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Spectrum Analyser for human range audio to ultra sound

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Spectrum Analyser for human range audio to ultra sound

PostPosted: Sat Jan 25, 2020 3:02 am
by russellsh2
I am looking for a device that I can use to pickup sound, and show what sound it has sensed on a display like a spectrum analyzer. however the range needs to be from normal human hearing range to say 40khz. i am not interested in software for my phone or computer because these devices are designed for human hearing. most sound systems can't deal with frequencies above 20khz. this is for a number of experiments I would like to play with from a Sound Laser to sonoluminescence to using high frequency sound as a carrier signal for human range sound. I have looked and looked and I can't seem to find the name of the device let alone where to purchase one. any help would be greatly appreciated.

Re: Spectrum Analyser for human range audio to ultra sound

PostPosted: Sat Jan 25, 2020 11:51 am
by Tim Gillett
Actually many standard audio interfaces can probably capture up to around 90 kHz or more. Microphones that capture up to 40 kHz are around but they're more specialist items.

Re: Spectrum Analyser for human range audio to ultra sound

PostPosted: Sat Jan 25, 2020 12:07 pm
by Hugh Robjohns
russellsh2 wrote:I am looking for a device that I can use to pickup sound, and show what sound it has sensed on a display like a spectrum analyzer. however the range needs to be from normal human hearing range to say 40khz. i am not interested in software for my phone or computer because these devices are designed for human hearing.

If you want a spectrum-analyser display then you only have two choices: you either go down the computer/tablet/phone route, or you buy a professional laboratory spectrum analyser hardware unit!

The latter will cost as much as a car... so your only sensible option is to go down the computer app route in one form or another.

As has been said, you will need to make sure your sound-capturing device is capable of working across the full range you want. Conventional mics all tail off by 25kHz and most are lower, but there are mics that will reach up to 40 or 50kHz, and some that can reach 100kHz. Check out the offerings from Earthworks and Sanken, for example.

You could use these mics with a decent computer interface capable of running at a 96 or 192kHz sample rate, ensuring a bandwidth up to a nominal 48 or 96kHz, respectively, and then use a programme like Adobe Audition which has a spectrum analyser to reveal what's going on.

None of this is cheap... though.

On the other hand, a more affordable and possibly more practical alternative might be to use a bat-detecting system, such as EchoMeter Touch 3 which works with iOS devices (iphones or ipads etc) or Android devices, and gives a spectral display derived from its own plug-in mic unit

https://www.echometertouch.com/

There are a lot of different bat-detector systems around -- that one is just one I happen to be vaguely familiar with.

H

Re: Spectrum Analyser for human range audio to ultra sound

PostPosted: Sat Jan 25, 2020 12:34 pm
by Dr Huge Longjohns
On the other hand, a more affordable and possibly more practical alternative might be to use a bat-detecting system

This insight alone is worth your honorary doctorate. This forum never fails to amaze! :)

Re: Spectrum Analyser for human range audio to ultra sound

PostPosted: Sat Jan 25, 2020 12:42 pm
by Hugh Robjohns
:oops: :lol: :ugeek:

Re: Spectrum Analyser for human range audio to ultra sound

PostPosted: Sat Jan 25, 2020 12:48 pm
by Kwackman
Dr Huge Longjohns wrote:
On the other hand, a more affordable and possibly more practical alternative might be to use a bat-detecting system

This insight alone is worth your honorary doctorate. This forum never fails to amaze! :)

True, but this line is more intriguing...
Hugh Robjohns wrote:There are a lot of different bat-detector systems around -- that one is just one I happen to be vaguely familiar with.

Re: Spectrum Analyser for human range audio to ultra sound

PostPosted: Sat Jan 25, 2020 12:50 pm
by Hugh Robjohns
No2 daughter is a zoologist and has spent some time studying bats...

But actually, I have a handheld heterodyning bat detector which I often use around the studio and in recording locations. It's surprising how much ultrasonic noise there is in our modern world!

Switch-mode power supplies, display screen backlights, fluorescent lights, burglar detectors, and much more...

Re: Spectrum Analyser for human range audio to ultra sound

PostPosted: Sat Jan 25, 2020 1:19 pm
by The Red Bladder
Please tell your No2 daughter that when I was living in Israel and running a chicken farm (just me and few volunteers and 500,000 chicken!) in the summer evenings I could hear the large fruit bats - they sound like creaking leather. The sound seems to be around 15kHz - at least the bits I could hear! So there are bats that make noises that we can hear.

I could sort of emulate their sound by blowing air through my teeth, but if I did that too often, they came too close to see what all the fuss was about. And these are LARGE bats - more like flying rats and they flew within inches of my head. These things were huge - as in at least 80cm wingspan.

We have dozens (probably hundreds, given our location!) of regular, tiny Northern European bats around the studio and at night in summer the air is filled with them catching moths and midgies and other flying beasties - but whatever noise they make, it is obviously inaudible to human ears. One once got into the studio and it took an hour to chase the poor little thing out through a window.

Re: Spectrum Analyser for human range audio to ultra sound

PostPosted: Sat Jan 25, 2020 1:56 pm
by ManFromGlass
If Martin pops by here he might remember something I can’t. I think on one of his experimental music forums (there are two he curates) there was a post about a guy who built a device that brought the ultra high frequencies into the range of human hearing. There was a video of him walking around pointing the device at all manor of electrical devices outside and in. They all produced quite the racket when the device got near them. I went to the guys website and he was selling his devices.
I’ve done a quick search of the 2 forums but couldn’t find that posting.

Re: Spectrum Analyser for human range audio to ultra sound

PostPosted: Sat Jan 25, 2020 4:54 pm
by Kwackman
Hugh Robjohns wrote:But actually, I have a handheld heterodyning bat detector which I often use around the studio and in recording locations. It's surprising how much ultrasonic noise there is in our modern world!

Switch-mode power supplies, display screen backlights, fluorescent lights, burglar detectors, and much more...

:thumbup:
Things you never read on other forums!

Re: Spectrum Analyser for human range audio to ultra sound

PostPosted: Sat Jan 25, 2020 5:12 pm
by Martin Walker
ManFromGlass wrote:If Martin pops by here he might remember something I can’t. I think on one of his experimental music forums (there are two he curates) there was a post about a guy who built a device that brought the ultra high frequencies into the range of human hearing. There was a video of him walking around pointing the device at all manor of electrical devices outside and in. They all produced quite the racket when the device got near them. I went to the guys website and he was selling his devices.
I’ve done a quick search of the 2 forums but couldn’t find that posting.

Hi MFG!

Yes, I remember posting that on one of the two ongoing threads you mention, and will track it down. However, the device in question was picking up electromagnetic fields rather than ultrasonic energy.

However, in the meantime you may be interested in this vaguely similar steampunk device of my own, built around the Lite2Sound PX kit available from Rare Waves/ Eric Archer:

http://www.yewtreemagic.co.uk/soundworlds5.php

Image

It picks up changes in visible light levels, and the audio results can be surprisingly similar to those of ultrasonic/electric fields.

Here's a similar kit that picks up electromagnetic fields:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J-c0OoA ... e=emb_logo

...and a walkabout video of sounds picked up by such devices: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BdiGn0LPMPs


Martin

Re: Spectrum Analyser for human range audio to ultra sound

PostPosted: Sat Jan 25, 2020 9:53 pm
by Trevor Johnson
or you buy a professional laboratory spectrum analyser hardware unit! The latter will cost as much as a car.

Certainly RF spectrum analysers used to, but my Rigol SA with tracking generator cost a mere £1500, (9Khz to 1.5Ghz).

Some USB 'scopes, e.g. Picoscope, have FFT SAs which may do the job in the audio spectrum, but I'm not familiar with them.