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poor sound quality with windows movie maker

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poor sound quality with windows movie maker

Postby Guest » Sat Jul 20, 2019 1:24 am

I have been recording video using the pre installed camera program on windows 10 and used an external USB sound card. But I tried recording a video again on another computer, but this time with the inbuilt program WMM (windows movie maker) that comes with windows XP and same again using the external sound card.

I am no sound engineer or anything but the sound quality with WMM was not as good as with the camera program in win 10. Any ideas what this could be please?
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Re: poor sound quality with windows movie maker

Postby Martin Walker » Sat Jul 20, 2019 8:57 am

Hi night ans day, and welcome to the SOS Forums! 8-)

I've just approved your first post, so hopefully you'll now get lots of helpful replies :thumbup:

I have personally worked a little with Windows Movie Maker, but always recording the audio separately via a dedicated audio application. If you record your hands clapping or other percussive sound before the start of the recording and make sure the camera can see you do it (film professionals use 'clapper boards' ;) ) you can then import your dedicated high quality audio track into Movie Maker and just slide its timing so that the visual of you clapping coincides with the clap on your audio.

This works well, and has always given me very acceptable quality audio tracks to any video I've worked on, rather than relying on Movie Maker itself for both visuals and audio.

Hope this helps!


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Re: poor sound quality with windows movie maker

Postby Wonks » Sat Jul 20, 2019 12:29 pm

I have a feeling that XP tended to do on-the-fly audio bit depth and frequency rate conversion if the sound card settings weren't the default ones of the sound/video application. If this is happening, it will probably explain the lower sound quality (as it didn't do it very well). Afraid I can't offer any more than that, or a solution, as it's many years since I last used XP. But it might be the cause.
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Re: poor sound quality with windows movie maker

Postby Guest » Sat Jul 20, 2019 5:41 pm

Martin Walker wrote:Hi night ans day, and welcome to the SOS Forums! 8-)

I've just approved your first post, so hopefully you'll now get lots of helpful replies :thumbup:
Thanks!

Martin Walker wrote:I have personally worked a little with Windows Movie Maker, but always recording the audio separately via a dedicated audio application.
Martin
What do you use to record the audio?

Martin Walker wrote:
If you record your hands clapping or other percussive sound before the start of the recording and make sure the camera can see you do it (film professionals use 'clapper boards' ;) ) you can then import your dedicated high quality audio track into Movie Maker and just slide its timing so that the visual of you clapping coincides with the clap on your audio.
Im not quite so sure about this as how would I know when to clap?
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Re: poor sound quality with windows movie maker

Postby Guest » Sat Jul 20, 2019 5:44 pm

Wonks wrote: if the sound card settings weren't the default ones of the sound/video application. .
Windows movie maker give you a dialog box of "audio device" and I have selected my external USB sound card
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Re: poor sound quality with windows movie maker

Postby Wonks » Sun Jul 21, 2019 10:23 am

night ans day wrote:
Wonks wrote: if the sound card settings weren't the default ones of the sound/video application. .
Windows movie maker give you a dialog box of "audio device" and I have selected my external USB sound card
But say the soundcard is set up for 24 bit 48kHz recording and say XP only works on 16-bit 44.1kHz data (just guessing here). Any difference in bit depth or data rate and XP will do the on-the-fly conversion.
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Re: poor sound quality with windows movie maker

Postby Guest » Sun Jul 21, 2019 3:33 pm

Wonks wrote:But say the soundcard is set up for 24 bit 48kHz recording and say XP only works on 16-bit 44.1kHz data (just guessing here). Any difference in bit depth or data rate and XP will do the on-the-fly conversion.
Dont think xp did a 16 bit version, but mine is a 32 bit, wonder if I would get better sound quality on a 64 bit machine then?
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Re: poor sound quality with windows movie maker

Postby Martin Walker » Sun Jul 21, 2019 3:40 pm

No, you're a bit confused here - 16-bit 44.1kHz audio is CD quality (i.e. professional enough for commercial release), while during the recording/mixing process many of us use 24-bit audio at whatever sample rate, and internal the software 32-bit maths may be used to improve sound quality. 64-bit won't be available as an audio interface option, or a software option - bit depths as high as this simply aren't needed as basic options, since 24-bit is already capable of more dynamic range than anyone needs.

What Wonks means is that if there is ANY difference between the bit-depth and sample rate you choose for your audio interface, and what Windows XP (in your particular case) is using inside Movie Maker, then Windows will have to convert between the two different audio formats in real time - it's THIS that may cause a drop in sound quality.

Once Movie maker and your audio interface are both using the same sample rate and bit depth settings, no Windows conversions are needed, so your audio doesn't get degraded.


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Re: poor sound quality with windows movie maker

Postby Guest » Sun Jul 21, 2019 4:38 pm

Martin Walker wrote:No, you're a bit confused here
afraid this is now all beyond me now so best sticking with the inbuilt camera program that comes with windows 10, probably not the best sound quality in the world but its all I know.

The advantage of windows movie maker in xp is it would let you trim a video frame by frame where other more modern programs do not
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