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To all who work with choirs - to high pass or not to high pass?

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Re: To all who work with choirs - to high pass or not to high pass?

Postby Sam Spoons » Wed Feb 24, 2021 10:12 pm

The Elf wrote:
george_vel wrote:
Sam Spoons wrote:Ah, somebody said it on YouTube so it must be true :oops: :D :D :D
Actually, I’ve doubted to be true. And just double checking it with you here. :mrgreen:
:clap: :thumbup:

I wasn't questioning you, my friend, just the source.

I think it was a 'fly away' comment by the presenter and probably not meant to stand up to detailed scrutiny. The dialogue didn't sound scripted (accepted that the best 'scripted' dialogue doesn't sound scripted either) and, if it was, such a throw away remark probably wouldn't have made past the first read through.
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Re: To all who work with choirs - to high pass or not to high pass?

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Wed Feb 24, 2021 11:59 pm

george_vel wrote:Particularly, 2737 Hz was extremely harsh and painful on all tracks, so I’ve cut it everywhere with 2 db. I guess this was some critical frequency of the church where recording was made.

Not likely. Could be related to the mic(s) being used or, more worryingly, it could be related to your headphones/monitors/room.

Whenever you have a consistent problem like this it's important to cross check with an alternative monitoring system and, if possible, look for consistent peaks on a high-res FFT spectrum display or sonograph (to see if it's on the source).
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