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Adding reverb to a mobile speaker

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Adding reverb to a mobile speaker

Postby Guest » Fri Dec 06, 2019 3:57 pm

Hi
I just recently purchased a battery powered "Ravie Pow 10" speaker from Dawsons
But it only has delay on it and I wanted a proper reverb and was wondering if there was a cheap way of doing it
The music shop said they sold effects pedals but where between 100-150 quid and considering the speaker only cost 50 quid its not worth it!
Can you program them by any chance

Thanks in advance
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Re: Adding reverb to a mobile speaker

Postby Wonks » Fri Dec 06, 2019 5:06 pm

No, you can't add reverb directly to that speaker or change the delay to a reverb by programming. The cheapest way to add reverb is probably with a small mixer with FX built in.

Cheapest one I could find: https://www.gear4music.com/PA-DJ-and-Li ... -Mixer/2A7

Very few speaker systems have built-in reverb, as it's normally either an effect wired into a mixer or built-in to a mixer. So the mixer would be useful if you planned to get a more powerful speaker.

But there may be some compatibility issues between the mixer and that speaker. You'd probably need to use RCA to RCA cables to connect the mixer to the speaker using the aux input. And you'd need an XLR to XLR cable to use the mic with the mic inputs on the mixer, as the mic currently has an XLR to 1/4" jack lead.
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Re: Adding reverb to a mobile speaker

Postby MarkPAman » Fri Dec 06, 2019 5:15 pm

Also, if the battery powered element is important to you, that complicates things further, as battery powered mixers are hard to find. :(
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Re: Adding reverb to a mobile speaker

Postby Guest » Fri Dec 06, 2019 5:31 pm

Yes it needs to be run on a mixer, the problem with a lot of the mixer I have seen they are AC input and not DC like most circuit boards (apparently it is something to do with the mic)
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Re: Adding reverb to a mobile speaker

Postby Wonks » Fri Dec 06, 2019 5:41 pm

Indeed. Especially ones with reverb, as DSP take a lot of current. meaning a short battery life.
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Re: Adding reverb to a mobile speaker

Postby CS70 » Fri Dec 06, 2019 5:49 pm

A short delay, mixed in low and with adequate feedback is often just as a good as a reverb, or better. But I guess your speaker doesn't have much control ?

A portable option is a vocal pedal inline with the mic, but of course it costs.. unless you find one second hand. Some old stuff from digitech etc do a decent enough job and often go for peanuts. The advantage is that some run on batteries like guitar pedals.

If it's ok to be wired, you could also look for old used hardware reverb units, they go sometimes for next to nothing. Alesis are great for that job - the Nanoverb is a classic, and I've just got myself an old Picoverb to use inline with headphones for recording singers who like to hear reverb and it costed me half very little.
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Re: Adding reverb to a mobile speaker

Postby Guest » Fri Dec 06, 2019 7:04 pm

I wonder if it would be safe to run an AC mixer from a DC battery then? Somewhere some one said they did not see a problem with it
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Re: Adding reverb to a mobile speaker

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Fri Dec 06, 2019 8:32 pm

tonyztigger wrote:I wonder if it would be safe to run an AC mixer from a DC battery then? Somewhere some one said they did not see a problem with it

Most electronic equipment runs internally on multiple DC supplies. That supply might come from batteries, but usually comes from a power unit which converts mains-AC into suitable DC voltages.

If your mixer only accepts an AC mains voltage input, and you want to run it from batteries, you'll need to use an 'inverter' which generates a mains AC voltage from a DC battery. There are different qualities of inverter... you'll need a good one to provide a quiet-enough supply for a mixer.

Some mixers are supplied with a wall-wart or line-lump mains power supply unit, which provides a lower voltage (or set of voltages) into the mixer. You need to be a bit careful here, as some WW and LL external supplies provide lower voltage AC, and some provide DC.

If the mixer expects a single DC voltage, you can probably use an external battery (of the appropriate voltage and capacity) directly. However, if it requires multiple DC voltages (such as +/-12V and +48V, for example) you're stuffed and will have to go back to the inverter solution. Likewise if it requires a low AC voltage.

So, while it is usually possible to find a way to power a mixer (or anything else) from a battery, you need to know what you're doing, else serious damage can be done!

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Re: Adding reverb to a mobile speaker

Postby Guest » Sat Dec 07, 2019 1:34 pm

Hugh Robjohns wrote:Most electronic equipment runs internally on multiple DC supplies. That supply might come from batteries, but usually comes from a power unit which converts mains-AC into suitable DC voltages.
That would be true for most domestic appliances that use a small load like a circuit board but not the case on heavier load such as washing machine motors and car alternators

Hugh Robjohns wrote:If your mixer only accepts an AC mains voltage input, and you want to run it from batteries, you'll need to use an 'inverter' which generates a mains AC voltage from a DC battery.
The problem with inverters is the cheaper ones that are readily available on the market at shops like Halfords and Screwfix are for big loads (the smallest one I saw was 75W) and use a lot of power (in heat) just to keep them running. Since our mixers use a very small current (about 20W) we are going to need to hump about a big battery just to run out inverter. I did happen to see a youtube video where someone used a car relay and a capacitor to make a very small inverter

The ideal situation hear would be to have a very small inverter that would be powered from my speaker battery as that is 12V like most inverters I have seen

Now regarding noise level. I do happen to have a 150W inverter and I can tell you that the closer you put any audio input wire (specially mic leads and even the mic its self) to the inverter the louder the hum you get on the out put speaker. But if I keep the audio wires separate from the electrical wire (which includes the mains adapter for the mixer too) noise level is not an issue
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