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How to test headphones to see how neutral they are + how to compensate the subjectivity of my ears?

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Re: How to test headphones to see how neutral they are + how to compensate the subjectivity of my ears?

Postby Sam Spoons » Thu Apr 09, 2020 6:33 pm

IAA wrote:
Drop a few short examples here and there are plenty of good ears that can help you!

That is your problem sorted! There are some mighty golden ears on these forums. Mine are nearer brass I think :wtf:
:D mine are tin.....
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Re: How to test headphones to see how neutral they are + how to compensate the subjectivity of my ears?

Postby CS70 » Thu Apr 09, 2020 6:45 pm

If you have a smartphone, there's a perfect additional reference for you. If you have a car, there's another really good one. An MP3 player. Some cheap earbuds. A friends' hi-fi.. you may have available more playback systems that you know of. :-)

The only thing you may have trouble checking is how your mix feels in a full range loud PA system - like the ones used in discos and so on.
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Reference

Postby DanDan » Tue Apr 14, 2020 11:20 pm

I too have been pretty nomadic and found the different tonality in Pro Studios really disturbing. I may go into that later, perhaps in a magazine article...... The title would be something like Flat is useless........
Reference Tracks, even just one, are invaluable. I am a bit chuffed that our Hugh included one of my tracks for inclusion on his recommended Reference CD. With Reference tracks and Reference headphones, on can tell reliably if the local playback system is in the ballpark. And adjust it if not. In many Pro CR's I find it necessary to turn down the HF.
You could buy Audiometric Headphones. They should present all frequencies equally at the ear. This however is in no way similar to what speakers in domestic rooms sound like.
So..... best buy headphones which sound like speakers in a room. These would have something like the Bruel and Kjaer curve. Simply put a slope from LF to HF downwards by about 6dB. I still use my life long partners, Sennheiser HD280s. I have quite a few others, Sony Beyer, and Sennheiser HD5XX and HD650
They are all quite similar to the tonal balance of my KH310 speakers in an almost anechoic Control Room. This is in turn very similar to the tonality in several different rooms here on several different systems. Note all my best cans are open back.
Tonality is one thing, but speakers and headphones handle panning very differently. Goodhertz have addressed this extremely well IMO with their Canopener Plug in.
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Re: How to test headphones to see how neutral they are + how to compensate the subjectivity of my ears?

Postby 10K-DB Music » Thu Apr 23, 2020 12:14 am

Ive really grown to like the Sony 7506 phones,,pretty much flat,,so I can hear whats really been recorded.
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