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Faking rhythm guitar chord voicing on keyboards

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Faking rhythm guitar chord voicing on keyboards

PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2019 12:02 am
by Gone To Lunch
I am using NI Session Guitarist - Strummed Acoustic 2 to fake a rhythm guitar part in a sort of retro-mainstream pop/country song, think 1st Eagles album ish.

I am aware that the root position keyboard triads aren't what happens on the guitar, so I want to find or learn how to deduce the inversions/spacings typical of this sort of music. Without physically learning the guitar.

Just as an experiment I tried 2nd & 3rd inversion, sometimes with no root because it was in the bass, and that sounded better, but I want to be more methodical and figure out how it all works if possible.

Re: Faking rhythm guitar chord voicing on keyboards

PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2019 1:03 am
by Sam Spoons
It's not that simple, the intervals are usually quite different (I'm a guitar player and have recently been trying to translate some jazz guitar chords to midi).

It helps to know that most six string open or barre chords on guitar span two octaves and 5 string chords an octave and a 4th or 5th. A simple, early Eagles, Open G major is R1 3rd 5th R2 3rd (or 5th) R3 but a typical A or E shape chord (open or barre) is 5 1 5 1 3 5 or 1 5 1 3 5 1 There is always a large interval or 'missing' note somewhere if you are playing more that three or four notes. If you can learn which notes have to be missed that will help make it sound more guitar like.

It's not (quite) essential to play it on guitar to make it sound like guitar but it sure helps to know which notes the guitar player would be playing.

Re: Faking rhythm guitar chord voicing on keyboards

PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2019 9:23 am
by Folderol
It's actually quite difficult to get it sounding authentic. As well as the uneven spacing Sam described, you don't actually play chords, but fast arpeggios - in both directions, and the volume of individual strings will be quite variable and different.

Re: Faking rhythm guitar chord voicing on keyboards

PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2019 11:07 am
by The Elf
There are a couple of guitar emulations that take into account relative spacing and generate hammer-ons and other artefacts as you play. One such are the Orange Tree guitar samples that I use for my lead guitar moments. It can sound very good as long as you avoid obvious repetition.

Generally speaking, even without the clever sample sets, I find that if I don't stray too far from bottom D on the left hand the rest of it sounds fairly convincing.

Re: Faking rhythm guitar chord voicing on keyboards

PostPosted: Thu Feb 07, 2019 11:08 pm
by Gone To Lunch
Thank you all for your help.

Upon the question of knowing which notes to leave out in which chords, I have found what I hope is a useful resource here :

https://www.8notes.com/guitar_chord_chart/f.asp

My current song is in Fmaj so, looking at the Fmaj page on the above link, the second version, the notes go

C-F-A-C-F, (5-1-3-5-1), L-R is low to high presumably ?

So I simply copied this in my MIDI track, and it worked fine, nicer to me than the 1st one, as I have a prominent F in the bass already.

So am I right in assuming this chart could serve as a guitar-keyboard rosetta device ?

(He said hopefully)

Re: Faking rhythm guitar chord voicing on keyboards

PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 3:32 am
by Nathan-VST-Plugins
RealStrat guitar plugin from MusiLab has a similar chord voicing technology to help achieving realistic results, see if this text from their website convince you:

"Chord voicing

Guitar chord voicing is very unique depending on guitar construction and is absolutely necessary to reproduce in order to achieve authentically sounding chordal parts. Our patented technology provides accurate reproduction of guitar chord voicing automatically for 30 chord types in all existing inversions, extensions and alterations."

If you are into progressive/metal they also have a 8 string guitar VST which sounds very good. :thumbup:

Re: Faking rhythm guitar chord voicing on keyboards

PostPosted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 5:15 pm
by Gone To Lunch
Nathan-VST-Plugins wrote:RealStrat guitar plugin from MusiLab has a similar chord voicing technology to help achieving realistic results, see if this text from their website convince you:

"Chord voicing

Guitar chord voicing is very unique depending on guitar construction and is absolutely necessary to reproduce in order to achieve authentically sounding chordal parts. Our patented technology provides accurate reproduction of guitar chord voicing automatically for 30 chord types in all existing inversions, extensions and alterations."

If you are into progressive/metal they also have a 8 string guitar VST which sounds very good. :thumbup:

I would love to explore, as they also do an acoustic, which is my current requirement, but I just don't have the money right now.

So I am going to have to stick with coaxing the best I can out of my NI Strummed Acoustics.

https://www.musiclab.com/products/realguitar/info.html

Re: Faking rhythm guitar chord voicing on keyboards

PostPosted: Fri May 03, 2019 10:53 am
by mpsjazz
Folderol wrote:It's actually quite difficult to get it sounding authentic. As well as the uneven spacing Sam described, you don't actually play chords, but fast arpeggios - in both directions, and the volume of individual strings will be quite variable and different.


When I need to emulate rhythm guitar on keyboard I usually skip (at least) the second note up from whatever triad inversion it is, and cluster in an extended harmony near the top. This follows the natural laws of harmony and enharmonics anyway. And I usually roll the chords slightly to get that almost arpeggiated feel. Sometimes I just play two-note chords near middle C, using intervals of 6ths and 7ths (as much as possible) since that's what you can mainly hear eminating from the rhythm guitar in a large ensemble IMO. You can get a really nice voice-leading harmonic line that way. And this pattern can sound good as an alternative way of playing piano too, in say jazz or blues, but only when there is no guitar to clash with. Minimizing the harmonies like this (for a while) gives everybody's ears a rest.

Re: Faking rhythm guitar chord voicing on keyboards

PostPosted: Wed Jun 05, 2019 10:48 am
by N i g e l
I have tried out the Martin Guitar VST from Amplesound in my DAW. It has a usefull free/lite version to try it out.

https://www.amplesound.net/en/index.asp

The interface is comprehensive and lets you play in real time. Just looking at the controls will give a good idea of whats required to emulate guitar strumming, including thumps, squeeks, palm muting...

there are several youtube tutorials eg..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jHnI2igGSqA

jump straight to 7:45 for more music/less chat