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Heating a soundproofed space - what method for (near) zero sound + reasonable economy

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Heating a soundproofed space - what method for (near) zero sound + reasonable economy

Postby adamotyril » Mon Oct 05, 2020 11:34 am

Hi,

I am planning to build a 'room within a room' soundproof studio space in one specific room that i have available in my house.

Currently a very conventional type radiator about 2M long is fitted along one wall.

I'm expecting i'll have to remove this for several reasons
1. It reduces the space available for the inner room structure by occupying space out from the external wall.
2. Even if i didn't remove it, it would be on the wrong side of the inner wall : )
3. If i didn't remove it or disconnect it , it would be intermittently blasting the outside of my inner room with heat from a very short distance, which probably wouldn't do it any good (warping etc), and even be dangerous
4. conventional radiator of this kind will tend make a bit of noise as water flows around it.

I was just curious to know what heating set up most people use?
re-piping the rad to be inside the inner room would be doable, but would create problems with taking piping through the soundproofed layers, and even then it would import some unwanted sound as it functioned

Since the inner space is , as a matter of design, going to be highly insulated, I'm hoping that people find that the temp is fairly stable, and fairly easily heated....

but then again electric heaters can be super expensive long term. (and blow heaters expensive and noisy !)

Thanks if you can share your favoured solution/s

with regards A
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Re: Heating a soundproofed studio - what method for (as close to) zero sound + economy

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Mon Oct 05, 2020 11:43 am

adamotyril wrote:Since the inner space is , as a matter of design, going to be highly insulated, I'm hoping that people find that the temp is fairly stable, and fairly easily heated....

To be even reasonably soundproof, the inner room needs to be completely sealed and airtight. That being the case, the much bigger problem is more usually one of keeping it cool and with breathable air, rather than heating the space.

So as a fundamental and critical element of your room-within-a-room design, you need a means of exchanging the foul air within for fresh air drawn in from outside -- and that fresh air needs to be suitably heated or cooled as necessary. This is clearly quite a bit more complicated and involved than just deciding what to do with a radiator or electric fan heater... and not least because of the challenges of stopping the transmission of sound in or out along with the air!
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Re: Heating a soundproofed space - what method for (near) zero sound + reasonable economy

Postby adamotyril » Mon Oct 05, 2020 11:59 am

yeah, heat, cool and air is the last big technical issue i have to get my head around.

I have so far researched and arrived at reasonable solutions for double glazing of outer windows, of materials and composition of inner space, including doors and windows,

and in terms of what I have actually done, I have thus far fully stuffed the joist space of the ceiling/floor that is the floor ABOVE the studio room with sound grade rockwool, (accessing this from the room above by taking the floor up there out) and then re-mounted the floor up there with neoprene strips between the boards that will be the floor up there and the joists upon which that floor rests, as in , strips of neoprene on top of the joists.
i have also (before putting the floor back and stuffing it, obviously) stabilised the joists above with transectional mini joists to reduce their movement in general,
I have carefully fitted 15mm sound mats with no gaps onto the floor of that room that is above the studio, AND i have layered on top of that an additional layer of weighted vinyl, AND the, finally, put down a thicker softer final flooring in the room above.

In terms of now addressing the space below, I will first carefully seal existing windows, then mount thick perspex double glazing, with a neoprene rubber seal where the perspex adjoins the window frame.

Even on top of the work already done 'down from above' on the upper floor, I will also fix on the ceiling of the 'outer' room below an impact sound reduction system on aluminium rails, This will consist of impact sound reducing clips and rails, designed to 'decouple' any remaining impact sound from above, by way of being part of a false ceiliing below it,
and two layers of acoustic grade plasterboard which themselves will 'sandwich' one additional layer of vinyl or similar will be fixed from below onto those aluminium rails, then sealed around the edges with something, presumably acoustic grade silicon sealant.

Then, finally, a timber framed 'floating' inner room will be made (won't detail all of the materials for that now, but it's more acoustic grade plasterboard, mass loaded vinyl, and rockwool)

I'm planning to put a 'zig zagged' and double plasterboarded and heavily rockwool insulated panel in the wall of the inner room to house both an inward bound and outward bound air route, with sound proof grills as the final bit that i'll see inside the room.

But in terms of what happens to the in and out air pipes after that, I haven't fully decided.
One option is to route them out of the room via *an additional* zig zagged baffle box.

Then they egress out into an area that exists outside of the studio room that has stairs going down to the room, and can be bounded at each end by soundproofed doors....but i would have thought I could create sound insulated housing boxes that can be fixed onto the ceiling of this intermediate area, with electricity supply and unscrewable access panels in which i can put some fans and or heating cooling devices. Air in and out of this area can arrive through holes in the masonry, each with addtional baffle boxes on them if necessary. There's enough room for this.

I expect you have to replace service these actual devices from time to time as things like that get noisier as they get older.

Then i can have a final egress , through yet another baffle box if necessary, through a second wall that is at the top of the stairs that go down towards the sound proofed room. They'd go through the wall at the top of this intermediate/staired area , out into a hall area of the house, from which the air will be drawn. This hallway connects to various big areas of the house, so there'll be plenty of air around : ) it's not an especially well insulated house *in general* (with exception of the area i'm preparing as a studio) so i reckon i can draw air from a hallway area that is within this house.

Why not connect the air intake through an exterior wall to the actual outside of the house?
well, i'd sooner not be directly drawing in moist or wet or very cold air, wetness will surely tend to make things warp and corrode the fans/devices sooner.
ALso, even though its' drawing air from an ordinary house hallway, the hall way will itself be a bit quieter that what the outside world can sometime be (helicopters, police cars, whatever)

but yeah, having plenty of air, of the right temperature, will be crucial to the success of the project.

I'm not sure what the consequences of having multiple zig zag baffle boxes and long air pipe distances may be. If i end up with a system where fans have to be turned off at critical recording moments, so be it .Would be nice not to have to though.
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Re: Heating a soundproofed space - what method for (near) zero sound + reasonable economy

Postby James Perrett » Mon Oct 05, 2020 2:03 pm

A nice big mixing desk and a few racks of outboard will give you enough heat to keep a well insulated room at a reasonable temperature.

My studio is in a separate building and I just use a convector heater with a plug in thermostat to keep the room at a reasonable background temperature when it isn't being used. On a cold day just before a session I'll crank the heater up to bring things up to a working temperature but once the session is underway I rarely need any additional heat.
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Re: Heating a soundproofed space - what method for (near) zero sound + reasonable economy

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Mon Oct 05, 2020 2:37 pm

adamotyril wrote:I'm not sure what the consequences of having multiple zig zag baffle boxes and long air pipe distances may be. If i end up with a system where fans have to be turned off at critical recording moments, so be it .Would be nice not to have to though.

I'm a long way from being an expert in HVAC technology... but I know a man who is and who frequents the forum in his Gnome form occasionally. All I can say is that I've seen (and heard) more than a few home studio builds completely let down by bad air circulation systems. And a few one 'professionally built' ones, too.

Given the extraordinary levels you're going to with your home studio build, I would find an experienced professional studio consultant to advise on the best solution for your specific situation. it would be enormously frustrating to have gone to all that work in trying to remove noises from above and around, and then suck it all back in through a poorly designed air venting system.
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