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New sound Technicians

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Re: New sound Technicians

Postby Hugh Robjohns » Tue Sep 15, 2020 3:34 pm

Arpangel wrote:I love being at sea, before Covid we were always going on cruises...

:lol: Being a paying customer on a holiday cruise is quite a different experience from serving on a ship in the Royal Navy or, indeed, the Merchant Navy!

And every single job I've ever done, or witnessed all have periods of relative tedious boredom... that's just life. You have to take the rough with the smooth, and learn to enjoy it all.
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Re: New sound Technicians

Postby zenguitar » Tue Sep 15, 2020 3:40 pm

For the OP. Live sound is an industry that has little interest in certificates and a lot of interest in experience. Also, no one starts in the industry as a sound tech, you could work years before you get anywhere near the mixing desk hands on.

Little that can be done while we are in covid lockdown. But once live music starts to happen again the best step you could take is to join a local crew, either for a large venue, or for a company that provides local crew to a number of venues.

It's not glamorous, it's hard physical work, but if you stick with it you will get two very valuable rewards. The first is experience on working on lots of shows with set, backline, monitors, lights, PA, rigging. You will start off unloading and loading trucks, building sets/stages, and unpacking flight cases. As you do more shows and learn more, you will be trusted to help build and rig light and sound systems, and (as I did during my decade of local crew work) you will eventually be trusted to do a lot of work unsupervised.

And that brings me to the second reward; the reason I was trusted to work unsupervised was because the touring crews keep coming back to the same venues and get to know the guys who can be trusted to learn and do as they're told. And when they meet a local crew they will ask for guys they know who can do the job. These people become your contacts and your network. And what is unusual about this industry is that many PA and Lighting company Directors enjoy going out on the road. At one point I had the business cards of directors of two top Music Business trucking companies in my wallet, because I mentioned to a driver that I was thinking about getting a heavy goods vehicle licence, and on each occasion the driver was a company director who had seen me working his truck on many occasions.

Andy :beamup:
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Re: New sound Technicians

Postby Mike Stranks » Tue Sep 15, 2020 3:40 pm

Sam Spoons wrote:
Arpangel wrote:Recording and engineering is a bit like your description of the sea, it’s mainly boring, unless to you get to the top in this case!
It’s satisfying when you do a good job though.

My experience of working for a living for the best part of 50 years was that most 'decent' jobs are 90% mundane and 10% interesting (for a certain definition of 'interesting')*. Sound engineering is definitely one of these. The work is mostly mundane and physical**, loading in the rig and flying half a ton of line array, running a multicore and 50 or so XLR cables, setting up the backline, and the lights (I hate lights...), dealing with the overinflated ego's of the headliners*** all falls into the 90% mundane (or even, just plain c*@p). But when you're standing behind the desk having some great craic at the soundcheck with a great band and mixing them during a great show, that's the 10% (though, in reality, it's probably more like 2%) that sustains you through the poorly paid 18 hour days of hard physical work, 'difficult' performers and 'girl band' managers.****

And if I had to highlight one skill, above all others, that the jobbing sound guy needs in spades it's 'people skills'. Performers are often nervous and stressed and how you deal with them will affect the way they treat you in return and can make or ruin your day, and theirs.

* As Arpy says, it's usually the people you work with that make it enjoyably or otherwise.

** Unless you have reached to point of having a team of roadies and riggers to do the 'dirty work'.

*** Not all (or even most) headliners have overinflated egos and not all support bands are humble souls...

**** And I still enjoyed my time working at the 'grass roots' (or muddy field more often than not) end of the business.

Couldn't have put it better myself. :thumbup: :clap:
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Re: New sound Technicians

Postby PapaGanush » Sat Sep 19, 2020 3:27 pm

The Red Bladder wrote:You seem determined to miss the point - sound tech is no longer a skill people are prepared to pay for. Having some certificate and being optimistic is not enough.

There are two ways to the top in the music biz - find your rising star before they have risen and try to hitch your waggon to theirs - or make brilliant and original music yourself. As Quincy Jones said, "The money's in the music."

You dont necessary need a star, the student before me for example bought his own PA system and started working independently in weddings! I appreciate sharing your 30++ experience in live Music industry but that is just good information to me I. Only 28 I have at least 30years of experience our planet is changing this pandemic is temporary new generation will rise and new technologies will tale over I will have my own experience to share!

I know I am not giving up I am temporary stuck but as soon as I see a work opportunity I will definitely enjoy it!
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Re: New sound Technicians

Postby PapaGanush » Sat Sep 19, 2020 3:38 pm

zenguitar wrote:For the OP. Live sound is an industry that has little interest in certificates and a lot of interest in experience. Also, no one starts in the industry as a sound tech, you could work years before you get anywhere near the mixing desk hands on.

Little that can be done while we are in covid lockdown. But once live music starts to happen again the best step you could take is to join a local crew, either for a large venue, or for a company that provides local crew to a number of venues.

It's not glamorous, it's hard physical work, but if you stick with it you will get two very valuable rewards. The first is experience on working on lots of shows with set, backline, monitors, lights, PA, rigging. You will start off unloading and loading trucks, building sets/stages, and unpacking flight cases. As you do more shows and learn more, you will be trusted to help build and rig light and sound systems, and (as I did during my decade of local crew work) you will eventually be trusted to do a lot of work unsupervised.

And that brings me to the second reward; the reason I was trusted to work unsupervised was because the touring crews keep coming back to the same venues and get to know the guys who can be trusted to learn and do as they're told. And when they meet a local crew they will ask for guys they know who can do the job. These people become your contacts and your network. And what is unusual about this industry is that many PA and Lighting company Directors enjoy going out on the road. At one point I had the business cards of directors of two top Music Business trucking companies in my wallet, because I mentioned to a driver that I was thinking about getting a heavy goods vehicle licence, and on each occasion the driver was a company director who had seen me working his truck on many occasions.

Andy :beamup:

Nice! Thank-you I will be working in a famous bar as soon as I get a call from my mentor and from there I will keep grinding day by day until I buy my own xr18 and a PA system so I can have extra gigs herr and there beside working regularly in same place
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