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Innovative sounds & recording methods

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Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby gryfyx » Tue Jan 19, 2010 9:16 am

Few innovative sounds that I've recorded

1. I bought an (ab)used and damaged midi synth. It gives me some very weird noises to record and edit. Its very unpredictable.

2. It had only been few minutes since a massive rain, ambiance was still wet, I carried a hand held sound recorder(Roland) and sat on a wet highway sidewalk, late at night, and I got some beautiful effects of cars whooshing by.

3. Hit the basketball on the solid tiled ground - record it - do the required filter tweaking and get a unique analog kick(Can try other balls and other flooring for better aural response).

4. I once stood on a rail bridge and recorded the passing train(I was dangerously close to the train, hence I'll not recommend this). Anyhow, I ended up not using it anywhere. It wasnt that good.

5. Place a table fan(run it on slow speed)between source of sound(Voice is recommended) and mic(Large diaphragm mic), get a very interesting stutter.

6. Try speaking anything and record it(Can, actually, take any voice. But it must be spoken one, not a sung one.) - take another track of synth melody - place sidechain compressor over synth melody - define vocal recording as the source for the sidechaining - put some subtle(Very subtle) automation on synth filter cutoff - keep resonance low(Not very low) - set the gain accordingly - and finally let the voice modulate synth sound - synth will start trying to say something. Loud and clear vocals will help.

7. Deep Fry something on the pan - and record the noise - get a nice warm sound effect of rain - pass the recording through some effects like reverb(But very subtle. I repeat, very subtle).

Note:- Let the reverb always be a mushy Utopian gadget for 'Enya' like aliens. Less of it is better, but remember less doesnt mean inaudible.

8. Light a match - record it upclose - trim the middle portion of the sample - shape it into a sustain loop - put no effect at all - no compressor even - although, can use filter to take care of few anomalies like background hiss or any click or glitch - turn the level absolutely down - try mixing this sustain loop into any track or song by bringing up the level - raise the level very carefully so that loop is barely audible - and soon fade back in - and continue fiddling level whenever feel required.

9. I once recorded my fart. Never used it though.

10. And snores.

~How about you? ;)
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby Pete Kaine » Tue Jan 19, 2010 10:36 am

AuralSerenity wrote:
9. I once recorded my fart. Never used it though.

Not myself but if you find track 2 on this EP anywhere then that's pretty much that covered.
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby Richie Royale » Tue Jan 19, 2010 11:23 am

I'm sure Martin Walker could go for several pages on this!

I once recorded a printer/photocopier at work which when it had run out of paper, would make a very robotic/mechanical sound and then beep in a kind of flatline way. I've used it raw once at the end of an ambient piece but it could do with some manipulation one day.
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby Pete Kaine » Tue Jan 19, 2010 11:27 am

Richie Royale wrote:
I once recorded a printer/photocopier at work which when it had run out of paper, would make a very robotic/mechanical sound and then beep in a kind of flatline way.

Printer Jam by Mistabishi

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=is-HVxmUELQ

One of the best videos I saw last year with some pretty cool sampling.
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby Richie Royale » Tue Jan 19, 2010 11:29 am

Can't see TB at work, but I only became aware of that track late last year, but I've still not heard it. Think I got my sample about 5 years ago.
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby grab » Tue Jan 19, 2010 11:37 am

I've not yet got round to recording it, but I'm currently using a bit of test kit which, when turned on, emits the most fantastic descending filter sweep, probably from the power supply energising. That in itself isn't too unusual, but the odd thing here is that it has a massive rich reverb sound on the sweep as well. I've no idea quite how an industrial PC in a plain metal box can do this - and at the price of this gear, I can't exactly buy one just for the noise it makes! I'll defo get it recorded for future use before I leave here though.
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby gryfyx » Tue Jan 19, 2010 11:49 am

That was a nice DnB track.

Would be great if any other such innovative skill can be shared. :)
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby The Elf » Tue Jan 19, 2010 12:54 pm

I do a lot of this kind of stuff, from swinging speakers and mics around on strings, to abusing all kinds of innocent electronic toys well past their maker's intentions. Tiny amps, radios, record players and tape recorders can all be pressed into service.

I have a speaker that I swing between mics, but it seems to have given up the ghost until I can rustle up a replacement. I've used all kinds of percussive noises for drums. An old vinyl car seat can give you an incredible kick drum. Broken speakers, suitably stressed, can yeild some amazing sounds.

All kinds of containers and kitchen-ware are also fair game. Did you know that the 'unscrewing' sound on the 'War of the Worlds' album was two pans being ground together!?

Oh, and layer, layer, layer. Mingle the nice and the nasty.
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby Martin Walker » Tue Jan 19, 2010 1:13 pm

Welcome to the SOS Forums AuralSerenity! 8-)

And thanks for making your first post such an interesting one.

One of my favourite captured sounds just recently was from an anglepoise lamp - the springs at the angle made a wonderful V'ger style boing when pitched down a little (as heard in 'Star Trek - The Motion Picture' - you can hear the sound I was after at 0:51 in this YouTube snippet www.youtube.com/watch?v=SwLrEcwtFM4 )

Interestingly the sounds was fairly quiet with the mic near the springs themselves, but got amplified beautifully by the conical lamp surround when I moved the mic there.

Folk interested in this thread may also be interested in my 'Warmer Sounds From Digital Synths' feature from SOS January 2010, which includes lots of techniques to add interest to sterile sounds:

www.soundonsound.com/sos/jan10/articles ... synths.htm


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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby gryfyx » Tue Jan 19, 2010 2:22 pm

Thanx Martinwalker. I think I'll love my presence among such knowers.

Anyhow, after starting this thread I did a little internet research and found this out -

http://www.pinoyexchange.com/forums/showthread.php?t=314644,

Its very interesting but some of them are sincerely mistaken there. For instance
'bananaboy' who said
"Jim Morrison of The Doors recorded the vocals on one of their songs (I forgot which) while a girl was, um, performing fellatio on him."

Now that is wrong. that incident occurred in elevator and Pamela (Jim's chick) happen to see all that. No recording of sound or visual was getting done.

What a preposterous myth!

Well, thanx everyone and please continue leaving some interesting dope.
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby gryfyx » Tue Jan 19, 2010 2:37 pm

Thanx 'The Elf', thanx a lot. pan thing in war of the worlds was amazing.
And about "I have a speaker that I swing between mics, but it seems to have given up the ghost until I can rustle up a replacement." that you mentioned, could you please elaborate that, I think I'm getting a different picture.
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby discomb » Tue Jan 19, 2010 4:40 pm

Many years ago in the small hours I decided it would be a good idea to record dripping taps, and got some interesting sounds. water dripping onto shampoo bottles etc, and managed to get the gurgling sound of water going down a plughole by emptying the sink and mic'ing the bath plughole. unfortunately water came out of the bath plughole and drowned the mic. still, I chopped up the drip samples and put them onto sequencer tracks in Fruityloops and made a trippy ambient song, combined with samples of the TV that was going mental - strange fizzing and popping sounds!

More recently I recorded a full washing machine cycle :) most of it was quite boring but the spin cycle was pretty exciting, oh yeah. I put it through scuzzphutt (free rhythmic gate VST) and it worked great.

My top tip for innovative sounds: have a smoke and pick up a mic. :headbang: :beamup:

I don't smoke any more so haven't done this since I bought my zoom H4...
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby The Elf » Tue Jan 19, 2010 5:34 pm

AuralSerenity wrote:And about "I have a speaker that I swing between mics, but it seems to have given up the ghost until I can rustle up a replacement." that you mentioned, could you please elaborate
Get yourself a space where you can suspend an amped speaker face down on a long string; I usually tie mine to the rafters in my garage. I feed the speaker cable along the string too. Measure the extent of the speaker's swing (I have mine travel around 8 feet) and set up a couple of upward-pointing mics at the extremes of the arc.

Then... either swing the speaker in an arc between the mics, or spin it in a circle between the mics, and feed a signal to the speaker. You'll need to keep the swing going if you want to record for any length of time. I love this effect behind a guitar solo. You can also set the mics up X/Y in the centre and circle the speaker around the mics.

I first started doing this kind of thing because I couldn't afford a Leslie (or a Hammond for that matter!), but now I pull the trick because it's just fun and it keeps people guessing how you're getting this incredible swirly effect! It's a bit of a faff to set up (and not one for the winter months!), but it's worth the effort.
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby Martin Walker » Tue Jan 19, 2010 6:23 pm

I love using moving mic/speaker techniques like that Elf 8-)

For the less adventurous who want to avoid damaging their mics through accidental string snapping, just set up a couple of mics a few feet apart and then move your source around manually while you record - this works great with bells, percussion, and singing bowls in particular.

Instant Doppler shift if you can do it quickly enough :bouncy:


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Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby gryfyx » Wed Jan 20, 2010 7:08 pm

I've recently started doing some circuit bending. Its not a great recording technique if you dont know how to go about it, but can be outright alien technology(I truly mean it) if done with skill. I saw a video on circuit bended instrument, instantly loved it. There are three videos, I mentioned the first one, here it is check it out Circuit Bended Machine: Acid Machine

:)
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby gryfyx » Wed Jan 20, 2010 7:12 pm

Martin Walker wrote:I love using moving mic/speaker techniques like that Elf 8-)

For the less adventurous who want to avoid damaging their mics through accidental string snapping, just set up a couple of mics a few feet apart and then move your source around manually while you record - this works great with bells, percussion, and singing bowls in particular.

Instant Doppler shift if you can do it quickly enough :bouncy:


Martin

Wow, it seems lot many are doing this.

would definitely try.

:shock:
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Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby gryfyx » Wed Jan 20, 2010 8:27 pm

Hey guys whoever is keen to learn circuit bending can check this out: http://www.anti-theory.com/soundart/circuitbend/

Another nice recording technique, although this might turn out to be a bit pricey-- Take a "pressure zone microphone" and attach it to any percussion instrument's body and then see the magic of clarity in the low frequencies. Can make some really, really bouncing and heavily pounding kicks.
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby Martin Walker » Thu Jan 21, 2010 2:42 pm

AuralSerenity wrote:Hey guys whoever is keen to learn circuit bending can check this out: http://www.anti-theory.com/soundart/circuitbend/

That's an interesting one thanks.

Another nice recording technique, although this might turn out to be a bit pricey-- Take a "pressure zone microphone" and attach it to any percussion instrument's body and then see the magic of clarity in the low frequencies. Can make some really, really bouncing and heavily pounding kicks.

It needn't be expensive - I seem to remember Tandy (Radio Shack) having some very reasonably priced Pressure Zone Microphones some years back that people were using to record all sorts of stuff. Here's a thread from our previous (version 2) forum on the subject:

http://sound-on-sound2.infopop.net/2/OpenTopic?a=tpc&s=215094572&f=884099644&m=830106272

...and here's a useful history of the PZM:

www.uneeda-audio.com/pzm/index.htm


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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby gryfyx » Thu Jan 21, 2010 4:33 pm

Martin Walker wrote:
AuralSerenity wrote:Hey guys whoever is keen to learn circuit bending can check this out: http://www.anti-theory.com/soundart/circuitbend/


That's an interesting one thanks.

Another nice recording technique, although this might turn out to be a bit pricey-- Take a "pressure zone microphone" and attach it to any percussion instrument's body and then see the magic of clarity in the low frequencies. Can make some really, really bouncing and heavily pounding kicks.


It needn't be expensive - I seem to remember Tandy (Radio Shack) having some very reasonably priced Pressure Zone Microphones some years back that people were using to record all sorts of stuff. Here's a thread from our previous (version 2) forum on the subject:

http://sound-on-sound2.infopop.net/2/OpenTopic?a=tpc&s=215094572&f=884099644&m=830106272

...and here's a useful history of the PZM:

www.uneeda-audio.com/pzm/index.htm


Martin


Thanx Martin.
I dont know why but out here in India PZM's are not all that cheap.

Off-topic query removed and replied to by PM - MW
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Re: Innovative sounds & recording methods

Postby The Elf » Thu Jan 21, 2010 6:00 pm

Martin Walker wrote:It needn't be expensive - I seem to remember Tandy (Radio Shack) having some very reasonably priced Pressure Zone Microphones some years back

I still have a pair of Tandy PZMs, bought way back in the 80s, modified for balanced connection and phantom power (thank you Paul White). Can't say I use them often, but they were a revelation at the time. We got some amazing drum recordings with them taped to the walls of the live room.
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