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I've failed at becoming a commercial musician...

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Re: I've failed at becoming a commercial musician...

Postby Mike Stranks » Sun Jul 14, 2019 9:45 am

Spot on Eddy! :clap: :clap: :clap:
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Re: I've failed at becoming a commercial musician...

Postby forumuser918214 » Sun Jul 14, 2019 3:30 pm

You have "failure as a commercial musician" in common with nearly every musician out there. There is very little money in making music unless you are extremely talented, good looking, well-connected, or lucky. It is a great and rewarding hobby, though, and a fun social activity, and an opportunity to show off in public every once in a while.

Do you think all those "legendary producers" with crazy haircuts sitting in front of their computers that you on websites hawking software and hardware are really making a good living at it? It looks to me like most of them are sitting in their mom's spare bedroom.

Have fun with the music, and get a degree in engineering for money.
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Re: I've failed at becoming a commercial musician...

Postby OneWorld » Sun Jul 14, 2019 4:23 pm

Q - how do you make a $million of Jazz?

A - easy, start with $5million

Miles Davis

And I think the principle applies to much other music apart from jazz

A young up and coming artist who toured the clubs, night in night out, she'd built up a following, did all the right things said after all her hard work, hardly made a cent, then she started selling merchandise other than CDs merchandise such as t-shirts and after a year she was £15,000 up on the year before.

Even the guru SiCo said "most of what we sell is the same old crap, we just box it up more sexy though"

Whatever you do, if you like it, keep at it, but even Mozart got tossed into a Pauper's Grave :-(

I suppose you could always write a book on how not to do things, you'd have a large target audience, but then I guess the requisite skills would come naturally to us anyway :-)
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Re: I've failed at becoming a commercial musician...

Postby MOF » Sun Jul 14, 2019 6:13 pm

even Mozart got tossed into a Pauper's Grave :-(
If he’d had copyright protection, mechanical royalties, merchandising income, film synch payments plus stadium tours (bigger crowds than your average opera house) it might have been a different story.
There again, he could have developed an expensive lifestyle that outstripped all those income streams and still died poor.
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Re: I've failed at becoming a commercial musician...

Postby blinddrew » Sun Jul 14, 2019 7:40 pm

OneWorld wrote:I suppose you could always write a book on how not to do things, you'd have a large target audience, but then I guess the requisite skills would come naturally to us anyway :-)
David Ford has already written it. :)
It's a good read actually, 'I choose this. Or How I nearly made it in the music industry' is the full title if I recall correctly.
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Re: I've failed at becoming a commercial musician...

Postby Music Wolf » Mon Jul 15, 2019 10:27 am

Eddy Deegan wrote:
Music Wolf wrote:I for one shall be bitterly disappointed if 'Out to Sea' doesn't appear on the SOS Forum compilation album later this year.

Richard appears not to have been active online here (or anywhere else I could see after a cursory scan around) for the last couple of years. Since this thread was last active and in light of information received subsequently, I revised my view of him and came to the conclusion that he was always well meaning and doing his best.

As such, were he to resurface, and were he to wish to be included on the project then I would accept his contribution on the basis that his heart was in it.

Wherever he is and whatever he is doing now, I wish him well.

I too quickly came to the conclusion that Mr Steed was genuine. His music was not my particular beverage of choice but that didn't mean that it was any less worthy than my own efforts or those of many others here. In this last thread he was suggesting that, because he had failed to achieve commercial success, he was thinking of giving up. He just needed to come to terms with the fact that, whilst he was unlikely to achieve the success that he craved, making music can and should be its own reward. The SOS compilation would have been ideal for him.

It just bemuses me the way that these old threads pop up from time to time.
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Re: I've failed at becoming a commercial musician...

Postby Mike Stranks » Mon Jul 15, 2019 12:18 pm

Music Wolf wrote:
It just bemuses me the way that these old threads pop up from time to time.

My observations are that it's frequently a newbie who scans lots of threads, sees one they think they can offer something on and makes a comment - not realising that the thread has been moribund for several years. Then someone else who doesn't know the back-story comments on the most recent post or the thread in general and off we go! :)
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Re: I've failed at becoming a commercial musician...

Postby Music Wolf » Mon Jul 15, 2019 12:56 pm

Mike Stranks wrote:moribund

What a lovely word. I remember in Dennis Potter's 'The Singing Detective' that the author describes 'Elbow' as being the most beautiful word in the English language, not for it's meaning but for the shape that it makes in your mouth when you say it.

I think that 'Moribund' must push it close.

I shall endeavour to introduce it into conversation at some point today.
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Re: I've failed at becoming a commercial musician...

Postby ManFromGlass » Mon Jul 15, 2019 1:08 pm

I had a friend who thought the word "cake" was it. I’m fond of lugubrious, even though in print it looks kind of ugly, if that’s possible.
:)
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Re: I've failed at becoming a commercial musician...

Postby blinddrew » Mon Jul 15, 2019 4:08 pm

Lugubrious is a great word, my personal favourite, if such a thing is possible, is 'gnu'.
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Re: I've failed at becoming a commercial musician...

Postby MOF » Mon Jul 15, 2019 4:36 pm

Lugubrious is a great word, my personal favourite, if such a thing is possible, is 'gnu'.
Lugubrious is a woody word, gnu is on the verge of being a tinny word. Sorry just had to chip in with a bit of Monty Python there. :D
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Re: I've failed at becoming a commercial musician...

Postby Folderol » Mon Jul 15, 2019 4:43 pm

For me it was always 'Bifurcated' - but then I'm strange like that :beamup:

P.S.
Dad showed what a bifurcated rivet was when I was very young and impressionable.
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Re: I've failed at becoming a commercial musician...

Postby Elephone » Mon Jul 15, 2019 5:01 pm

forumuser918214 wrote:...unless you are extremely talented, good looking, well-connected, or lucky"

...extremely talented or good looking, ...

I don't think 'being a commercial musician' is something to go for directly anyway, especially not nowadays, unless you're extremely good-looking or in some way attractive.

If you're extremely talented, it'd probably turn out to be a waste of your talent unless it happens to match what's going on right now.

Even back in the 60's and 70's, if you read interviews with those who actually made it to some degree, they had a plan B. They didn't know how long pop music was going to last, let alone their own careers. Musicians like Little Richard and Chuck Berry were dripping in gold within months of making their first hits. But Chuck Berry kept up his painting & decorating business. Both of them never really moved on stylistically probably because their hits were all people wanted to hear.

Most musicians I know did sound engineering courses as a plan B or C, which must be why it's so hard to get those jobs as well.

Did you know that only a tiny percentage of classical pianists at top music schools actually make it? Imagine all that practicing?! That said, most of those who fail could probably blow some minds up close, so I don't know what they end up doing, maybe teaching(?)

I'd say, being an artist is probably equivalent. Nearly all fail. They make something that can't be duplicated and where the point is that it's an original work touched by the artist. Even art photographers tear up extremely expensive prints to keep existing ones valuable and unique. Music can't be touched and can be duplicated with 100% accuracy, so the closest they do is sell merchandise.

If my goal was to make a lot of money, I'd go for that directly in the most time-efficient way possible and do music in my free time. But even then, more than half of new businesses fail!
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Re: I've failed at becoming a commercial musician...

Postby Dave B » Tue Jul 16, 2019 8:24 am

Elephone wrote:Did you know that only a tiny percentage of classical pianists at top music schools actually make it? Imagine all that practicing?! That said, most of those who fail could probably blow some minds up close, so I don't know what they end up doing, maybe teaching(?)

In one particular case, a student was told to concentrate on his clarinet playing as he'd never make the grade to be a concert pianist. He went on to play for Cat Stevens, David Bowie, The Strawbs, Yes, have solo success ... and all it took was an aversion to barbers and a spangly cape!
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Re: I've failed at becoming a commercial musician...

Postby johnny h » Thu Jul 18, 2019 11:45 am

Synthman_ wrote:Actually I wont totally jack it in just yet. I want to try Ozone 7 because apparantly it allows me to get a true meter reading for mp3 format so ill be able to turned the switches up more to boost my productions for mp3 recordings.
Plus ,when I tried to turn up the mastering compression to boost the vocals, I heard wurring becasue my Aria is broke. I'll buy another one soon and give it another try.
When I read the above I was pretty sure it was an elaborate windup.

However, the productions appear to put so much effort into the wrong direction without any attempt at humour or parody, its hard to imagine what the motivation could be. Maybe we'll never know.
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Re: I've failed at becoming a commercial musician...

Postby Elephone » Fri Jul 19, 2019 9:11 pm

MOF wrote:
even Mozart got tossed into a Pauper's Grave :-(

This is one of those myths that people often deliberately perpetuate...

Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians: "Mozart was buried in a common grave, in accordance with contemporary Viennese custom, at the St. Marx Cemetery outside the city on 7 December [1791]."

'Common' graves were actually standard practice for the day unless you were aristocracy.

He was on the equivalent of £100K a year not long before he died and had excellent positions on offer had he lived. He was actually excellent at promoting himself, organised his own concerts, had tickets printed, and sold scores (via Artaria & Co of Vienna).

He was extravagant with clothes, instruments, parties, furniture, etc, ...he owned a billiard table and an Anton-Walter pianoforte ...but had dry patches where he had to borrow money.

His early death may have had more to do with the family's belief in blood-letting and other strange medical practices, e.g. use of quicksilver (mercury) to treat a fever.
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