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Innovative sounds & recording methods

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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby Martin Walker » Tue Mar 23, 2010 5:24 pm

Now THAT does look more interesting:

Image

If it was free then I don't see any problem in it being shared.


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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby Martin Walker » Tue Mar 23, 2010 5:31 pm

Here's the extremely creative CamelSpace:

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More info here: www.camelaudio.com/camelspace.php

As used by Danny Elfman, Thomas Dolby...


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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby discomb » Tue Mar 23, 2010 9:38 pm

Here's the biggest screenshot I could find of scuzzphut6 v1:

Image

As far as I can tell it has the same functionality as the slicker looking v2.0 above.

"Here is the link for your file, which will be available for 7 Days or 100 downloads."
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby Martin Walker » Wed Mar 24, 2010 5:40 pm

Thanks - got it! :D


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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby Shreddie » Wed Mar 31, 2010 4:30 pm

Martin Walker wrote:In my opinion the sign of a good sound designer is one who's ears are always open to new possibilities, however bizarre they initially seem.
Very true... But once you've been doing it for a while even the bizarre seems quite normal!

geefunk wrote:I spent a bit of time in NY, and wandered around with a mic - got a lot of snatched conversations, traffic noise, etc. All sorts of things can be used to good effect with the right editing.
I did the same when I was in London a few weeks back with my H4. Grabbing sounds of the traffic, the ambience of the Natural history museum etc... I did get some funny looks on the tube though, it seems that Londoners get a little twitchy when they see a bearded man carrying a rucksack and holding a handheld device with a glowing red button!

I did get some cracking sounds though, a bloke sneezed on the tube and thanks to the resonance of the near empty carriage it makes a great snare, a looped short snippet of a girl having a conversation had made a nice pad sound, then there's the sound of the train itself... There's some quite nice rhythms/loops, mechanical noises, the sound of the motors themselves etc.

More recently I've recorded a mate laying a laminate floor, bumps and bangs make for some cool drums, I'm working on something where he's sawing and there's a few vocal snippets that seem promising too.

I've recently got one of those Rycote windjammers for my H4... It's brill! Not as effective as some of the big pro jobbies but it's far more portable and still very good... Much better than the included foam windshield that comes with the H4 (thought you slip the windjammer over the top of that) and as a bonus it fits fairly snugly onto my Rode NT3 too.

Image

If you're into your field recording but get brassed off with wind noise I strongly recommend one for whichever recorder you have... Reasonably effective as a pop shield too.
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby The Bunk » Wed Apr 14, 2010 8:05 am

...back to the culinary slant on things, I'm thinking of attempting recording a pot of something like rice being cooked in boiling water; a nice, soft bubbling-away type sound. Somebody elsehwere here has suggested recording something being deep-fried, which I guess is quite similar. I'm hoping for an effect along the lines of the background noise of a vintage crackly LP.
Any tips apart from the blindingly obvious ones such as not knackering up a decent mic by enveloping it steam... :headbang:??!!?
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby geefunk » Wed Apr 14, 2010 9:31 am

The Bunk wrote:...back to the culinary slant on things, I'm thinking of attempting recording a pot of something like rice being cooked in boiling water; a nice, soft bubbling-away type sound. Somebody elsehwere here has suggested recording something being deep-fried, which I guess is quite similar. I'm hoping for an effect along the lines of the background noise of a vintage crackly LP.
Any tips apart from the blindingly obvious ones such as not knackering up a decent mic by enveloping it steam... :headbang:??!!?

Wash rice. Cover with about an inch of water, then bring to the boil as rapidly as possible. Once boiling, turn the heat down as low as possible, and cook for 20 minutes, WITHOUT taking the lid off ever - the steam helps to fluff up the rice. Perfect.... ;)
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby The Bunk » Wed Apr 14, 2010 10:05 am

...actually, that's a lot more bloody useful than you may think... :D
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby Martin Walker » Wed Apr 14, 2010 4:27 pm

Good advice there - separate fluffy grains can indeed sound more analogue :beamup:

More seriously, I’d be inclined to use a shotgun mic placed slightly further away, or a large mesh screen between the mic and the pot, to avoid any expensive splashback ;)


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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby Zukan » Wed Apr 14, 2010 4:49 pm

geefunk wrote:
Wash rice. Cover with about an inch of water, then bring to the boil as rapidly as possible. Once boiling, turn the heat down as low as possible, and cook for 20 minutes, WITHOUT taking the lid off ever - the steam helps to fluff up the rice. Perfect.... ;)

Chop an onion, a whole head of garlic, fry till golden then add salt, one puree, one chopped tomatoes and one chili sliced sideways. Add cubed fillet of lamb and simmer for 1 hour.

Slice one potato into thin slices and lay at the bottom of a pot that has been glazed with butter and let it cook a little. Turn over potatoes and cook until golden.

Lay a single layer of stew on top of potatoes and one layer of rice. Repeat until stew and rice are finished.
Add saffron boiled and cooled overnight.

Simmer for one hour.

Serious ethnic meal from back home.

Oh, and sample every stage with one sdc and one overhead ldc (you see how cleverly I brought this back on topic, huh, huh?).
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby The Bunk » Thu Apr 15, 2010 8:49 am

Hmmm, interesting ideas. I was also considering the more conventional set-up of an AKGD112 on the oven, the good old SM57 on the small rear burner, maybe a 58 on the large gas ring at the front and a couple of NT5s for overheads...
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby geefunk » Fri Apr 16, 2010 11:40 pm

The Bunk wrote:Hmmm, interesting ideas. I was also considering the more conventional set-up of an AKGD112 on the oven, the good old SM57 on the small rear burner, maybe a 58 on the large gas ring at the front and a couple of NT5s for overheads...

...yeah, but they won't taste as good as Zukes stew
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby gryfyx » Sat Jul 03, 2010 2:39 am

Hi, Its been a long time since I visited this haven. I was too busy trying to decipher 'how to run Metasynth-> Metasynth on Bill Gates' ass', and apparently, I failed to figure that out. Its sad that a state-of-the-art synth like that is strongly supporting racism even till its fifth reincarnation. I have no strong feelings against Steve Jobs' greed. I simply believe in the democratization of the whole idea of art of music and its technology. Well I would have spent some more bucks for a Mac Pro, but instead I ended up spending all of my stash in for buying yet another PC. Sometimes I do follow my heart. And this time I made sure not to.

In the meantime I fell in love with some other pieces of beauty like
NI Massive Image,
Lexicon LXP pro reverb Image ,
Camel Audio Alchemy Image,
ueberschall Ambient Image.
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby gryfyx » Sat Jul 03, 2010 2:50 am

Guys check this video:- Alchemy

Note: Check the point where the description for time stretching pops in. I loved this almost analog like stretch. It immediately reminded me of 'Green and blue patterns are falling all over me like a deck of card' from -- 'Long long arms' by Simon Posford.
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby gryfyx » Sat Jul 03, 2010 3:01 am

Granular Synthesis is what that has made that algorithm possible in Camel Audio - Alchemy. Granularization has been giving me an incessant itch since long. If any one has better info on this then please share.
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby gryfyx » Sat Jul 03, 2010 3:23 pm

Zukan wrote: Chop an onion, a whole head of garlic, fry till golden then add salt, one puree, one chopped tomatoes and one chili sliced sideways. Add cubed fillet of lamb and simmer for 1 hour.

Slice one potato into thin slices and lay at the bottom of a pot that has been glazed with butter and let it cook a little. Turn over potatoes and cook until golden.

Lay a single layer of stew on top of potatoes and one layer of rice. Repeat until stew and rice are finished.
Add saffron boiled and cooled overnight.

Simmer for one hour.

Serious ethnic meal from back home.

Oh, and sample every stage with one sdc and one overhead ldc (you see how cleverly I brought this back on topic, huh, huh?).




I am doing somewhat similar to rice noodles in tomyum sauce with auricula mushroom and Roland R-09. This might not give me a sizzling sample of frying onion, but it still taste damn nice.
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby Martin Walker » Mon Jul 05, 2010 4:13 pm

AuralSerenity wrote:Guys check this video:- Alchemy

Note: Check the point where the description for time stretching pops in. I loved this almost analog like stretch. It immediately reminded me of 'Green and blue patterns are falling all over me like a deck of card' from -- 'Long long arms' by Simon Posford.

Camel Audio’s Alchemy is indeed a potent synth with vast possibilities 8-)

I’ve been working with it for over a year now, and am still discovering lots of new possibilities!


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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby gryfyx » Mon Jul 05, 2010 5:25 pm

Martin Walker wrote:
I’ve been working with it(Alchemy) for over a year now, and am still discovering lots of new possibilities!
Martin

Hi Martin, you are godsend. You can for sure assist me with few ideas on its workflow, maybe few tips or tricks. These days I am a compulsive ab-user of Massive, and would love to cook something out of Alchemy juxtaposed to Massive.
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby gryfyx » Mon Jul 05, 2010 6:29 pm

ZoeB wrote:For a nice synthetic old analogue drum machine style open hi-hat, try spraying an aerosol can. (I spent far too many years tracking before using a proper sequencer, so spent a lot of my teenage years finding weird household sounds to mangle.)

Sad that I noticed this so late.
Anyways, thanx ZoeB, that was interesting (aerosol can).
Other such tricks from your far too many years of hard recording can be golden for this thread.
Please contribute more.
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby tea for two » Thu Jul 08, 2010 1:27 pm

A gent on another forum used Berna http://www.gleetchplug.com/gleetchplug/berna.html for an album recreating a

"simulation of a late 1950s electroacoustic music studio. Oscillators, filters, modulators, tape recorders, mixers ...
Serial, concrete and tape music ... with instruments inspired by the greatest studios of the early days of electronic music."




Also
http://www.behance.net/DiegoStocco




I think anything that makes a sound is useable. I use the recorder built into my £26 Ricoh R3 camera though it does need a wind jammer !

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