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Make recordings clean

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Re: Make recordings clean

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2020 6:31 pm
by Dr Huge Longjohns
realised in-between spoken phrases gating was needed.
I never gate vocals (or anything else tbh), it's too easy to lose something important, a little breath, a bit of throat noise that adds feel or emotion. I simply go through the track in solo, sometimes with headphones on, and manually edit out the noises I don't want. It's trivial to do and takes no time at all.

Re: Make recordings clean

PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2020 9:56 pm
by Martin Walker
DC-Choppah wrote:
aviorrok wrote:
Yeah here’s a clean:

https://youtu.be/Y30pfWIQfoo

And here is my:
I know the mix is not good enough

https://youtu.be/J5o-izwzFrw

I just hear a different arrangement and mix. There are spots in the 'clean' one with complete silence. I also hear how everything lines up on beat and crisply decays on beat too.

Your mix has reverb tails, less upfront vocals, and more going on arrangement-wise behind the vocal, sloppier entries and exits of sounds. Not in a bad way, just that you are comparing to something that has been aligned and edited to have everything locked onto boundaries.

You should tighten up your arrangement and make all the sounds come and go on the beat if that is what you are after. Sounds artificial to me, but that may be what you are after.

Fascinating couple of links as a comparison, and a genuinely helpful response from DC-Choppah :thumbup:

Sometimes, to create music like the 'clean' 1st example, I suspect you need a 'perfect performance', because with so few mix elements and little or no reverb, the performer is totally 'exposed'.

Yes, a little clever editing may clean up such a performance a little, but often it's best to leave it as it is, even with slight imperfections, to retain the human element.

So as is often quoted here, the performance is the most important element, followed by good recorded acoustics, far more than choices of microphone or other gear in the chain.


Martin

Re: Make recordings clean

PostPosted: Wed Jan 15, 2020 11:49 am
by aviorrok
Martin Walker wrote:
DC-Choppah wrote:
aviorrok wrote:
Yeah here’s a clean:

https://youtu.be/Y30pfWIQfoo

And here is my:
I know the mix is not good enough

https://youtu.be/J5o-izwzFrw

I just hear a different arrangement and mix. There are spots in the 'clean' one with complete silence. I also hear how everything lines up on beat and crisply decays on beat too.

Your mix has reverb tails, less upfront vocals, and more going on arrangement-wise behind the vocal, sloppier entries and exits of sounds. Not in a bad way, just that you are comparing to something that has been aligned and edited to have everything locked onto boundaries.

You should tighten up your arrangement and make all the sounds come and go on the beat if that is what you are after. Sounds artificial to me, but that may be what you are after.

Fascinating couple of links as a comparison, and a genuinely helpful response from DC-Choppah :thumbup:

Sometimes, to create music like the 'clean' 1st example, I suspect you need a 'perfect performance', because with so few mix elements and little or no reverb, the performer is totally 'exposed'.

Yes, a little clever editing may clean up such a performance a little, but often it's best to leave it as it is, even with slight imperfections, to retain the human element.

So as is often quoted here, the performance is the most important element, followed by good recorded acoustics, far more than choices of microphone or other gear in the chain.


Martin

DI box can make sound "cleaner" with less noise? (for vocals and guitars)

Re: Make recordings clean

PostPosted: Wed Jan 15, 2020 12:13 pm
by Sam Spoons
You would not use a DI for vocals, it's function, usually, is to take an unbalanced signal from a guitar (or other 'instrument level' device), reduce it and output a balanced mic level signal.

It may make the guitar signal quieter/cleaner but it may do the opposite. What are you feeding the guitar into now and what is the pickup system in the guitar?

Re: Make recordings clean

PostPosted: Wed Jan 15, 2020 8:46 pm
by aviorrok
Sam Spoons wrote:You would not use a DI for vocals, it's function, usually, is to take an unbalanced signal from a guitar (or other 'instrument level' device), reduce it and output a balanced mic level signal.

It may make the guitar signal quieter/cleaner but it may do the opposite. What are you feeding the guitar into now and what is the pickup system in the guitar?

For acoustic guitar I recording with mic.
Electric guitar I connect to my interface (UR242) with TS (TRS make noise with my guitar) and amp simulator.
I want to reduce noises in my studio so I replaced my PC and add a carpet

Re: Make recordings clean

PostPosted: Wed Jan 15, 2020 10:39 pm
by Sam Spoons
IMHO you don't need a DI box then, your interface has a HiZ input option, make sure that is on when recording an electric guitar straight in and that will be as good as you can get with your present kit and workflow.

Carpet alone will do little to improve the studio acoustics, search for the many acoustic treatment threads and articles for more detailed info.

Re: Make recordings clean

PostPosted: Fri Jan 17, 2020 7:54 am
by Andy Wason
I'm new here and just an amateur, but it sounds to me that on the second track, the instruments and backing vocals are stepping all over the main vocal. I'd consider changing the eq's ( and possibly instruments) to get out of the way of the vocals. Also, IMHO gain staging and eq is the biggest culprit when recording in my home studio.

Re: Make recordings clean

PostPosted: Wed Feb 26, 2020 12:09 pm
by Argiletonne
a DI with a good quality transformer couldn't hurt the process,.
then record everything one at a time using the DI to whatever you do.