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Acoustic Panel Design

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Re: Acoustic Panel Design

PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2018 1:35 pm
by James Perrett
Does the storage go right up to the ceiling? If not, you could add a trap across the ceiling/wall corner. Bass traps don't have to be vertical.

Re: Acoustic Panel Design

PostPosted: Mon Sep 03, 2018 11:13 pm
by Thomson_Thomson
No, James Perret, there would be a bit of a gap at the top. Solutions! :thumbup:

I was just thinking earlier about doing a horizontal trap on the desk wall too.

Re: Acoustic Panel Design

PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2018 12:33 am
by zenguitar
And look again at your corner bass traps, you are really over-complicating things with your current designs.

Search this site and the broader web for superchunk bass traps and you will get a good idea what people are talking about.

Andy :beamup:

Re: Acoustic Panel Design

PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2018 1:14 am
by Thomson_Thomson
Holy crap, Andy. You're right!
The corners are the result of having too much time on my hands as we are very quiet in work at the moment. ;)
I would still want them to stick out of the wall with a bit of a lip so I can fit LED strips though, especially at the desk end.
I've seen some designs where all they have done is knock up a few pieces of 15mm beading to the wall then stack the rockwool until the void is filled, followed by a bit of fabric to make it easier on the eye.

Re: Acoustic Panel Design

PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2018 9:29 am
by blinddrew
Thomson_Thomson wrote:I've seen some designs where all they have done is knock up a few pieces of 15mm beading to the wall then stack the rockwool until the void is filled, followed by a bit of fabric to make it easier on the eye.
My concern with this approach, I'm sure someone can enlighten me, would be that eight foot of rockwool weighs a lot, and the stuff at the bottom may end up so compressed that it doesn't actually provide any absorption. Breaking up the vertical dimension with a couple of triangular shelves would mitigate this.
But it may be an unnecessary concern?

Re: Acoustic Panel Design

PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2018 9:49 am
by Luke W
blinddrew wrote:
Thomson_Thomson wrote:I've seen some designs where all they have done is knock up a few pieces of 15mm beading to the wall then stack the rockwool until the void is filled, followed by a bit of fabric to make it easier on the eye.
My concern with this approach, I'm sure someone can enlighten me, would be that eight foot of rockwool weighs a lot, and the stuff at the bottom may end up so compressed that it doesn't actually provide any absorption. Breaking up the vertical dimension with a couple of triangular shelves would mitigate this.
But it may be an unnecessary concern?

I've seen larger corner traps divided into sections like that. The RW3 Rockwool I used to build my panels/traps was dense enough to support itself in the corners for the size that I made, but a narrow space and a window meant I had to step the angle back only a few feet up. If I'd have been going floor to ceiling with a 45 degree design I'd have added a couple of shelves for a bit of extra support.

Re: Acoustic Panel Design

PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2018 11:03 am
by Music Wolf
If you take a standard 1200mm x 600mm slab of RW3 and cut it into 4 triangles and stack the triangles floor to ceiling then, for a room in a modern house with a ceiling height of 2.35m, the total weight of the column will be approx. 25kg. The bottom triangles will deform but I don't expect they will compress to such an extent to significantly alter the acoustic properties - however, the column be unstable as a learnt when I installed mine. It's like a giant game of Rockwool Jenga.

Re: Acoustic Panel Design

PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2018 12:06 pm
by blinddrew
I knew clever people would be along shortly to answer the question...
:)

Re: Acoustic Panel Design

PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2018 12:09 pm
by Humble Bee
Following this closely and with great interest since I will be doing this after Christmas early next year.

About the corner bass traps:

Isn't it better to let the rock wool sit on a distance from the corner walls as to increase its absorbing efficiency?

I saw an SOS article where Hugh and Steve helped a guy building some absorbing panels using a wooden frame with rock wool and some high density mat to increase bass absorption. Would it be good for a corner panel bass trap as well? It had auralex foam on the front and I thought they looked nice like that...

Cheers!

Re: Acoustic Panel Design

PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2018 12:15 pm
by Humble Bee
Here:

https://www.soundonsound.com/techniques ... ocal-booth

And it was Hugh and Paul btw...


Found this on YT as well:

https://youtu.be/fiJ6mI450c4

Re: Acoustic Panel Design

PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2018 1:10 pm
by Music Wolf
Humble Bee wrote:Here:

https://www.soundonsound.com/techniques ... ocal-booth

And it was Hugh and Paul btw...

Wow, that feature was 10 years ago but I can still remember reading it as I've often thought about trying something similar. I'm not sure how effective this type of design would be at low frequencies (in the article the application was a vocal booth). Maybe Hugh can comment?

To be effective you would want to maximise the surface area. For a corner application I could envisage building a rectangular frame approx. 600mm wide x full room height (I think that you can buy the mineral loaded vinyl in sheets of 1200mm X 3000mm so one sheet would do two corners). You could then fill in behind with RW3 in a super chunk configuration (rather than the single 50mm sheet in Paul and Hugh's design).

Re: Acoustic Panel Design

PostPosted: Tue Sep 04, 2018 1:39 pm
by thefruitfarmer
Here is one of my builds:

https://www.soundonsound.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=24&t=36315&hilit=thefruitfarmer#p333578

and one from 2004

https://www.soundonsound.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=24&t=116&hilit=thefruitfarmer

The 2004 thread does contain rather a lot of "discussion" but there is plenty of useful stuff there too.

A trick I have used several times is to play the bass guitar in an untreated room, bend the strings a bit to find the particular notes that ring too loud or too quiet relative to the others.

Add some Rockwool traps and you should find that all the notes on the bass sound even up to a certain volume. If you need to go louder then add more Rockwool.

The answer to any acoustic problems in a mixing room is usually to add more rockwool. There are ways to tweak the effectiveness of the use of your Rockwool but you will need a certain amount - the way it works is an energy converter, the sound waves vibrate the RW fibres and convert the sound energy into heat, thus "trapping" the sound before it bounces around the room again and again.

After a while I could quite easily hear the problem areas in my room. Unless you are a pro or monied I would not spend money on testing equipment you will probably only use once. YMMV.

Best of luck with your project - once it is done a treated room is a real joy to mix music in and, if it is quite dead, it will be great for recording vocals.

Re: Acoustic Panel Design

PostPosted: Sat Sep 08, 2018 2:33 pm
by Sam Spoons
I did much of this last year, my panels are 50mm thick RW3 Rockwool, mostly 4' x 2' and spaced 45mm off the walls and ceiling placed at mirror points and 3' x 2' panels over the kit and 'singers corner'. Bass traps are superchunks floor to ceiling in two corners and a large panel just under 5'x3' in a recess behind the monitors (speaker and VDU). I'd guess it covers less than ⅓ of the wall and ceiling area but has made a huge difference to the sound of the room.

Re: Acoustic Panel Design

PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2018 1:30 am
by Thomson_Thomson
Hi Guys,

Thanks for all the advice with this, it's very much appreciated.
I've gone a bit quiet at the moment as I'm still away from home and need to take a few extra measurements before I continue.
In the meantime, I've been trying to learn to use some new drawing packages because the one I was using is mainly for electrical use (SEE Electrical) and it is a little restrictive drawing anything isometrically.
I downloaded Blender and Inkscape. Both are Opensource and seem great so far.
Once I'm a bit more confident, I'll post up some designs.
Eventually I would like to create a studio build thread but only once the construction phase has begun (after she gets her new bathroom :roll:).

Re: Acoustic Panel Design

PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2018 7:06 am
by Waltern8tor
on line room / standing wave calculator such as below might be of interest for illustrating the problematic frequencies of the room you will be using. Obviously you can't change the room dimensions of an existing room (without a sledge hammer) but it's good to know.

http://www.sengpielaudio.com/calculator-roommodes.htm