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PAT testing - Is it legally required

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Re: PAT testing - Is it legally required

Postby Guest » Mon Apr 01, 2019 9:27 pm

Don't seem to see anyone on this web site advertising The fact that there gear is pat tested and insured
https://www.lastminutemusicians.com/sea ... lists.html

But would you expect this at the base line level for 100-150 quid for crap pub jobs?
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Re: PAT testing - Is it legally required

Postby blinddrew » Mon Apr 01, 2019 9:37 pm

Short answer: yes.
Slightly longer answer: yes, because the risks of not having appropriate 3rd party liability cover (or having it declared void because your kit wasn't tested) is simply far too great.
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Re: PAT testing - Is it legally required

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Mon Apr 01, 2019 10:29 pm

music master wrote:Don't seem to see anyone on this web site advertising The fact that there gear is pat tested and insured

They don't specifically say they can drive themselves to a gig or know how to set their equipment up properly either... But we assume they can and will! ;-)

But would you expect this at the base line level for 100-150 quid for crap pub jobs?

Yes, absolutely! I appreciate it's all additional overhead costs which you'd rather avoid, but it's one of those things -- like PLI -- that just has to be done because the potential risks of not being able to show that you took reasonable steps to ensure your gear was safe is far too serious and drastically damaging to contemplate.

And it's also seen by many as a mark of serious professionalism and commitment.

If you're lugging your gear around to gigs regularly its going to suffer wear and tear, so it's essential that it is safety checked on a regular basis. The PAT scheme isn't mandatory, but it is a very good way of checking everything important is safe and documenting the fact. Think of it as an MOT for your electrical gear. Having evidence of regular PAT testing will also keep venues and insurers happy, and the sensible venues will insist on it anyway before they let you in the door. Moreover, it could save your bacon should something bad happen outside your control!

So I would encourage you to get your gear PAT tested regularly. I do mine every 6 months for the most heavily used portable gear, annually for everything else.

Also, before you plug anything in at your crap pub jobs, use a mains socket tester first to make sure it's safe -- it's amazing how many duff ones are around -- and ALWAYS use an RCCB (earth leakage breaker).
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Re: PAT testing - Is it legally required

Postby DavidJGreaves » Sat Apr 27, 2019 9:14 am

One issue is whether to use an automated PAT testing machine or a manual insulation tester. The automated machines are quite expensive and ultimately not as generally useful as an insulation tester with 500 and 1000 volt ranges. Whenever I am making a repair on mains powered equipment I make a manual insulation test. I make the earth continuity resistance tests with a multimeter that works to a tenth of an ohm.

Another issues is the calibration of PAT equipment. Sending it off to an approved lab is expensive whereas just testing it yourself on a few resistors is free. The tolerance required for safe calibration is not an issue, since a 2 to 1 error is not going to affect whether something is safe on not in any real-world situation.

I do not have to regularly test lots of equipment. So when my automated PAT tester failed I did not bother to replace it and I just use my insulation tester, multimeter and various mains cables and probes.

Don't be tempted to make insulation tests with a standard multimeter however. I have an old piece of twin-and-earth cable that makes a good demo: No resistance between live and earth is detected with a standard DMM but the insulation tester on the 500 volt range shows a clear fault. The same piece of cable, when wired to the mains, trips the RCD.

Remember to take great care when using an insulation tester. Mine beeps all the time the voltage is on to keep the user alert.

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