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Connecting pedals to iRig2

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Connecting pedals to iRig2

Postby garrettendi » Thu May 21, 2020 10:45 am

Had a chance to play with GE Labs* the new iOS guitar FX app and I like it, but I'd like to use it as a plain amp and use my pedalboard into it.

Said pedalboard has distortion pedals, and I have had problems with howl before, but nothing bad with my UMC204HD interface. And even then it only occurs when I stack multiple high gain pedals in series, which I very very rarely will do.

What should I watch out for when I'm driving say my Behringer HM300 into a high gain amp in GE Labs?

* Basically like Bias FX or Amplitube, but free!
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Re: Connecting pedals to iRig2

Postby al_diablo » Sun May 24, 2020 8:27 am

Not specific to your setup because I havent used the GE Labs software but I find amp modelling to have a smaller sweet spot regarding input level than real amps, particularly if you're stacking drives. You might find it sounds better to do all your gain on the board and then run it into a clean amp model. If you do decide to use a high gain amp model, aim for a lower gain than you might plan to use from the amp
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Re: Connecting pedals to iRig2

Postby Wonks » Sun May 24, 2020 8:59 am

It's an A/D interface, so you'll need to be careful of input levels to the interface as it's not really designed to have pedals before it. It really expects you to be using all software FX.

You won't damage it with a loud input signal, but you could easily get nasty digital clipping if you don't adjust the input gain to suit, or else keep the pedal output no louder than the bypassed level.
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