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Prices of the sm58 mic

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Re: Prices of the sm58 mic

Postby Sam Spoons » Tue Mar 19, 2019 10:58 am

music master wrote:Mike was right when he said you will get 2 different answers on this forum

This is true, but appreciation of music is subjective and we all like different things So we all have different opinions. However the opinions of the regular posters on here are well known to the community and all will have value.

Now back to the sm58.
Reasons I have been so keen on it because one, I was told it has the best quality sound and two, it would suit my voice type for heavy rock.
I was not bothered about its reliability and durability though. But now I read that the road M1 is the equivalent to the sm58 but cheaper.

Well I don't know what to read half the time with all these little different stories from different people saying that one Mic suites one person's voice but not someone ellses visor versor. There dose not seam to be any real hard evidence on voice classification regarding micropones

Again it is subjective (and a bit of a 'black art') traditional voice classifications relate only to vocal range and not to the quality (in a bright/warm/etc context). All studio and stage mics cover the frequency range needed to reproduce the human voice from Basso Profound up to Soprano but a 'mellow' soprano might sound better with a brighter sounding mic. For your needs an SM58 will do the job, as you said in an earlier post, it is an 'industry standard' you won't go wrong with it. But if money is really tight there other mics you can consider, e.g. an AKG D5 costs around £50, most would say it is not inferior to the SM58 despite being a fair bit cheaper.

Mike Stranks' experience and knowledge means that his advice is amongst the best so if you are conflicted ask him a straight question and go with his suggestion.

TBH it is easy to overthink this when really almost any of the kit discussed would do a decent job and you could get back to making music.
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Re: Prices of the sm58 mic

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Tue Mar 19, 2019 11:23 am

music master wrote:Reasons I have been so keen on it because one, I was told it has the best quality sound and two, it would suit my voice type for heavy rock.

Point two is obviously subjective and you'd have to try it in person to judge that... but it is plausible. Point one is possibly more contentious; many would argue that there are a lot of better-sounding mics than the SM58 -- most also being a lot more expensive, of course! Indeed, if you look at the stage vocal mics used by a wide range of high-end artists, the SM58 won't feature very prominently! However, it would also be valid to say that the SM58 is a very competent mic that has been well-proven over a considerable time, it is a well-known quantity by all live-sound mixing engineers, and it's a mic that is guaranteed to deliver something reliably usable under all conditions. And that counts for a lot!

But now I read that the road M1 is the equivalent to the sm58 but cheaper.


The company is Rode:http://www.rode.com/microphones/m1

I've not used the M1 myself, but I've heard some good reports about it. I gather it has a brighter sound with a more open high-end than the SM58, but is otherwise similar in terms of sensitivity and feedback resistance.

There was a discussion about the M1 and D5 in this forum thread: https://www.soundonsound.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=26&t=34610&hilit=Rode%20M1#p315809

...different people saying that one Mic suites one person's voice but not someone ellses visor versor. There dose not seam to be any real hard evidence on voice classification regarding micropones

The human voice is a very complicated sound source, and microphones tend to have very non-uniform frequency responses. So, while any microphone will capture the voice adequately, it is often the case -- especially in a studio recording situation -- that one specific model of microphone just happens to dovetail wonderfully with that person's voice, to capture a sound that just has an extra something special about it not found with other mics. All entirely subjective of course, but it is something that most have experienced.

In a live-sound situation, though, aspects other than tonal attractiveness tend to become more important -- things like feedback resistance, handling noise, resistance to plosive popping, ability to cut through the mix, and so on. And again, the SM58 generally scores highly in these areas which is why it has built its reputation as a reliable workhorse over the years.
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