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Next step up from Mackie Onyx Blackjack??

All about the tools and techniques involved in capturing sound, in the studio or on location.

Re: Next step up from Mackie Onyx Blackjack??

Postby audio_jungle » Wed Sep 19, 2018 1:42 am

Jumpeyspyder wrote:Ideally as much treatment as possible!
That doesn't mean cover every surface in absorbant foam, but to anaylise the acoustic problems of your space and deal with each problem in turn.
most likely for an average room:-

Bass traps, mirror points (possibly including ceiling cloud), backwall absorption / diffusers/

Know of any books you would recommend on this topic?

Sounds like there is a science to it?!
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Re: Next step up from Mackie Onyx Blackjack??

Postby audio_jungle » Wed Sep 19, 2018 1:47 am

Ariosto wrote:Personally I think that for close miked VO/narration work you need some room treatment. Mostly duvets, hanging towels, sheets and blankets on as many reflective surfaces including desk top and glass windows and mirrors which will be quite effective. In other words, on any hard surface that may reflect the sound waves back into the mic. Put duvet(s) and blankets behind you and also behind the mic, to get as dry a sound as possible.

I have mentioned my PortaBooth Pro several times and no one has commented on it.

The whole concept of sound-proofing is somewhat foreign to me, as I often thing the end result is a muffled, unnatural end result?!

When I tried my PortaBooth Pro on a tripod stand it sorta sounded like that too.


Ariosto wrote:Then close miking at about 12-18 inches should give a very strong audio recording with minimum room noise. However, sounds from outside your room may still intrude and be a problem, so record when it is quiet (3.00am?) or when noise from roads and aircraft etc are at a minimum.

Instead of treating my entire hotel room, couldn't I just either use my PortaBooth Pro or make a box around my mic on broadcast arm using Auralex? Then maybe throw a blanket over my head?

In other words, contain the sound space to a small area versus treating a wide open space...


Ariosto wrote:Turn the gain up until you have the meters peaking at around -6 to -10dB (or a bit lower at -14dB if your voice sometimes gets too loud, or you can't control it well enough. Don't forget it's about voice/mic technique as much as anything else. (Peaks must not go above -3dB for commercial work, and I keep mine to about -4.5 dB overall).

So how do I learn that?
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Re: Next step up from Mackie Onyx Blackjack??

Postby audio_jungle » Wed Sep 19, 2018 1:52 am

Wonks wrote:When you turn up the gain a lot with a microphone, so that any voice sounds are louder in your ears than natural voice level, you end up hearing noise from the room - computer fans, air conditioning, background road noise, wind, etc. When listening with just your ears, your brain is very good at masking out these quiet sounds so you don't notice them until you specifically listen for them. Amplifying them brings the noise up to a level where it isn't filtered out by your brain.

Cool explanation. Makes sense!


Wonks wrote:Almost any audio interface will have a much better signal to noise ratio than the space you are in. You can of course simply try and speak louder, which then makes the background noise relatively quieter, but you can only do this a bit before your voice then sounds unnatural and 'shouty'.

True. Plus when I was recording last weekend, I wasn't sure if I was getting too close to the mic or had the gain too high and thus sounded "boomy", or if that was a good thing?


Wonks wrote:Which is why to start with you need a quiet space to record in, and why you then need to put acoustic treatment in the space to help reduce the amount of reflected sounds (which will have the effect of making the room a bit quieter) and reduce the effect the room is having on the sound of your recorded voice.

So as asked above, can I just build a tiny sound-treated cube around my head and mic, or do I need the larger open space treated?
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Re: Next step up from Mackie Onyx Blackjack??

Postby audio_jungle » Wed Sep 19, 2018 2:04 am

Sam Spoons wrote:I thought I'd linked this article in your other thread but if not here it is again. Describs exactly what you are trying to achieve. https://www.soundonsound.com/techniques/recording-voiceover-on-road

Thanks!
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Re: Next step up from Mackie Onyx Blackjack??

Postby Ariosto » Wed Sep 19, 2018 6:20 am

audio_jungle

I can't seem to view your PM. It won't come up when I click on it.
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Re: Next step up from Mackie Onyx Blackjack??

Postby Sam Spoons » Wed Sep 19, 2018 10:04 am

audio_jungle wrote:
True. Plus when I was recording last weekend, I wasn't sure if I was getting too close to the mic or had the gain too high and thus sounded "boomy", or if that was a good thing?

The closer to the mic you get the less the 'room' sound will affect your recording but, depending on the mic, getting very close (less than a few inches) and you will have proximity affect boosting the low end. This is very obvious within a couple of inches but can be tamed using eq as long as you keep the distance constant.

So as asked above, can I just build a tiny sound-treated cube around my head and mic, or do I need the larger open space treated?

The V/O artists in that article build a small 'booth' and work close to the mic. There shouldn't be any need to treat the rest of the room if the 'booth' is sufficiently effective but you will probably need to use a fairly aggressive HPF to avoid 'boxiness'.
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