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Using Reaper to smooth out peaks?

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Re: Using Reaper to smooth out peaks?

PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 2:04 pm
by permanent_daylight
It can be annoying at times for sure.
But then it may be equally annoying if for every clean split it didn't cut at where you told it to cut.

Especially over looped parts, I've never been able to get the auto crossfade on that right either, so I avoid it to copy+paste many times instead.

One thing is if you do this in bulk, you CAN select all the splits and then it will drag them all into a crossfade simultaneously.

TURNING crossfade off to split is also a no as you will get the click glitch sound as familiar for unfaded audio.

There are many options however and reaper is highly customisable. I've never explored macros, commands or whatever. It usually can do anything you want but through a complicated question of "how???"

And usually MY answer is 'manually' or workaround.

Re: Using Reaper to smooth out peaks?

PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 2:39 pm
by Hugh Robjohns
permanent_daylight wrote:But then it may be equally annoying if for every clean split it didn't cut at where you told it to cut.

The midle of the crossfade should be at the chosen edit point.

Which means for a clean split, the fade-out starts a couple of missliseconds early and finishes a couple of millieconds late. I've never once found that to be a problem... but if it ever was, it would be trivial to slide the output point a tad earlier/later, as required, or reduce the fade-out duration.

I'd certainly take that as an very occasional requirement over having to faff about to create crossfades at every single edit point....

Re: Using Reaper to smooth out peaks?

PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 2:58 pm
by James Perrett
Hugh Robjohns wrote:
James Perrett wrote:Before I posted my instructions I checked and my copy of Reaper automatically does a crossfade on split points without the need to manually create a crossfade. Now I'm not sure whether that's something I've changed or a default but, if it isn't a default, it would be sensible to make it a default setting in your default template.

It's not a default action, that's for sure, and I can't see an option for it in the preferences (although that doesn't mean it's not there hidden away somewhere)... However, I suspect you've written a macro or something to do this.

I'm fairly sure that I've never written any macros for this so it is an option somewhere. I've just tried my stand-alone copy of version 6 and that doesn't crossfade so I'll see if I can work out how to do this.

Re: Using Reaper to smooth out peaks?

PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 3:08 pm
by James Perrett
Hugh Robjohns wrote:It's not a default action, that's for sure, and I can't see an option for it in the preferences (although that doesn't mean it's not there hidden away somewhere)... However, I suspect you've written a macro or something to do this.

Found it!

Go to Options->Preferences->Project->Media Item Defaults and tick the box next to Overlap and crossfade items when splitting, length:

You can also choose the crossfade length, the crossfade shape and whether you want to allow different fade shapes for each side of the edit.

Re: Using Reaper to smooth out peaks?

PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 3:31 pm
by blinddrew
James has, once again, beaten me to it. :)

Re: Using Reaper to smooth out peaks?

PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 4:41 pm
by Mike Stranks
Hugh Robjohns wrote:I never edit audio in Reaper -- I always use SADiE and I'd forgotten why until this came up: Repear's default action appears to cut a hole at every edit point by fading down to silence and back up again, so it's no wonder that edits can't be made to work properly!

Aahh! I thought it might just be me... :)

Although I don't use Reaper - or SADiE - I have my DAW set-up so that if I want to do anything but the crudest of 'chop that chunk out' stuff I flip into my editing software - completely different package. That allows me to do all sorts of stuff that, I suspect, I couldn't even contemplate in the DAW. Horses for courses.

And of course, I'm not mainstream at all. Much of what I'm doing is tidying pre-recorded audio, prior to processing and mixing various elements in the DAW to produce either a radio prog/podcast or a soundtrack to which pictures will subsequently be added.

Re: Using Reaper to smooth out peaks?

PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 5:18 pm
by Sam Spoons
I do use Reaper, many years ago Wavelab was my goto stereo editing software but since going over to Mac's I haven't used WL. I haven't missed it a bit as I find Reaper does everything I could wish for and is just as easy to use. Makes my life simpler too using just one audio app for everything.

That crossfade tip is something I will use in future though :thumbup:

Re: Using Reaper to smooth out peaks?

PostPosted: Sun Apr 05, 2020 5:24 pm
by Hugh Robjohns
James Perrett wrote:Found it!

Go to Options->Preferences->Project->Media Item Defaults and tick the box next to Overlap and crossfade items when splitting, length:

Brilliant -- well found. I thought I'd been through that menu, but obviously not! That does the trick. Thanks James. :D (I'll still be doing most of my editing in SADiE, but it's nice to know Reaper would be a realistic alternative now.)

Re: Using Reaper to smooth out peaks?

PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2020 7:44 am
by Arpangel
Hugh Robjohns wrote:
James Perrett wrote:Before I posted my instructions I checked and my copy of Reaper automatically does a crossfade on split points without the need to manually create a crossfade. Now I'm not sure whether that's something I've changed or a default but, if it isn't a default, it would be sensible to make it a default setting in your default template.

It's not a default action, that's for sure, and I can't see an option for it in the preferences (although that doesn't mean it's not there hidden away somewhere)... However, I suspect you've written a macro or something to do this.

I never edit audio in Reaper -- I always use SADiE and I'd forgotten why until this came up: Repear's default action appears to cut a hole at every edit point by fading down to silence and back up again, so it's no wonder that edits can't be made to work properly!

Sadie? Yes, I know a couple of friends that still use it. It’s favoured by classical engineers for note-for-note editing.
But I’ll check my settings in Reaper, and change them now if necessary.

Re: Using Reaper to smooth out peaks?

PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2020 10:50 am
by Hugh Robjohns
Arpangel wrote:Sadie? Yes, I know a couple of friends that still use it. It’s favoured by classical engineers for note-for-note editing.

And by a lot of mastering houses, and by a lot of location recording engineers... It's just been updated to 6.1.8 as well...

Re: Using Reaper to smooth out peaks?

PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2020 11:59 am
by Arpangel
Hugh Robjohns wrote:
Arpangel wrote:Sadie? Yes, I know a couple of friends that still use it. It’s favoured by classical engineers for note-for-note editing.

And by a lot of mastering houses, and by a lot of location recording engineers... It's just been updated to 6.1.8 as well...

Is purely popular because of its editing capability, or is it something to do with quality as well?

Re: Using Reaper to smooth out peaks?

PostPosted: Mon Apr 06, 2020 1:59 pm
by Hugh Robjohns
It's a very precise and extremely versatile audio editing platform which is relatively easy to learn. It was also amongst the first to incorporate comprehensive CD editing/mastering facilities (including DDP output formats). It has always been considered to uphold the highest audio quality, and for a while it was one of the few DAWs that could edit DSD material natively.

It's also considered a very good platform for radio/TV audio production /post-production work. (It makes podcasting a doddle, too!)

And the location recording hardware -- the LRX2 -- is extremely high quality and capable, with more integrated facilities than most USB2 interfaces. Arguably overshadowed now by some of the more recent portable digital recorders, but there aren't many lap-top sized USB2 interfaces that can record 64 channels, with user-configurable I/O cards (including superb mic preamps), plus hardware moving faders and transport controls.

It remains the high-end editor-of-choice for BBC Radio production work and it is fully integrated into their VCS DiraNG playout system. A number of other major broadcasters around the world also use it.

H