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Reference content.

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Reference content.

Postby Zukan » Mon Dec 31, 2018 12:45 pm

I often see posts with members asking what are the best genre specific references to use for referencing?

I generally don't bother with too much genre specific references as I prefer broadband references and with that in mind I use Devdas which is a wonderful Bollywood film score album that has content from solo percussive played lines to full on orchestral and electronic mixes. I find that it covers all the bases for me.

Apart from that I use Sentinel by Trevor Horn as my daily mix referencing or for monitor calibration in my room.

Pray, what do you use and why?
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Re: Reference content.

Postby Bob Bickerton » Mon Dec 31, 2018 1:04 pm

In general? For me tracks 2 and 3 off Herbie Hancock’s Gershwin album. Beautifully recorded, wide frequency range and lots of space to hear different elements. I know them inside out and so I’m able to assess and tweak system EQ accordingly.

My assessment goes something along the lines of: What’s happening with the mids on the piano? How controlled is the gnarly trumpet on track 2? How are the vocals being represented on track 3. Where does the kick sit in track 3? And so it goes on........

Regarding referencing genre specific for direct comparison of what I’ve recorded, I’ll search for something similar on iTunes and A/B.

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Re: Reference content.

Postby The Elf » Mon Dec 31, 2018 1:06 pm

I prefer to use references that are pleasing to listen to, but sometimes you have to put up with some garbage to find the gems within...

I often use American country/rock. Some of the guys over there have a knack for making every instrument push through the mix, and balancing crispness with depth. Some of the early Taylor Swift and Rascal Flatts material is very well produced to my ears. There's also the 'wall of sound' of the likes of Seventh Key and Slamer that epitomises a balance I aspire to.

I use a few Carpenters songs to convince myself I'm not over-cooking the vocals!

Oh, and practically anything produced by Paul Northfield, of course! ;)

I don't really need to stick to a narrow selection of references these days, since I have all of my music on my NAS and available in a few clicks, any time, any place.
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Re: Reference content.

Postby Martin Walker » Mon Dec 31, 2018 1:12 pm

I tend to use a lot of well-known snippets for different auditioning purposes, such as Tom's Diner for dry-ish vocals, Yello's The Race (for separation), Bird On a Wire, Steely Dan, Tina Turner, plus a wide range of modern electronica to check the bass end, which can vary SO much from album to album and genre to genre.

Some are really warm, deep and hart-hitting (think of Eric Persing's bass end in Specrasonics, or Tipper), while I've been amazed at just how little low end there is in much of the 70s rock material (I suspect many of the studios had overblown Westlake monitors). Yes and ELP are classic examples!


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Re: Reference content.

Postby The Elf » Mon Dec 31, 2018 1:24 pm

Martin Walker wrote:Yes and ELP are classic examples!
Try Steven Wilson's Yes remixes - finally, there's some bass in there!

Oh, for an opportunity to re-mix a couple of 70s albums of my choosing (you know where I am, guys!)... :ugeek: :angel:
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Re: Reference content.

Postby Watchmaker » Mon Dec 31, 2018 2:18 pm

I've been using Lucinda Williams' "Blessed" a lot lately but that's because I've been doing a bit of Country/Nashville style stuff. I love the texture on that record.

Mostly it depends on where I'm trying to go...am I learning the room or trying to finish the mix.
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Re: Reference content.

Postby ManFromGlass » Mon Dec 31, 2018 2:53 pm

I use a Steely Dan (from Aja I think). A Bjork track from the geisha picture cd as a track has a white noise snare that never sounds the same on any monitors. A track from Zappa’s Yellow Shark. The one where he walks across the stage to the mic. Just the theatre ambience and footsteps on the stage sound glorious on the right monitors.
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Re: Reference content.

Postby Dave B » Mon Dec 31, 2018 3:10 pm

Another vote for Yello - in my case it's anything of the Baby album. That album is crisp and clear so is brilliant at showing up any strange lumps or dips in the monitors. I recently checked out some live tops with Jellyfish's Spilt Milk album if anyone wants a more modern take on the 70s sound (lovely full bottom end and high vocal harmonies).

But then I suppose that a good reference track is anything that you know well. Years ago I once found that a studio was mixing rock with almost no top end (he was a dub engineer) as I used Spinal Tap's Break Like The Wind album as a reference. :)
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