You are here

Monitors

For everything after the recording stage: hardware/software and how you use it.

Monitors

Postby jimh76 » Wed Sep 18, 2019 7:05 pm

Hi,

I own a set of tannoy reveal active monitors which I have had about 10 years now and I recently find my mixes don't seem to translate as well as they used to

I'm not sure if this is me or them. I really struggle to hear reverb on them and find that I add too much. I don't think I had this issue before.

My question is this, do monitors have a shelf life, as they still seem to work ok (the woofer and tweeter are all still working) and nothing has "gone" but it just doesn't seem the same? If so any recommendations. Would you buy second hand?

Cheers.

Jim
jimh76
Poster
Posts: 42
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2018 10:29 am

Re: Monitors

Postby James Perrett » Wed Sep 18, 2019 8:16 pm

Speakers don't really have a shelf life although some types that use foam surrounds will need replacement foam every 20-30 years. However, some problems are hard to detect by just listening to normal music so it may be worth feeding a swept sine wave (from a low distortion source) through them at low level and seeing if you hear any issues. If a voice coil is rubbing slightly it may respond to high level signals but not to low level ambience signals and the swept sine wave test would be more likely to pick this up.

I wouldn't have expected any electrolytic capacitors to have changed value in only 10 years but it is possible that there is a duff capacitor somewhere which has caused a problem. However, I would expect only one monitor to be affected by a problem like this.

Another possibility is that, if you have changed your room layout, your current layout isn't as acoustically good as your previous layout and you may need some acoustic treatment.
User avatar
James Perrett
Moderator
Posts: 8451
Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2001 12:00 am
Location: The wilds of Hampshire
JRP Music - Audio Mastering and Restoration. JRP Music Facebook Page

Re: Monitors

Postby Wonks » Wed Sep 18, 2019 8:32 pm

And of course a sine wave sweep will also highlight any room mode issues, so you need to be able to try and differentiate between the two - try and repeat the test in another room for any problem frequencies.

One other variable is your hearing. You may simply have a lower upper frequency limit compared to 10 years ago - it's almost inevitable. Probably worth having a hearing test to see what's what.
User avatar
Wonks
Jedi Poster
Posts: 9556
Joined: Thu May 29, 2003 12:00 am
Location: Reading, UK
Correcting mistakes on the internet since 1853

Re: Monitors

Postby Sam Spoons » Wed Sep 18, 2019 10:17 pm

Wonks wrote:One other variable is your hearing. You may simply have a lower upper frequency limit compared to 10 years ago - it's almost inevitable. Probably worth having a hearing test to see what's what.


+1, I have definitely got this going on, along with slight tinnitus.
User avatar
Sam Spoons
Jedi Poster
Posts: 10234
Joined: Thu Jan 23, 2003 1:00 am
Location: Manchester UK
Finally taking this recording lark seriously (and recording my Gypsy Jazz CD)........

Re: Monitors

Postby jimh76 » Thu Sep 19, 2019 5:12 pm

Cheers guys.

They say that you lose 1kHz from the 20kHz for every decade. I'd be about 15kHz now.....:o(
jimh76
Poster
Posts: 42
Joined: Fri Aug 10, 2018 10:29 am

Re: Monitors

Postby blinddrew » Thu Sep 19, 2019 8:27 pm

I'm down to about 14.5kHz at 45...

EDIT no, wait, I'm only 44, my mistake. But not 44.1 ;)
User avatar
blinddrew
Jedi Poster
Posts: 8160
Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2015 12:00 am
Location: York
Ignore the post count, I have no idea what I'm doing...


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: nsalzman