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Gretsch 5260 electric baritone

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Gretsch 5260 electric baritone

Postby BJG145 » Wed Apr 15, 2020 2:46 pm

I was just flipping through a review of this Gretsch....

https://www.gretschguitars.com/gear/bui ... 2516002569

I haven't considered a Baritone before, but it looked intriguing. I was wondering if any folks here had a baritone, and what they found it useful for...?
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Re: Gretsch 5260 electric baritone

Postby Wonks » Wed Apr 15, 2020 3:30 pm

I don't, but I've played a few.

Two main purposes I can think of. 1) to make it easier to play in certain keys (e.g. for piano based songs in Eb) and 2) to do low register riffing to go along with your 5-string bass player in your metal band.

It's also a slightly different guitar voice in a mix.
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Re: Gretsch 5260 electric baritone

Postby Kwackman » Wed Apr 15, 2020 4:39 pm

BJG145 wrote:I haven't considered a Baritone before, but it looked intriguing. I was wondering if any folks here had a baritone, and what they found it useful for...?

I bought an acoustic baritone a few months ago.
Useful for...?
For me it means fewer tunes in the key "E" for a change!
For doubling up on "ordinary" guitar tracks.
It's a new toy!

A friend bought an electric one, which I really liked, but the scale length on it took a little while to get used to.
https://rguitars.co.uk/products/danelec ... dded-value

The acoustic one, a Cort, although having a longer than normal scale length, isn't as extreme.
https://rguitars.co.uk/products/cort-nd ... ural-satin
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Re: Gretsch 5260 electric baritone

Postby John Egan » Wed Apr 15, 2020 5:30 pm

I got a PRS SE 277 a few months ago. As Wonks said, it's a different voice in the mix. It's tuned B to B and gives a few more options, in that it can be fun to use the basic beginner chords in different keys (ie a fourth interval down). The scale length is 27.7" and the strings are 14s, so the feel is different but not difficult to get used to - it's a bit like it used to be when I was a young kid learning to play and guitars came fitted with 13s as standard.
I've had fun with it, and I'm pleased I got it.
Regards, John
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Re: Gretsch 5260 electric baritone

Postby ManFromGlass » Mon Apr 20, 2020 12:57 pm

I have a regular electric I keep tuned down a fifth. It’s hard to keep the lowest strings in tune but I only use it in the studio. Part of the novelty was that bending a string went on for miles! It’s sometimes fun to throw something that extreme into a tune. Sometimes I would use the lower strings to play the bass line.
Could I assume a baritone wouldn’t string bend as far because the instrument is properly set up to be a baritone? Tuning would be more stable too?
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Re: Gretsch 5260 electric baritone

Postby John Egan » Mon Apr 20, 2020 1:09 pm

ManFromGlass wrote:I have a regular electric I keep tuned down a fifth. It’s hard to keep the lowest strings in tune but I only use it in the studio. Part of the novelty was that bending a string went on for miles! It’s sometimes fun to throw something that extreme into a tune. Sometimes I would use the lower strings to play the bass line.
Could I assume a baritone wouldn’t string bend as far because the instrument is properly set up to be a baritone? Tuning would be more stable too?

I think that is true. I don't have experience of downtuning but I can vouch for the fact that whole tone string bends on the baritone are more challenging than on a regular six-string. Tuning stability is not a problem.
Regards, John
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Re: Gretsch 5260 electric baritone

Postby Wonks » Mon Apr 20, 2020 1:18 pm

The longer the scale length, the higher the string tension for a given string gauge to get it up to pitch.

So to stop the strings being ridiculously highly tensioned, you tune down and use thicker strings to get a similar overall string tension to a standard scale length guitar.
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Re: Gretsch 5260 electric baritone

Postby Sam Spoons » Mon Apr 20, 2020 1:33 pm

Daddario have a string tension chart (link below). They don't list baritone guitar scale lengths but it's not hard to work out the individual string tensions from the formula :-

Understanding what determines string tension.

In order to determine the tension at which a string will vibrate, you need three pieces of information: the Unit Weight, the Scale Length, and the Frequency of the string. You can use the charts in this brochure to get a pre-calculated tension for the D’Addario strings listed or you can use the formulas below to calculate the exact tension for any string using the scale length of your particular instrument. All of the charts illustrate string tensions for each string at a variety of pitches, in case you use alternative tunings.

UW- Unit Weight. In all the charts and formulas in the brochure, unit weight is expressed in pounds per linear inch (lb/in).
L- Scale Length. This is the vibrating length of the string. This is determined by measuring the distance from the nut to the bridge of the instrument in inches (in).
F- Frequency or pitch. This is the pitch at which you will be tuning the string expressed in cycles per second (Hertz).

On the following page are two fingerboard graphics detailing the various frequencies for the standard guitar and electric bass guitar.
To calculate the tension of a string in pounds use the formula below, inserting the three variables described above:

T(Tension)= (UW x(2xLxF)2)/386.4

To convert the result into Newtons, simply multiply by 4.45.

If you know what tension you want the string to have, you can calculate the string unit weight. You can then use the charts in this guide to locate a string with approximately the same desired unit weight.

UW(unitweight)= (Tx386.4)/(2xLxF)2


https://www.daddario.com/globalassets/pdfs/accessories/tension_chart_13934.pdf
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Re: Gretsch 5260 electric baritone

Postby ManFromGlass » Mon Apr 20, 2020 5:12 pm

Gaaaaa! Math alert! :headbang:

I’ll stick with Mr Wonks.
:D
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Re: Gretsch 5260 electric baritone

Postby Music Wolf » Mon Apr 20, 2020 5:30 pm

ManFromGlass wrote:Gaaaaa! Math alert! :headbang:
:D

Either get an 's' on the end of Maths or kindly withdraw from the Commonwealth.
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Re: Gretsch 5260 electric baritone

Postby ManFromGlass » Tue Apr 21, 2020 2:28 am

and lose my HobNob privileges - ?? Gadzooks not that!

maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths maths mathsMATHS!
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Re: Gretsch 5260 electric baritone

Postby zenguitar » Tue Apr 21, 2020 3:12 am

And just to put you between a rock and a hard place...

Over the years , I have heard several radio 4 programmes discussing this and making the point that 'doing the math' is as grammatically correct as 'doing the maths'. The French language has an official custodian that can, and does, rule on matter's like this. The English language doesn't have any such official body, what it does have is a number of bodies that monitor how the English language is used and add those usages to the dictionary.

Why does this put you between a rock and a hard place? Because I have Mod powers here and can, therefore, assert that your HobNob privileges are not at risk. In principle, I could ban you for capitulating to peer pressure instead of defending your position.

Obviously, you aren't going to be banned, but I trust you now feel empowered against the grammar police ;)

Andy :beamup:
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Re: Gretsch 5260 electric baritone

Postby Wonks » Tue Apr 21, 2020 9:17 am

Ignore Zen, he's from Devon. He doesn't even know the correct way to put jam and cream on a scone. ;)
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Re: Gretsch 5260 electric baritone

Postby zenguitar » Tue Apr 21, 2020 11:28 am

Ah! I have a system for scones

It depends on whether or not you butter your scone first. Just as the butter (or butter substitute) on a sandwich forms a barrier to stop wet fillings soaking into the bread, it can perform the same role on a scone.

If you use butter it's jam first with cream on top. But if you don't use butter cream is used instead and the jam goes on top. No blind traditionalism here, it's all new fangled evidence based science.

Butter and clotted cream are both ways to preserve fresh cream. I remember my great grandmother spreading butter or clotted cream on fruit cake, and she told me how to make clotted cream.

Andy :beamup:
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Re: Gretsch 5260 electric baritone

Postby ManFromGlass » Tue Apr 21, 2020 12:29 pm

All this grammar and capitulation talk is making me hungry. Excuse me for a few minutes . . . . . .
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