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Live mixing console history

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Live mixing console history

Postby Robert Livesey » Wed Jun 25, 2014 12:29 pm

Hi guys, Im am in the midst of doing my dissertation on a live sound degree and i am struggling to find anything on the very first live mixing consoles.

If you guys have any information that you know of that i could then research into that would be great.

Examples of what i am looking for are things such as:

The first real live mixing console -
The people who were mainly involved with the inventions of the live mixing console in both the uk and usa
Which were the 5- 10 major players in terms of live mixing consoles when they first started out
what was the the first digital live mixing console, who was it made by and why did it happen

Any information would be great as being a student it several learning difficulties it can be hard to trace all down all the history.

Thank you very much guys :bouncy:

I look forward to you opinions and responces
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Re: Live mixing console history

Postby The Korff » Wed Jun 25, 2014 1:03 pm

This might be of interest?

Cheers!

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Re: Live mixing console history

Postby Robert Livesey » Wed Jun 25, 2014 1:11 pm

Thank you chris, haha i stumbled upon about 20 minutes ago! Its very interesting that the mixer that was used was originally created for studio! I have also found that there was one made by WEM called the F.R 30 which failed but the was revisited and tweaked. This then became the WEM Audiomaster which played a massive role in the foundations of the mixing consoles.

Thank you for your help.

All information is helpful

Rob Livesey :lol:
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Re: Live mixing console history

Postby damoore » Wed Jun 25, 2014 3:26 pm

That seems to be way late. By 1970, PA was commonplace, though having wedges for monitoring was not.

Here is a link to some of the early PA systems used by the Who
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Re: Live mixing console history

Postby James Perrett » Wed Jun 25, 2014 5:00 pm

Robert Livesey wrote:
what was the the first digital live mixing console, who was it made by and why did it happen

I would guess that it was probably the Yamaha DMP7 as it was the first portable digital mixer that I know of.
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Re: Live mixing console history

Postby SoundFox » Wed Jun 25, 2014 8:09 pm

Sounds like an interesting topic.

There's a neat book called Grateful Dead's Gear Instruments, Sound Systems and Recording Sessions, you might try checking into. Them, and the people around them pioneered, or refined a lot of the live sound toys we take for granted these days. Everything from consoles to DI boxes, and power conditioners. They were constantly on the road, battle testing it, so everything had to be built well, and able to survive any environment, from Vegas, to Alaska.

Even if you're not into their music, the gear innovations they were a part of may surprise you.

Good luck!
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Re: Live mixing console history

Postby MarkPAman » Thu Jun 26, 2014 11:47 am

James Perrett wrote:
I would guess that it was probably the Yamaha DMP7 as it was the first portable digital mixer that I know of.

I remember queuing for over an hour to get a demo at one of the trade shows - 85 or 86 I think.

I remember thinking that although it was terribly clever, the move away from one control = one function, may not be such a good thing. I view which, in many ways, I think I still hold.
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Re: Live mixing console history

Postby Offramper » Thu Jun 26, 2014 1:33 pm

I take it you have read up on Bill Putnam and Les Paul. The Universal Audio 610 was in use in the very early 1960's if that is pushing your timeline back at all. I know these were recording consoles but you may find a useful link through into live performance consoles? ie, find out when these recording consoles broke out of the studio or were used in mixing a live performance in one of the larger studios. I recall seeing The Who in mid 1960s and they were still using two Marshall amps fed into 4 Marshal 4x12 columns for vocals. No sign of a mixing desk (or a mix engineer!) In fact I can't recall seeing a mix desk at any of the gigs I went to at Chelmsford Corn Exchange during the 1960's (although as someone once said "if you remember the 1960's you weren't there!")
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Re: Live mixing console history

Postby planetnine » Fri Jun 27, 2014 12:22 pm

Look up Allen & Heath's early history and the quadraphonic desk they made for Pink Floyd in the early 1970s. Alan Parsons was the FOH.

Article here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allen_%26_Heath



>
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Re: Live mixing console history

Postby Robert Livesey » Sun Jun 29, 2014 1:41 pm

Thank you very much guys im now starting to the foundations of a solid timeline, it is so weird to think that their were no desks at all at one point!

I am struggling to find the desks by my self, so all the information is brill!

Cheers for the help guys! Keep them coming :headbang:
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Re: Live mixing console history

Postby James Perrett » Sun Jun 29, 2014 7:46 pm

Robert Livesey wrote:it is so weird to think that their were no desks at all at one point!

If you've ever been in the same room as a big band playing decent arrangements you would understand why complex live sound systems weren't needed back then. Maybe the odd vocal mic for the crooners but that would be about it.
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Re: Live mixing console history

Postby chris... » Sun Jun 29, 2014 10:47 pm

ditto close up to a symphony orchestra
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Re: Live mixing console history

Postby ronmac » Mon Jun 30, 2014 12:56 am

Here is a history of Yorkville Sound, a Canadian company, that may help with some useful timeline info on musical instrument amplification and early PA systems.

http://www.yorkville.com/downloads/othe ... istory.pdf
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Re: Live mixing console history

Postby Mixedup » Mon Jun 30, 2014 10:44 am

Also look up info on the Rolling Stones. They were cranking up amps in the mid sixties but were blasting things out over PA by at least 1969 (for some huge gigs such as Hyde Park and the ill-faited Altamont one). There must also be info in relation to festivals from around that time (Woodstock, Isle Of Wight etc.)
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Re: Live mixing console history

Postby Forum Admin » Mon Jun 30, 2014 12:09 pm

Robert Livesey wrote:....The people who were mainly involved with the inventions of the live mixing console in both the uk and usa

There's a Performing Musician article about Led Zeppelin's live sound here, which includes an informative panel section interview with Zep's first dedicated FOH engineer on the 1970 USA tour - a certain Phil Dudderidge.

http://www.performing-musician.com/pm/jun08/articles/ledzepp...

Phil went on to co-found UK console makers Soundcraft, launching the famous Series 1 (analogue) console which (I think) was the first to be built in to its own flightcase. He is currently Chairman of Focusrite.

Midas are a name from the early days of live desks too.

The Yamaha DMP7 was the first compact digital mixer but was aimed mostly at recording. It graced the front cover of SOS July 1987 but the review is not on this site.

Hope it helps.
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