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Applying classical forms to new music

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Re: Applying classical forms to new music

PostPosted: Wed Oct 21, 2020 8:06 pm
by MOF
So you mean playing it live to an audience, I get it now. Maybe a live overdub would be a good idea though, otherwise it’s you hitting the play button and the audience just looks at a load of synths doing their thing.

Re: Applying classical forms to new music

PostPosted: Wed Oct 21, 2020 9:07 pm
by Ben Asaro
Yup! The "soloist" is going to be a live synth. Plus, there are a million buttons and dials that need to be pressed to make this work!

Re: Applying classical forms to new music

PostPosted: Wed Oct 21, 2020 9:55 pm
by RichardT
That brings my minimum number of distinct voices to 11. That's a pretty big patch!! :D I would also require a way to sequence a minimum of 7 melody lines at once: 4 string melody lines, 2 woodwind melody lines, 1 brass melody line.

How are you planning to control these 11 voices live?

Re: Applying classical forms to new music

PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2020 3:05 am
by Ben Asaro
RichardT wrote:
That brings my minimum number of distinct voices to 11. That's a pretty big patch!! :D I would also require a way to sequence a minimum of 7 melody lines at once: 4 string melody lines, 2 woodwind melody lines, 1 brass melody line.

How are you planning to control these 11 voices live?
NerdSeq and my hands. :)

Re: Applying classical forms to new music

PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2020 12:18 pm
by blinddrew
Well I have no idea about classical forms or 'owt like that but I've very much enjoyed what you've posted so far. :)

Re: Applying classical forms to new music

PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2020 1:15 pm
by Ben Asaro
blinddrew wrote:Well I have no idea about classical forms or 'owt like that but I've very much enjoyed what you've posted so far. :)
Thanks for posting, ‘drew!

Re: Applying classical forms to new music

PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2020 1:50 pm
by Ben Asaro
I sat down last night and mapped out all of my available voices. Here is what I’ve come up with. I will be retaining the orchestral section names to keep things clear in my head as to what roles they will play:

STRING SECTION
NerdSeq Tracks 1-4 > Studio Electronics Quadnic
NerdSeq Track 5 > 2hp Pluck

WOODWIND SECTION
BeatStep Pro Sequencers 1-2 > Moog Mother-32, Studio Electronics Oscillation

BRASS SECTION
Moog Subharmonicon, Sequencer 1 > Twisted Electrons AY3 #1, Sequencer 2 > Twisted Electrons AY3 #2

PERCUSSION SECTION
NerdSeq Track 6/Trigger Outs > (1-4) Tiptop Audio 808 modules, (5-6) Erica Synths Pico Drums, (7-8) Twisted Electrons AY3 modules noise out

There are a host of control considerations to decide on. For example, I will need to have two envelopes for the bass string section, long for sustained bass notes, and short for staccato lines. I will probably use a sequential switch to cycle through the envelopes when needed.

The BeatStep Pro’s sync will also present challenges. As I can’t guarantee that I’ll physically be able to start and stop the BSP every time it’s required, I will have to use trigger pulses from the NerdSeq to sync the BSP. That frees me up to switch sequences with the BSP without the added overhead of stopping and starting it as well.

The other major consideration is how I’m going to handle filtering and panning. If I combine voices paraphonically (is that even a word?), that will eliminate stereo panning. The WORNG Sound Stage has optional filtering, but that would override the Moog filters for the Mother-32 and Subharmonicon. The Sound Stage’s filter does have a CV input so perhaps that will be the way to address it? I can add filtering when needed in that case.

Re: Applying classical forms to new music

PostPosted: Thu Oct 22, 2020 8:20 pm
by Ben Asaro
It took two commutes to work out all the connections but it was worth it -- I now have a very clear roadmap to proceed. I also realized that I'm short some 5ft patch cables, they are slated to arrive on Monday.

Next up is proof of concept and writing the Ritornello and first and second Subjects!

I already have an idea in mind, so I really need to get some sounds going for proof of concept.

Excited to get past the planning stage!!

Re: Applying classical forms to new music

PostPosted: Fri Oct 23, 2020 12:26 am
by Ben Asaro
Conducted a quick test tonight with the 4 ‘string section’ voices. It worked great! First test audio coming soon!

Re: Applying classical forms to new music

PostPosted: Fri Oct 23, 2020 8:10 am
by Arpangel
I’m looking forward to your "Switched On" version of "Appalachian Spring"

:D

("Switched On" being a phrase used by Wendy Carlos to describe her electronic renditions of Bach's works, and is used as a quote only in the context of this post)

;)

Re: Applying classical forms to new music

PostPosted: Fri Oct 23, 2020 12:35 pm
by Ben Asaro
Arpangel wrote:I’m looking forward to your "Switched On" version of "Appalachian Spring"

:D
LOL
Though I am following a classical form, this is going to sound a lot more like Krautrock than Bach!

Re: Applying classical forms to new music

PostPosted: Fri Oct 23, 2020 1:04 pm
by Arpangel
It is strange though, a lot of classical works do sound better on the synthesiser to me, sometimes it’s because you can really go to town on making the lines stand out from each other, so you can hear the counterpoint really clearly.
I’ve got an old vinyl album of Erik Satie played by a small string ensemble and a Moog Modular, it’s so beautiful, totally beyond.

Re: Applying classical forms to new music

PostPosted: Fri Oct 23, 2020 4:54 pm
by Ben Asaro
3 of the 8 melody lines for the first subject are pretty much done! Looks like this will be in D Major. If anyone more familiar with the rules of counterpoint could have a look, I think I've followed the rules correctly! :D

Image

Re: Applying classical forms to new music

PostPosted: Fri Oct 23, 2020 5:08 pm
by GilesAnt
If you are aiming for strict counterpoint you ,might want to change the parallel octaves in bar 1 between VCO2 and 3 (D to E). But things like this depend on the bigger picture sometimes.

Re: Applying classical forms to new music

PostPosted: Fri Oct 23, 2020 5:19 pm
by Ben Asaro
GilesAnt wrote:If you are aiming for strict counterpoint you ,might want to change the parallel octaves in bar 1 between VCO2 and 3 (D to E). But things like this depend on the bigger picture sometimes.
Thanks for pointing that out, I did notice the parallel octave, and it may change as the other voices come online. I am not trying to create a strict counterpoint but once the voice count starts getting high it's alway nice to know that I'm following most of the standards for harmonization.

Nice catch, though, and I appreciate your looking it over!