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The Twelve Steps for Recording Tapes into your computer

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Re: The Twelve Steps for Recording Tapes into your computer

PostPosted: Mon Sep 07, 2020 6:26 pm
by Hugh Robjohns
My BS alarm is very sensitive... :lol:

Re: The Twelve Steps for Recording Tapes into your computer

PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2020 8:58 am
by ken long
James Perrett wrote:Do you find you need to do this often?

In fairness, not often. But not unheard of.


However, I've found that most cassette machines have good access to the azimuth screw if you know where to look. Often you just need to slide off part of the door on front loading decks and most of mine have the door fronts permanently removed.

Yes, of course. I should have specified that adjustment to the screw can't happen on some decks while the cassette is engaged and playing. I might be thinking of some Denons here.

Re: The Twelve Steps for Recording Tapes into your computer

PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2020 9:00 am
by ken long
Tim Gillett wrote: Poking a screwdriver around always struck me as amateurish and even dangerous to the mech.

Never had a problem doing this with a driver so not sure how it can be amateurish but I guess YMMV. Whatever makes you more comfortable. If you prefer a big knob, by all means...

Re: The Twelve Steps for Recording Tapes into your computer

PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2020 10:52 am
by Tomás Mulcahy
ken long wrote:
Tim Gillett wrote: Poking a screwdriver around always struck me as amateurish and even dangerous to the mech.
Never had a problem doing this with a driver so not sure how it can be amateurish but I guess YMMV. Whatever makes you more comfortable.
Ditto.
ken long wrote:If you prefer a big knob, by all means...
:lol:

Re: The Twelve Steps for Recording Tapes into your computer

PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2020 3:53 pm
by Tim Gillett
ken long wrote:
Tim Gillett wrote: Poking a screwdriver around always struck me as amateurish and even dangerous to the mech.

Never had a problem doing this with a driver so not sure how it can be amateurish but I guess YMMV. Whatever makes you more comfortable. If you prefer a big knob, by all means...
I take it you adjust azimuth on every cassette you transfer. Would you prefer to have a front panel adjuster on your cassette deck?

Re: The Twelve Steps for Recording Tapes into your computer

PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2020 5:50 pm
by Tomás Mulcahy
Here we go, down the rabbit hole...

Re: The Twelve Steps for Recording Tapes into your computer

PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2020 8:56 pm
by Tim Gillett
ken long wrote:
Tim Gillett wrote: Poking a screwdriver around always struck me as amateurish and even dangerous to the mech.

Never had a problem doing this with a driver so not sure how it can be amateurish but I guess YMMV. Whatever makes you more comfortable. If you prefer a big knob, by all means...
True, to use a screwdriver and to consistently make the adjustment without damage requires concentration and skill not needed with a dedicated control, skill which you obviously have.

Re: The Twelve Steps for Recording Tapes into your computer

PostPosted: Tue Sep 08, 2020 10:21 pm
by Sam Spoons
The normal method of adjusting professional tape recorders is with a screwdriver. In a domestic/semi-pro environment frequent adjustment is not so necessary and the downside of having an accessible azimuth adjuster is the risk of people without the necessary skills messing up the adjustment. I'd suggest that if you have the skills to accurately adjust the asimuth you probably also have the skill to do so with a screwdriver without causing damage to the machine.

OTOH a skilled operator transferring a random assortment of tapes would definitely benefit from an easily accessible azimuth adjuster.

Re: The Twelve Steps for Recording Tapes into your computer

PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2020 10:24 am
by Tim Gillett
Quality cassette decks havent been made for many years. Parts and service these days can be hard to find, if not impossible. If there was still a significant demand for quality cassette decks, companies would still be making them. One of my concerns with Tomas's advice page is that while it mentions obtaining a quality cassette deck, presumably in good working order, it offers little help or advice in going about that.

I'm not sure what was the point of showing photos of exotic decks like the Nak Dragon and Revox B215 which are very hard to obtain, way beyond most peoples' budgets, and if they can be obtained may need extensive and costly repairs to get them working as they were designed, if that is possible. Finding a tech even prepared to work on them could be an exercise in itself. The Dragon has a very unusual and AFAIK unobtainable repro head.

Neither is it clear why we are shown pictures of Tomas's two Yamaha decks.

A list of more affordable middle of the road models from brands like Teac, Sony, Pioneer, and places where they might be serviced by competent technicians might have been more helpful.

Re: The Twelve Steps for Recording Tapes into your computer

PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2020 10:44 am
by blinddrew
The full half hour then...

Re: The Twelve Steps for Recording Tapes into your computer

PostPosted: Thu Sep 10, 2020 12:29 pm
by Hugh Robjohns
:bouncy:

Re: The Twelve Steps for Recording Tapes into your computer

PostPosted: Fri Sep 11, 2020 11:01 pm
by Tomás Mulcahy
blinddrew wrote:The full half hour then...
:lol: :lol: