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Are octaves harmony?

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Poll ended at Fri Oct 11, 2019 10:31 pm

Yes
3
18%
No
9
53%
Maybe
5
29%
 
Total votes : 17

Re: Are octaves harmony?

Postby themarqueeyears » Thu Oct 03, 2019 9:07 am

Having read all the excellent replies, I'm happy with my original if not admittedly quirky approach.

That is octaves are not a harmony but an interval useful for voice thickening/doubling of another voice.

An octave has no diatonic harmonic function other than to double (thicken) a voice within a 4 note chord.

I guess it comes down to ones personal definition of Harmony or in my perception Harmonic function.

Enjoyable thread :)
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Re: Are octaves harmony?

Postby Eddy Deegan » Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:06 am

themarqueeyears wrote:I guess it comes down to ones personal definition of Harmony or in my perception Harmonic function.

Of course one is free to adopt any definition one wants, right up to the point you undergo some form of examination on the subject at which point you're probably in hot water if your definition differs from formal theory!

Personally I found a lot of the theory rather dry, and I disagreed with some of it myself (what, no parallel intervals? begone!) but there are definitely right and wrong views when it comes to examination boards.

Probably wiser not to adopt a 'custom' definition in formal terms, just use them as notes ;)
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Re: Are octaves harmony?

Postby themarqueeyears » Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:52 am

Eddy Deegan wrote:
themarqueeyears wrote:I guess it comes down to ones personal definition of Harmony or in my perception Harmonic function.

Of course one is free to adopt any definition one wants, right up to the point you undergo some form of examination on the subject at which point you're probably in hot water if your definition differs from formal theory!

Personally I found a lot of the theory rather dry, and I disagreed with some of it myself (what, no parallel intervals? begone!) but there are definitely right and wrong views when it comes to examination boards.

Probably wiser not to adopt a 'custom' definition in formal terms, just use them as notes ;)

Good point!

Fortunately at 56 years old my music college days are far behind me :)
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