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Selling music on iTunes

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Selling music on iTunes

Postby Elephone » Tue Jul 31, 2018 5:22 pm

Hello. Has anyone tried selling their music on iTunes via TuneCore or any of the other distributors? Just wondering the cheapest way to make my music available for paid downloads. Thanks
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Re: Selling music on iTunes

Postby blinddrew » Tue Jul 31, 2018 8:56 pm

I'm currently signed up with Spinnup, but only because it was free. They seem to be fairly prompt on getting stuff up and running but work on an annual fee basis, CD Baby work on a one-time fee basis on each release - $10 for a single £49 for an album. Seems like the better bet to me.
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Re: Selling music on iTunes

Postby James Perrett » Tue Jul 31, 2018 9:02 pm

We put a couple of releases up via CD Baby a few years ago. There was something like a £20 setup charge and they take a cut of each sale but it seemed easy enough. I've always been a bit wary of Tunecore as they have funny ideas about ISRC's which are the standard way of identifying songs. There are also plenty of other contenders these days but I've not really taken a good look at what they offer as most of my customers already have their own digital distribution sorted out.
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Re: Selling music on iTunes

Postby job » Tue Jul 31, 2018 9:44 pm

Distrokid was the most agreeable to me when i was looking into it, although i think Bandcamp is the best for non-well known artists since you're not going to be such a small drop in such a large ocean, it's free, it puts you in control of everything, is cheaper than e.g. iTunes (15% opposed to 30%), allows the user to download their preferred format, you also have your own kind of page which gives you a place to promote when trying to build up your fans. It being my favourite place to buy from would also make it my favourite place to sell from.

Marketing still down to the artist though, just like with the aggregators.
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Re: Selling music on iTunes

Postby BJG145 » Tue Jul 31, 2018 10:53 pm

CD Baby here. Pretty painless.
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Re: Selling music on iTunes

Postby Forum Admin » Wed Aug 01, 2018 12:16 pm

Paul White and a few other muso friends sell their music and merchandise on Bandcamp.com

More info: https://bandcamp.com/artists
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Re: Selling music on iTunes

Postby CS70 » Wed Aug 01, 2018 1:14 pm

An important question is whether or not to pay an annual fee to keep your catalog up, or a one-time fee+a cut on sales.

I reasoned that if you sell a lot, the former is better; if you're unknown and your sales are still small, it's best with an one-time fee.

Once you've decided, you've many similar services that work either way.
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Re: Selling music on iTunes

Postby Martin Walker » Wed Aug 01, 2018 2:48 pm

job wrote:... i think Bandcamp is the best for non-well known artists since you're not going to be such a small drop in such a large ocean, it's free, it puts you in control of everything, is cheaper than e.g. iTunes (15% opposed to 30%), allows the user to download their preferred format, you also have your own kind of page which gives you a place to promote when trying to build up your fans.

+1

I love Bandcamp and have thus far bought over 300 albums from them in FLAC or CD format ;)


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Re: Selling music on iTunes

Postby BigRedX » Wed Aug 01, 2018 5:00 pm

Which aggregator you go for will very much depend on your projected sales. For most new artists one of a the set fee followed by a percentage of the sales is generally the best bet. Look at all the different services and go for the one that potentially offers you the best VFM.

Bandcamp is totally separate from iTunes and and the other digital download and streaming services but is most likely worth doing alongside an aggregator service.

However a couple of things I have discovered from my last musical project is that your sales from downloads and streaming will be negligible unless you do a lot of promotion. IME the cheapest method of promotion is to get out there and gig. At the very worst you should be breaking even on the gigging and making money from selling music and other merchandise. Also be aware that once you stop promoting your music your sales will rapidly drop off to nothing.

Finally, for most new/independent artists to amount of sales/income from digital downloads and streaming is minuscule compared with what you could be making from selling physical product - CDs, Vinyl, Cassettes etc. My last band were selling about 15 actual CDs for every download.
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Re: Selling music on iTunes

Postby blinddrew » Fri Aug 03, 2018 1:46 pm

This ^^^ :)
Bandcamp is a great tool for selling content and linking with other creators but it doesn't give you a fraction of the reach of spotify, itunes or amazon music. Use both and target people accordingly.
Ultimately it's about knowing your audience - if they're mostly gen X and boomers (and you perform your music live) then physical CDs are almost certainly a good bet. If your audience is millenials (and younger) then there's a good chance they don't even own a CD player.
Either way, to do this properly you'll need to manage multiple channels and make sure you're matching them to the message of your advertising.
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