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Home Studio vs Professional Studio

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Re: Home Studio vs Professional Studio

PostPosted: Fri Nov 29, 2019 3:34 pm
by shufflebeat
Hugh Robjohns wrote:.../MI equipment

I keep seeing this phrase around t'internet and have a rough idea what people are referring to. However when I ask I get differing explanations as to what it actually stands for. Anybody care to suggest?

@OP - it depends.

Re: Home Studio vs Professional Studio

PostPosted: Fri Nov 29, 2019 4:12 pm
by MOF
I keep seeing this phrase around t'internet and have a rough idea what people are referring to

MI refers to the Music (equipment) industry, it’s where a lot of crossover or semi-pro gear comes from. For example Gibson started out with electric guitars but now also makes equipment such as KRK monitors.

Re: Home Studio vs Professional Studio

PostPosted: Fri Nov 29, 2019 9:04 pm
by shufflebeat
MOF wrote:MI refers to the Music (equipment) industry, it’s where a lot of crossover or semi-pro gear comes from.

Thanks, that is certainly one of the explanations I've heard which does differentiate it from all that sound reinforcement equipment inspired by the agricultural sector. [Still a bit uncertain/confused]

@OP - many musicians will recognise the experience of listening back to a studio recording and wondering why it doesn't sound like what they had in mind at the initial creative stages.

Possibly even more common, many music fans will remember hearing a studio recording of a song they have heard live (maybe this is more a Punk thing) and thought, "it's ok but it's not as good as the live version. For reference, check out the version of "No Woman, No Cry" on the "Natty Dread" album and picture my jaw hitting the floor in horror. I have since come to love both versions.

I would suggest that much of the discrepancy between live/studio sound is the result of having all the gear and no time to learn how to use it. Studio techs are not necessarily fans of every client that walks through the office door and can't communicate with unfamiliar artists with sky-high expectations so play it safe and this can be heard in the final output.

As a result of decent recording hard/software becoming available to the great unwashed there is a strain of music that translates well between club and studio as the process of experimentation and reflection has become cheaper and easier.

Re: Home Studio vs Professional Studio

PostPosted: Fri Nov 29, 2019 9:36 pm
by Sam Spoons
I wonder if it's more to do with the performance, new bands are often intimidated and a little reserved in the studio? I know I was when a mate with a decent small pro studio offered to record a demo of my covers band. He did get a decent enough performance out of us but it wasn't as exciting as us playing to an audience.

Re: Home Studio vs Professional Studio

PostPosted: Fri Nov 29, 2019 11:15 pm
by Arpangel
Sam Spoons wrote:I wonder if it's more to do with the performance, new bands are often intimidated and a little reserved in the studio? I know I was when a mate with a decent small pro studio offered to record a demo of my covers band. He did get a decent enough performance out of us but it wasn't as exciting as us playing to an audience.

I think this is terrible actually, if a new band feels intimidated in any recording situation or studio it's not their fault, it's the studio.
It's up to the studio, engineers etc to make them feel as relaxed and creative as possible, if this isn't that case then they're in the wrong place.

Re: Home Studio vs Professional Studio

PostPosted: Fri Nov 29, 2019 11:47 pm
by Watchmaker
Playing live and studio recording are two distinct disciplines with different objectives and feedback loops. Sure a "song" is a common element, but draw the Venn diagram in your mind as there are a great many important distinctions.

Re: Home Studio vs Professional Studio

PostPosted: Fri Nov 29, 2019 11:56 pm
by blinddrew
Much as I like twiddling knobs and tweaking waveforms, recording the band as singer, songwriter, equipment provider, engineer, mixer, producer, biscuit provider and all the rest was a pretty stressful experience and the room didn't sound great.
So whilst I'm happy recording my solo stuff at home, if we had the cash I'd definitely prefer to record the band stuff in a proper studio. Somewhere with a big enough live room that we could all be in the same place and properly 'perform' the song.

Re: Home Studio vs Professional Studio

PostPosted: Sat Nov 30, 2019 12:00 am
by Sam Spoons
Arpangel wrote:
Sam Spoons wrote:I wonder if it's more to do with the performance, new bands are often intimidated and a little reserved in the studio? I know I was when a mate with a decent small pro studio offered to record a demo of my covers band. He did get a decent enough performance out of us but it wasn't as exciting as us playing to an audience.

I think this is terrible actually, if a new band feels intimidated in any recording situation or studio it's not their fault, it's the studio.
It's up to the studio, engineers etc to make them feel as relaxed and creative as possible, if this isn't that case then they're in the wrong place.

No it's not, it's just that inexperienced bands are bound to be tense in a new situation (i.e. the studio). A good studio will certainly do their best to get a good performance but, as Watchmaker says :-.

Watchmaker wrote:Playing live and studio recording are two distinct disciplines with different objectives and feedback loops. Sure a "song" is a common element, but draw the Venn diagram in your mind as there are a great many important distinctions.

Re: Home Studio vs Professional Studio

PostPosted: Sat Nov 30, 2019 12:17 am
by Arpangel
Sam Spoons wrote:
Arpangel wrote:
Sam Spoons wrote:I wonder if it's more to do with the performance, new bands are often intimidated and a little reserved in the studio? I know I was when a mate with a decent small pro studio offered to record a demo of my covers band. He did get a decent enough performance out of us but it wasn't as exciting as us playing to an audience.

I think this is terrible actually, if a new band feels intimidated in any recording situation or studio it's not their fault, it's the studio.
It's up to the studio, engineers etc to make them feel as relaxed and creative as possible, if this isn't that case then they're in the wrong place.

No it's not, it's just that inexperienced bands are bound to be tense in a new situation (i.e. the studio). A good studio will certainly do their best to get a good performance but, as Watchmaker says :-.

Watchmaker wrote:Playing live and studio recording are two distinct disciplines with different objectives and feedback loops. Sure a "song" is a common element, but draw the Venn diagram in your mind as there are a great many important distinctions.

I know we're all different, but for me, there is no difference at all, between studio or live performances, I'm still giving a performance, the audience is just different, or just me!
I know there are works that are created in the studio, and the feedback processes are crucial to those things, in that environment, but surely, you must know what you want to a certain extent, as a band, I guess that's why some bands choose certain studios, in preference to others.
I still stand by the traditional commercial studio set up, it's a great leveler, and it gives you the opportunity to get useful feedback, but there is a school of thought that thinks exactly the opposite is true, and critical isolation and home studios can yield far more original results.

Re: Home Studio vs Professional Studio

PostPosted: Sat Nov 30, 2019 12:21 am
by ConcertinaChap
Arpangel wrote:I think this is terrible actually, if a new band feels intimidated in any recording situation or studio it's not their fault, it's the studio.
It's up to the studio, engineers etc to make them feel as relaxed and creative as possible, if this isn't that case then they're in the wrong place.

I know I'm small fry in this business but a lot of the people I record it's their first time in a studio and they're intimidated before they even ring the doorbell. So a big chunk of the set up is about putting them at their ease and in particular convincing them that mistakes aren't important because they're easy to handle. The more you reduce the fear of mistakes the less mistakes happen and the better the overall recording. This is more about the attitude of the engineer, though, rather than home v. pro studio. The only pro studio I've recorded in the engineer (Doug Bailey of Wild Goose) was very good at this and had a strong influence on the way I try to do things now.

CC

Re: Home Studio vs Professional Studio

PostPosted: Sat Nov 30, 2019 12:30 am
by blinddrew
Yep, I've never recorded someone else in a studio, but I have recorded lots of videos and a few podcasts and getting the guests comfortable is a skill. I'm almost certainly way better at that than I am at recording!
So I'd argue that it's a little bit of everything really. People will be nervous when they arrive, a good engineer will help alleviate that and help get the best out of them. But they'll probably still be nervous, partly about being in a new, alien and expensive environment, and partly just the usual nerves of a performance.

I reckon...

Re: Home Studio vs Professional Studio

PostPosted: Sat Nov 30, 2019 2:02 am
by James Perrett
blinddrew wrote:Much as I like twiddling knobs and tweaking waveforms, recording the band as singer, songwriter, equipment provider, engineer, mixer, producer, biscuit provider and all the rest was a pretty stressful experience and the room didn't sound great.
So whilst I'm happy recording my solo stuff at home, if we had the cash I'd definitely prefer to record the band stuff in a proper studio. Somewhere with a big enough live room that we could all be in the same place and properly 'perform' the song.

I'd definitely echo this. If a band that I'm playing in wants to record then I want someone else to do the engineering so that I can concentrate on the playing. I've tried doing everything and I find that there's just too much pressure to both perform and get the sound right so the end product is compromised. I'm usually happy to take over the engineering duties once I've finished playing though.

Re: Home Studio vs Professional Studio

PostPosted: Sat Nov 30, 2019 8:55 am
by Arpangel
I think the problem can be, with a lot of people, I've come across it quite a bit, is giving technical guidance, to enable "their" ideas, without making someone feel like you're producing, or taking over.

Re: Home Studio vs Professional Studio

PostPosted: Wed Dec 04, 2019 1:05 pm
by JackS
Thanks everyone for the responses, very much appreciated!

Re: Home Studio vs Professional Studio

PostPosted: Thu Dec 05, 2019 11:26 pm
by Guest
JackS wrote:Hi,

I am currently doing a dissertation for my college course and was wondering if I could get everyones thoughts on which is best and why?

Thanks

You are gonna be struggling to record a 60 piece orchestra in yer home studio.