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Single core versus Multicore CPU

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Single core versus Multicore CPU

Postby JacoVanDuijn » Tue Nov 26, 2019 8:22 pm

Hello Everyone,

I am a long time lurker but have been banging my head, cause I can't seem to find an answer.

I have always thought that Multi-core CPU's where better (for Video editing, etc everything non-gaming related) for audio production. But I read that single core performance is better.

Which one is true?

And are their DAWS out there that make use of multi-core? (I read that in the new studio one 4.5 they support multi-core, but not how many. I wanted to ask this on the presonus forums, but I don't have Studio one to register).

I am about to buy a new pc and really don't know what to get. I was first going for the Ryzen 3950x, untill I read about the importance of single core performance.

I hope you people can help me out.

With Kind regards,
Jaco
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Re: Single core versus Multicore CPU

Postby Eddy Deegan » Wed Nov 27, 2019 12:24 am

JacoVanDuijn wrote:I am a long time lurker

Welcome to the glare above the parapet ;)

I have always thought that Multi-core CPU's where better (for Video editing, etc everything non-gaming related) for audio production. But I read that single core performance is better.

Are you sure you read that right? There may be advice out there to disable hyper-threading on certain Intel CPUs due to the issues associated with the various CPU hardware bugs that surfaced a while back but generally speaking more cores is better when it comes to video editing.

And are their DAWS out there that make use of multi-core? (I read that in the new studio one 4.5 they support multi-core, but not how many.

All DAWs should support multiple cores, but I would be surprised if any of them have a specific number of cores they support. What happens is that they use threads and/or processes which can run simultaneously. The OS that the DAW runs on, as well as the CPU itself, will handle the allocation of resources accordingly.

It's perfectly normal for hundreds, or even thousands, of threads to be present on the system although deep down at the hardware level the CPU is only paying attention to a few of them at a time.

The number of threads it can actually execute simultaneously depends on the number of cores and whether or not hardware support for threading is disabled on the chip. If the chip supports threading in hardware (AMD and Intel use different terminology but the effect is much the same) and it is enabled, then it will typically be able to pay attention to twice as many threads as there are cores at any given instant in time. If threading is disabled then you'll get one thread per core.

This is of little concern to most people for most purposes because the specific threads that are being executed at any instant constantly change as the scheduler in the OS executes a bit of a small number of threads, then suspends them to execute a bit of some other threads, and so on. All this happens so quickly (hundreds or thousands of times a second depending on the CPU and the OS) that the illusion of many things happening at once is achieved almost seamlessly, even though only a small number of threads are active at any one moment.

Here, for example is some of the workload that my laptop is performing right now:

Image

You'll see it's showing a lot of CPUs on the right (specifically 8), but this is only a quad core i7 CPU. When threading is enabled (Intel call it "hyper-threading") the CPU appears to have twice as many cores as it really has, which is why there are 8 of them on mine.

Note the number of threads listed against each process. Although only 8 of them are actually executing at any given instant, all of them appear to be executing to me much like there are no actual moving images in a film; it's just a rapid succession of static frames that deceive the eye.

I am about to buy a new pc and really don't know what to get. I was first going for the Ryzen 3950x, untill I read about the importance of single core performance.

I'm still semi-convinced that you've misunderstood the article a little bit, and that it's recommending that hardware support for threads is disabled due to the performance-related issues associated with the security patches for the hardware bugs found mainly in the Intel chips. AMDs are (as far as I know, I've not been paying much attention lately) less affected, and new hardware should be unaffected altogether.

In short, I'd not worry about the 'single core' business at all. I promise you you do not want a PC with a single core in it (not that you could probably find one anyway). Just get a modern PC with an up-to-date multiple-core CPU in it and have fun using it :-)
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Re: Single core versus Multicore CPU

Postby miN2 » Wed Nov 27, 2019 8:07 am

That said, high frequency is beneficial for audio in respect of DSP and voices, so whilst you don't want to consider a single-core CPU as it'll just be all over bad in comparison to modern day alternatives, you also don't want to sacrifice too much speed for additional cores. High frequency and lots of cores/threads is generally the best bet for many things audio. As such, it's more of a balance you're looking for. It would be beneficial to look at Scan's benchmark graphs for audio work.

Re Studio One: it supports multi-core, but they took serious time implementing it to a half-way decent standard in my view, and it still doesn't really hold a candle to the likes of Cakewalk and Cubase. No idea what their problem is, although i do wonder if maybe it's due to not being written in C and C++ so they're having trouble? I've got a feeling it's written in Crystal, but i don't know so don't quote me it :headbang:
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Re: Single core versus Multicore CPU

Postby merlyn » Wed Nov 27, 2019 10:46 am

The Ryzen 3950x looks like a powerful chip.

I would interpret your question to mean : "Should I go for a chip with a higher base clock and less cores?"

It depends what you want to do. The DAW I use -- Ardour can definitely use multiple cores. To use all available cores there needs to be more independent tracks than cores meaning the output of one track doesn't depend on any other track.

A signal flow of Input > PluginA > PluginB > ... > PluginZ > Output will be processed on one thread and that's where single-thread performance will be a factor because the input of the next plugin in the chain depends on the output of the previous plugin.

Multiple tracks can be processed on multiple threads.

So for an application like using a computer live as an effects processor where low latency with several plugins on one track is the goal single-thread performance will be important. For an application like mixing a large project with many tracks all with plugins multiple cores will help.
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Re: Single core versus Multicore CPU

Postby Folderol » Wed Nov 27, 2019 11:35 am

Don't worry about it!
I'm using a 1st Gen 4 core Ryzen (bought from Scan) with a soft-synth that can put a serious load on it, yet I haven't even found the sides yet, let alone hitting them :lol:

The problem with benchmark tests is that they tell you how well something performs... on benchmarks!
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Re: Single core versus Multicore CPU

Postby CS70 » Wed Nov 27, 2019 11:58 am

There are a cases where having more cores might hinder performance, since when running multiple threads competition for shared resources increases... but generally that's either a software design flaw, a side effect of naive programming or a little too eager application consolidation on server nodes in a cluster. An easy example would be multiple threads doing blocking I/O instead of non-blocking, where increasing the number of threads that can run concurrently can cause so much more overhead in the OS that things actually slow down. I've seen that kind of stuff recently in some big data applications running on high performance clusters.

DAWs and NLEs, if well coded, shouldn't really suffer from this kind of things.
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Re: Single core versus Multicore CPU

Postby JacoVanDuijn » Fri Nov 29, 2019 1:24 am


Welcome to the glare above the parapet ;)


Thank you very much and thank you for taking the time to write all of that very important info.

merlyn wrote:The Ryzen 3950x looks like a powerful chip.
I would interpret your question to mean : "Should I go for a chip with a higher base clock and less cores?"

This is exactly what I mean. Thank you for clarifying.

this is more of a personal thick, but when I get something I want it to be as good as possible within my budget and it to last for 10 years. My previous build has now come to an end.

There is for example a intel Core i9-9900KS that has 5.0ghz. So if single core is more important I would go for that. If multi-cores are better for performance I would go for the Ryzen 3950x.

CS70 wrote:There are a cases where having more cores might hinder performance, since when running multiple threads competition for shared resources increases... but generally that's either a software design flaw, a side effect of naive programming or a little too eager application consolidation on server nodes in a cluster.

Software design is of course a major factor. I don't yet own studio one, but I tried it and I want to get that DAW, and am glad there is a new update that will support multi-core.

So I should go for the Ryzen 3950x?

Thank you CS70, Folderol, Merlyn, Min2 and Eddy Deegan,
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Re: Single core versus Multicore CPU

Postby merlyn » Fri Nov 29, 2019 2:41 pm

The R9 3900x looks good with a slightly faster base clock of 3.8 GHz versus the 3.5 GHz of the 3950x.

The base clock is more relevant for audio. It's a big sneaky of manufacturers and retailers to use the boost clock as the headline figure.

It depends how you define performance, but clock speed and number of cores are relevant.
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Re: Single core versus Multicore CPU

Postby JacoVanDuijn » Sat Nov 30, 2019 12:10 am

merlyn wrote:The R9 3900x looks good with a slightly faster base clock of 3.8 GHz versus the 3.5 GHz of the 3950x.

The base clock is more relevant for audio. It's a big sneaky of manufacturers and retailers to use the boost clock as the headline figure.

It depends how you define performance, but clock speed and number of cores are relevant.

Thank you again.

What is the reason that base clock is more important?

Jaco
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Re: Single core versus Multicore CPU

Postby Eddy Deegan » Sat Nov 30, 2019 1:08 am

JacoVanDuijn wrote:What is the reason that base clock is more important?

Some things require a single core to process, even though in the wider sense the computer can do a lot more with multiple cores.

Higher clock speed gets more done in a single core than woud otherwise be possible. Under the hood, the CPU will transfer single-core workloads between physical cores on the chip because when working the CPU heats up, which leads to performance degradation.

Even if you are running a task that requires only a single core, the CPU will pick the coolest/least busy core to do that work, and then when it inevitably heats up it will transfer that work, while the job is running, to a cooler core to maintain best performance.

Thus, even for single core tasks a higher base clock will allow you to get more done in a multi-core CPU than would otherwise be possible as it can transfer the work to a cooler core now and again. Much like a relay race is run by one person at a time, but when they get tired they pass the baton to the next team member to continue.
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Re: Single core versus Multicore CPU

Postby merlyn » Sat Nov 30, 2019 1:55 am

Adding to what Eddy said --

Turbo Boost can't be sustained indefinitely. The base clock is what can be sustained indefinitely.

The i9 9900KS looks like a chip aimed at gamers. In gaming Turbo Boost makes sense because the load goes up and down. For audio I have found the sustained performance more important. That's why e.g. CPU power management is disabled and the computer is run at full tilt all the time.

If you've had your present system a while I think, as Folderol pointed out, that you'll be stunned at how powerful these new chips are. :)
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Re: Single core versus Multicore CPU

Postby miN2 » Sat Nov 30, 2019 9:10 am

merlyn wrote:Turbo Boost can't be sustained indefinitely.

Turbo boost requires sufficient power and cooling available to maintain the boost. If the system has this is can be maintained indefinitely.
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Re: Single core versus Multicore CPU

Postby merlyn » Sat Nov 30, 2019 1:06 pm

miN2 wrote:Turbo boost requires sufficient power and cooling available to maintain the boost. If the system has this is can be maintained indefinitely.

Would a stock cooler do that?

What chip would you go for? Out of the high end choices on this thread I'd go for a Ryzen 3900x because it has speed and cores.

@JacoVanDujin Put simply clock speed gives low latency and more plugins on one track. More cores gives more tracks or virtual instruments.
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Re: Single core versus Multicore CPU

Postby wireman » Sun Dec 01, 2019 12:36 pm

Eddy Deegan wrote:Higher clock speed gets more done in a single core than woud otherwise be possible. Under the hood, the CPU will transfer single-core workloads between physical cores on the chip because when working the CPU heats up, which leads to performance degradation.

Even if you are running a task that requires only a single core, the CPU will pick the coolest/least busy core to do that work, and then when it inevitably heats up it will transfer that work, while the job is running, to a cooler core to maintain best performance.

Could you provide a reference for this please? Older CPUs had thermal control that affected all cores at once and I would have thought core binding was under control of the OS and thermal considerations would not be part of the scheduling decision.
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Re: Single core versus Multicore CPU

Postby Folderol » Sun Dec 01, 2019 1:14 pm

wireman wrote:
Eddy Deegan wrote:Higher clock speed gets more done in a single core than woud otherwise be possible. Under the hood, the CPU will transfer single-core workloads between physical cores on the chip because when working the CPU heats up, which leads to performance degradation.

Even if you are running a task that requires only a single core, the CPU will pick the coolest/least busy core to do that work, and then when it inevitably heats up it will transfer that work, while the job is running, to a cooler core to maintain best performance.

Could you provide a reference for this please? Older CPUs had thermal control that affected all cores at once and I would have thought core binding was under control of the OS and thermal considerations would not be part of the scheduling decision.

I can't give you a reference, but I have seen this core swapping in action. I have a bit of software that monitors individual cores, and you can watch the work load being swapped around between them. It's definitely under firmware control. There is nothing in the OS that does this.
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