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The never ending marimba miking experiments...

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The never ending marimba miking experiments...

Postby Arpangel » Wed Feb 26, 2020 10:37 pm

I've heard, through various grape vines, that the Beyer MC202 is very good at capturing transients, percussion sounds, with this in mind, I’m thinking it may be worth experimenting with it for our marimba?

:think:
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Re: The never ending marimba miking experiments...

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Wed Feb 26, 2020 10:46 pm

Good luck finding one of those...

If you can't, you could always try the more real mc201 which I think I might have suggested before... :wtf:

https://www.soundonsound.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=16&t=70173&start=20#p649114
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Re: The never ending marimba miking experiments...

Postby Arpangel » Wed Feb 26, 2020 10:56 pm

Hugh Robjohns wrote:Good luck finding one of those...

If you can't, you could always try the more real mc201 which I think I might have suggested before... :wtf:

I meant to say the MC201, I’ll give them a try.
I’m not on the ball right now, I’m confined to bed, hip and knee problems, plus a mysterious pain in my jaw, I’m not good and could do with a wheelchair right now, driving my car to the workshop today was beyond pain, I’m just out of it on pain killers.
Waiting for test results from hospital.
Sorry Hugh, probably too much info.
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Re: The never ending marimba miking experiments...

Postby blinddrew » Wed Feb 26, 2020 11:27 pm

Since we're dealing with pedantry, sorry, accuracy, I think you both mean an M201.
Nothing to C here. ;)
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Re: The never ending marimba miking experiments...

Postby Arpangel » Wed Feb 26, 2020 11:31 pm

blinddrew wrote:Since we're dealing with pedantry, sorry, accuracy, I think you both mean an M201.
Nothing to C here. ;)

Yes! one of these, or two in my case...

:D

https://www.thomann.de/gb/beyerdynamic_m201tg.htm
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Re: The never ending marimba miking experiments...

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Wed Feb 26, 2020 11:34 pm

Whoops... :oops: thank you Drew.

The important point about the M201 (and many other moving coil mics) is that they are a good choice for percussive instruments not because they capture the transient's accurately, but because they don't capture transient's very well at all.... As I explained in that previous thread. The result is a form of natural dynamic compression that makes for an easier signal to record, and a more natural sounding instrument with more body and less edge.
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Re: The never ending marimba miking experiments...

Postby blinddrew » Wed Feb 26, 2020 11:35 pm

9000+ posts, one token contribution to knowledge. ;)
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Re: The never ending marimba miking experiments...

Postby Sam Spoons » Wed Feb 26, 2020 11:47 pm

A good one though Drew :clap:

Would I be right thinking that transients decay as the distance increases so that a close miked cymbal recorded with a 201 sounds more like the live acoustic sound heard from a few metres away?
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Re: The never ending marimba miking experiments...

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Wed Feb 26, 2020 11:51 pm

High frequencies certainly get absorbed more quickly with distance through the air, so transient edges also soften with distance.
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Re: The never ending marimba miking experiments...

Postby Sam Spoons » Wed Feb 26, 2020 11:52 pm

:thumbup:
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Re: The never ending marimba miking experiments...

Postby Arpangel » Thu Feb 27, 2020 8:40 am

Hugh Robjohns wrote:that makes for an easier signal to record

That’s the bit I like...

:D
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Re: The never ending marimba miking experiments...

Postby Bob Bickerton » Thu Feb 27, 2020 11:11 am

M201 user here, just love it, but when I was more involved in live sound, the Sennheiser e614 was our go to mic for percussion etc. This fairly cheap SDC had a flat, tight response and I’m just wondering if it might do the trick in your situation.

Might be worth a try if you could borrow one.

Bob
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Re: The never ending marimba miking experiments...

Postby Mixedup » Thu Feb 27, 2020 12:04 pm

Sam Spoons wrote:Would I be right thinking that... a close miked cymbal recorded with a 201 sounds more like the live acoustic sound heard from a few metres away?

I love the M201 for so many things... but it depends what you mean by close. Setting aside the question of transients altogether for a moment — moving-coil dynamics can obviously work well on such sources if you want to 'auto-compress'... think 57 on a snare — don't forget to consider the M201's polar pattern and frequency response.

It's billed as 'hypercardioid'. But of course the pattern changes according to frequency. In practical terms I think it's almost cardioid around 100Hz, but grows increasingly directional as you move up the spectrum. The closer you get to the instrument, the more this is going to come into play, in terms of your ability to pick up the whole sound radiating from the instrument.

I think it's reputation as being 'snappy' or 'good on transients' for a dynamic mic probably stems from a combination of the compression characteristic Hugh has talked about, and the mic's frequency response — it's 1dB up from about 1.8 to 5 kHz, and a couple of dB up around 5-15 kHz. It's got quite a roll off at the bass end too, if you're far enough away that the proximity effect bass boost doesn't come into play. So while you're compressing transients a touch, the sound is a little tilted in favour of the brighter-sounding transients...
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Re: The never ending marimba miking experiments...

Postby The Elf » Thu Feb 27, 2020 12:25 pm

Have a clean pre with plenty of gain to hand - the M201 is thirsty for gain!
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Re: The never ending marimba miking experiments...

Postby Arpangel » Thu Feb 27, 2020 11:04 pm

Bob Bickerton wrote:M201 user here, just love it, but when I was more involved in live sound, the Sennheiser e614 was our go to mic for percussion etc. This fairly cheap SDC had a flat, tight response and I’m just wondering if it might do the trick in your situation.

Might be worth a try if you could borrow one.

Bob

Thanks, I’ll investigate the 614.
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