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Spending Choices - Strategy

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Spending Choices - Strategy

Postby dbfs » Wed Jun 19, 2019 1:32 pm

Hi Folks,

Yesterday AVID have announced a new pricing strategy that essentially tries to encourage Perpetual users to move to Subscription by doubling the annual update charge to perpetual users.
https://www.pro-tools-expert.com/home-p ... rade-plans

Since many seem to dislike this move then would the following not make sense.

* Keep your perpetual Pro Tools license as it will no doubt be use-full for opening old projects.
* Update your Perpetual license plan before July at cost of €100 if you want to stick with it for a while longer and keep your options open.
* Live with your operating system and DAW for 3 years and just relax.
* In the meantime, slowly start moving towards another more affordable solution such as Reaper

The internet is awash with stories of people who have abandoned other days for Reaper and never looked back.

I know, some will say YOU NEED PRO TOOLs. It's the INDUSTRY STANDARD.

To me the argument that the big studios use Pro Tools and that's the main reason that you should use it seems flawed to me for the following reasons.

1 – WHAT INDUSTRY
The decline of the Big commercial studios seems be unstoppable due to property costs etc.
If this is true then why are home users and musicians trying to remain compatible with those professional production studios?

2 – HOW LIKELY
How often do clients come to the average user with a Pro Tools session from a large studios for editing, mixing and mastering. Worst case scenario you could take out a 1 month subscription to access he session files if stuck.

3 – COMPATIBILITY
These days most DAWS support file export and import in terms of raw audio stems, OMF and AAF. If so then why would you average user get all bothered about being compatible with any one DAW.

4 – WHY UPDATE ANYTHING
Lastly, Why do people get hung up on DAW and OS updates. I mean if you have a working DAW in your home studio that enables you to record, mix and master music then why fall foul to marketing pressures to update everything at considerable cost and annoyance. Especially since you often read that pro engineers and studios often hold off from such changes for reliability reasons.
I recently considered the annual mac OSX update cycle and asked myself when was the last time that I updated a version of OSX because it brought me an advantage or new feature that enhanced my audio efforts. NEVER.

The whole thing is bonkers in my view. I say in the whole modern world of cloud everything, social networking operating system and system updates the happiest and perhaps most productive folks might be the ones who get a system up and running, create a backup of it and then disconnect from all the nonsense.

I know that of course, someone will chime in now and say that those working in Post need pro tools. Fair enough. If you work in Film or TV the maybe the choice is not yours to make. If that is the case then don't stress, if it's not your call then it's not your call.

Just some thoughts. I might even keep up my annual update plan. I am not saying everyone should abandon Pro Tools. If it works for you and you make a few quid using it then why not pay. But there are other options out there so there is no real reason to keep paying for something if you don't feel comfortable with the subscription model.

Something I have started doing when I consider buying updates and taking advantage of plugins offers is asking myself the following question:

"Do I really need this. Can I use this money to do something nice with/for the kids/wife/parents instead". It really works to focus the mind and makes for a happier life.

Cheers.
dbfs
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Re: Spending Choices - Strategy

Postby Jack Ruston » Thu Jun 20, 2019 6:33 am

Quite frankly, Avid, over the past few years, have lost the plot. They've slowly but surely allowed pro tools to slip from what was a solid top spot for most users, to some sort of murky position in the middle of 'well I need to be compatible'-world, firing or alienating the talent that got Digidesign to the dizzying heights of its late 90s early 00s glory.

Having used it for 25 years, and become increasingly frustrated, I moved to Reaper. I love reaper.

But

It's not Pro Tools. It's better in some ways, and worse in others.

It's not the same mentality or work flow.

You can't open PT sessions

There is a learning curve. A steep one.

If you're working constantly in studios with pro tools, you just want to be able to fly around on that, and not lose your match fitness.

I'm not doing that these days. I've stopped accepting engineering gigs in town, and so I don't need to use it so much. Reaper suits me perfectly, and it gets me where I need to go. I'd gladly pay the license five times over.

So...it depends. But I do think there's more room than ever before for a variety of software. Lots of people are working on Abelton, Reaper, Logic obviously, nuendo, cubase. But you won't find any of them as the primary DAW in a commercial room. Yet.

J
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Re: Spending Choices - Strategy

Postby CS70 » Thu Jun 20, 2019 7:55 am

dbfs wrote:
4 – WHY UPDATE ANYTHING
Lastly, Why do people get hung up on DAW and OS updates. I mean if you have a working DAW in your home studio that enables you to record, mix and master music then why fall foul to marketing pressures to update everything at considerable cost and annoyance. Especially since you often read that pro engineers and studios often hold off from such changes for reliability reasons.
I recently considered the annual mac OSX update cycle and asked myself when was the last time that I updated a version of OSX because it brought me an advantage or new feature that enhanced my audio efforts. NEVER.

The whole thing is bonkers in my view. I say in the whole modern world of cloud everything, social networking operating system and system updates the happiest and perhaps most productive folks might be the ones who get a system up and running, create a backup of it and then disconnect from all the nonsense.

I agree with the general idea you want to convey, but it's all about context. As a professional you may take decisions different than the ones taken by the interested hobbyist. The latter does it for fun, and fun is the hook used by any company which operates in the consumer market. And most people using DAWs (or guitars ;-) ) are hobbyists, not professionals.

Also, dunno for PT, but for the software I use (from Windows to Cakewalk etc) new versions bring something well worth having more often than not. Sure, sometimes they may introduce some instability, but generally it's a price worth paying for the improvements. Otherwise, why not using MS-DOS or a PDP-11? Rock solid stuff, that one. :-)

I don't think there's a ploy to burden users with useless crap. Companies want to make money, and they ask their engineering divisions to invent stuff that can be sold because it's useful to their customers. The management department decides how to market and price them. The marketing department tries to come up with ideas to compel people to buy them. Sometimes all these divisions may get it wrong, sure. Sometimes one division takes the upper hand, with disastrous results. But in the end the productivity (or lack thereof) of someone using a DAW is up to him/herself, not the tool or the upgrades.
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