While the editing and effects processing capabilities of a digital board/recorder combo like the VS series are not as full-featured as even entry level DAW's, they're going to work as long as they are physically able to and won't be turned into a useless brick by an unrelated yet compulsory software upgrade.
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Re: Would it be silly to buy a VS 2480?

Postby The Elf » Wed Feb 06, 2019 10:54 pm

Welcome to the SOS forum!

There's nothing wrong with a hardware(-ish) recorder as long as you understand and accept the limitations. It sounds like you're going in with your eyes open.

But if it were me... no, I'd go for a computer-based DAW. But then I have a purpose-built PC that works perfectly well, day in, day out, and I don't mind upgrading every once in a while to keep on top of the technology.
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Re: Would it be silly to buy a VS 2480?

Postby Sam Spoons » Thu Feb 07, 2019 12:36 am

There is no such thing as a 'compulsory upgrade' to either your OSX version or DAW.More importantly, If you find a combination that works for you you can use it until some hardware finally dies. The problems arise when you have a single machine that you use for everything and internet security demands an OSX upgrade or some app you use for non musical purposes has been upgraded and is no longer compatible with the OSX you are running.

I run my 'Studio Computer' isolated from the internet and day to day computing needs so I'm never troubled by nag screens to upgrade this, that or the other and can continue making music until something becomes intolerable, which would happen with a hardware recorder too (though I do keep getting nags to sign in to iTunes but that's just because I haven't got around to stopping the auto log in attempts).

Keep the last computer for music (or, keep the last computer for 'everything else') and run the new one for music (or everything else). I have taken this town extreme (more by default than design I hasten to add) and have two working 2008 Mac Pro's (Studio and Office/Spare) and two MBPs, one of which is my 'everything else' computer and the other is a spare/internet browser.
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Re: Would it be silly to buy a VS 2480?

Postby MOF » Thu Feb 07, 2019 3:34 am

I don't want to spend money on an interface and software that are likely to be unusable in 5-10 years.
Have you thought about staying with the OS that supports all your musical software on the internal drive and using an external drive with a current OS kept up to date for all the other progams?
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Re: Would it be silly to buy a VS 2480?

Postby Eddy Deegan » Thu Feb 07, 2019 4:07 am

vrupert wrote:While the editing and effects processing capabilities of a digital board/recorder combo like the VS series are not as full-featured as even entry level DAW's, they're going to work as long as they are physically able to and won't be turned into a useless brick by an unrelated yet compulsory software upgrade.

I went down the same path as you recently: https://www.soundonsound.com/forum/view ... 15&t=64537

The upshot is that having thoroughly researched every hardware-based avenue I could find I ended up using a DAW again and although I did buy a new PC specifically to run it I couldn't be happier now.

vrupert wrote:I don't want to spend money on an interface and software that are likely to be unusable in 5-10 years.

I owned a VS2480 for some years and I really liked it. However, it did develop a fault (the display was corrupted) after 5 years or so of use and although I was able to get it repaired, I had to ship it off for 2-3 weeks.

Any hardware multitracker could develop a fault in 5-10 years or less. That fault may be repairable, but it may not be.

Buying a VS2480 is not a silly idea, but go into it with your eyes open. I would suggest that getting a replacement PC component, or even a new PC, is going to be less painful (and quite possibly cheaper) than replacing (or finding someone who can fix) an old piece of hardware, and in the event you need one, even a modestly-priced replacement audio interface for a DAW system is a click-and-overnight-delivery away and, especially these days, for home use you don't need expensive pieces of kit.

If you buy a VS2480 and it dies randomly one day in 3 years time then unless you've painstakingly exported your projects as per-track WAV files to CD backups then you're in for a world of hurt trying to get your original masters back (and unless you can find a replacement unit, you probably won't succeed).

All that said, if you want something more contemporary in the hardware field, you could do worse than to look at the Tascam DP-24SD or DP-32SD. If you don't require MIDI sync for sequencers then it's probably got everything you need. The earlier DP24 model has MIDI sync by the way (https://www.soundonsound.com/reviews/tascam-dp24) though you may have to hunt a bit for one.

If you're wanting a VS2480 for the ability to plug in an external monitor (which was a very cool feature and really assisted with operating it) then based on my own experiences I would recommend you rethink and go down the DAW route.
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Re: Would it be silly to buy a VS 2480?

Postby blinddrew » Thu Feb 07, 2019 11:19 am

It's worth mentioning that different manufacturers have very different approaches to supporting older kit. We've probably all hit the situation of having a perfectly useable piece of hardware or software become obsolete through an OS update (or other hardware change) at some point, but there are companies who do a really good job of long-term support.
RME are frequently lauded on this forum because, as well as making very good kit, they also continue to support that kit for years and years.
My next interface is likely to be an RME for that reason (though Focusrite are doing a very good job in supporting my current device and their bundled software so it might not be completely clear cut :) ).
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Re: Would it be silly to buy a VS 2480?

Postby OneWorld » Thu Feb 07, 2019 1:31 pm

I suppose it depends what you pay for it. I wouldn't consider the 2480 to worth much more than say £250. But double that figure and you could get a decent PC +DAW software (Reaper for example) a perfectly acceptable interface and off you go.

Then once you have all the essentials, setup the PC to run sweet and fast, get rid of all the penny muck and other useless peripherals (Why oh why don't Microsoft release a stripped back to the bone version of the OS) then once set up, image it, establish a backup routine, make recording templates for the DAW software and basically use it as a multi-track recorder.

Where a HDD multi-tracker has the advantage over a DAW is immediacy. However, more and more manufacturers are including a recording facility, albeit either all tracks or just stereo, but some of these can be used in standalone mode, so at least you can just make a recording before having to wait for the DAW to get up a full head of steam.

Then there is the recently released TASCAM Model 24, reviewed in SOS and I am sure other manufacturers will follow with their versions
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