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The Black Notes

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Re: The Black Notes

Postby The Bunk » Mon Jun 13, 2016 6:37 pm

...just noticed slight typo above with a capital "Q" on "Je ne sais Quoi". Sorry, I'm just used to typing anything with "Quo" in it with a capital Q... :D
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Re: The Black Notes

Postby Guest » Mon Jun 13, 2016 7:12 pm

Intervals/Voice leading are/is the same for any major (or minor key,) you basically leap to the consonants and step through the dissonants, a 5th relationship, is the same in F maj, as it is in G maj, C maj etc. Adding an F#/Gb (black note) to say, Dmaj is merely labelling a 3rd, the 3rd like the 5th (see above) and any other interval will say the same thing within a composition, only a tad higher or lower.

I've often wondered do keys sound different to each other considering the intervas all adhere aesthetically to the same physics.

Each of the compromised standard equal tempered notes are not of the same ratio/distance from each other, therefore if human hearing can detect such minute discrepencies within each compared resounding note collectively within one key then there would obviously be a difference, but is there, or is it only percieved as so, as we're actually unable to detect such small discrepancies within intervals?

Er, or words to that effect.
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Re: The Black Notes

Postby blinddrew » Mon Jun 13, 2016 9:12 pm

LdashD wrote:
Each of the compromised standard equal tempered notes are not of the same ratio/distance from each other, therefore if human hearing can detect such minute discrepencies within each compared resounding note collectively within one key then there would obviously be a difference, but is there, or is it only percieved as so, as we're actually unable to detect such small discrepancies within intervals?

I think that might be the closest I've come to understanding one of your posts ;)
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Re: The Black Notes

Postby Guest » Mon Jun 13, 2016 9:34 pm

blinddrew wrote:
LdashD wrote:
Each of the compromised standard equal tempered notes are not of the same ratio/distance from each other, therefore if human hearing can detect such minute discrepencies within each compared resounding note collectively within one key then there would obviously be a difference, but is there, or is it only percieved as so, as we're actually unable to detect such small discrepancies within intervals?

I think that might be the closest I've come to understanding one of your posts ;)

In me own defence I would proffer, I'm only partially responsible for the complexity of the simplicity of me own Q & A's, & anyway wot's the flippin' answer?
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Re: The Black Notes

Postby blinddrew » Mon Jun 13, 2016 9:39 pm

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Re: The Black Notes

Postby The Bunk » Sat Jun 18, 2016 5:00 pm

Forum Admin wrote:
The Bunk wrote:Just heard a lovely (piano) ambient track based around two chords, F and Bb.

I can while away hours on the piano noodling over Fmaj7 > Cmaj7 chord inversions. Whack the piano's sustain pedal down, don't release it, and I'm in ambient heaven. All the white notes, easy-peasy.

On guitar, open strings ring and sound different, of course, but on piano I'd guess it's got something to do with the harmonic overtones?

I suspect you may have already tried it but "Parisienne Walkways" is perfect for that kind of thing. Sounds lovely on a pianner. I think there's a couple of the little b*ggers (black notes) in there but it's lovely chord progression.
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Re: The Black Notes

Postby ManFromGlass » Wed Jul 06, 2016 7:51 pm

desmond wrote:I blame it on starting the beginning of my musical education with a Casio VL-Tone, on which the black notes were larger, higher, spaced wider apart and much easier targets than the white notes, so I tended to learn riffs and melodies based around them more often...

+1 for VL-tone!
:thumbup:
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Re: The Black Notes

Postby ManFromGlass » Wed Jul 06, 2016 8:19 pm

LdashD wrote:Each of the compromised standard equal tempered notes are not of the same ratio/distance from each other, therefore if human hearing can detect such minute discrepencies within each compared resounding note collectively within one key then there would obviously be a difference, but is there, or is it only percieved as so, as we're actually unable to detect such small discrepancies within intervals?

Strip away the psychological associations we have to specific songs, intervals even instrument timbres and I believe we definitely detect these microtones. I'm too lazy and hot right now to research the science but how can one explain how a large group of people find some keys dark? Or happy etc. some people see colours connected to specific keys. Then to make this even more messed up the note A was not always 440. For fun on YouTube search out - beethoven_s Eroica_opening chords How do some of the chords make you feel when you hear them?
I've played around with Unequal Temperament, sorry I forget what it's really called, and there are some serious minor chords In some of those keys. Fascinating stuff.
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