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Very Nooby Queston about Jacks

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Very Nooby Queston about Jacks

Postby nvisibl » Fri Jan 04, 2019 3:44 am

I'm plugging a 3.5mm Heaphone Mic into a 1/4 Stereo Jack converter that's going into my Roland DJ-202 Mixing Console

The signal in my heaphones is scratchy and unclear.

It's only when I pull the 3.5mm jack out a little from the converter does it begin to sound okay.

At first \I thought it was the 1/4 Jack converter that was the issue but now i'm thinking it's because i'm plugging a Headphone MIC into it instead of Standard Headphones

Can someone knock it (me) on the head for me please before I go spend money on new heaphones. Which I think is a foregone conclusion anyway

thank you
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Re: Very Nooby Queston about Jacks

Postby Eddy Deegan » Fri Jan 04, 2019 5:35 am

Are you saying that the jack plug on the end of your headphone/mic is a TRRS connector that looks like the middle one in the below image?

Image

If not, disregard the below - but it would be useful to know exactly what the headset jack looks like to advise further.

If so, broadly speaking, using a stereo adapter should work, but the tolerances will be a little smaller and some adapters might not work so well with it.

When you pull out the mic jack slightly and the sound gets clearer, does the sound remain in stereo or go into something more mono-sounding? Sometimes pulling gently on plugs in adapters can result in the same signal being sent to both headphone channels.

I'd test it with some different headphones (any normal stereo ones) just to check that the signal comes out clean on those. You could also try a different adapter in case it is the adapter.

Do you use the mic on the headset with the DJ-202? If so, then you can probably find (or make) a breakout adapter to split the 3.5mm TRRS connector on the headset to a 1/4 stereo headphone jack + a 1/4 mono mic jack (as I see the DJ-202 has a 1/4 jack mic input).

If you don't use the mic then something like this should work: https://www.amazon.com/YCS-Smartphone-H ... B00MV2PDCA (it removes the mic signal and adapts to a standard stereo 3.5mm jack) although you'd still need to adapt the stereo 3.5mm jack to a 1/4 jack using your existing adapter.
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Re: Very Nooby Queston about Jacks

Postby nvisibl » Fri Jan 04, 2019 7:05 am

Thanks for taking the time to reply

It's the 3 stripped jack in the centre of the image

When i pull it out of the converter a bit..Quite a bit actually. 3/4 out. It plays clearly in stereo. But i need to hold it and not move lol

I'm just gonna go buy some standard headphones with a 1/4 jack that will go directly into the console

Though it would be good to know what the deal is with these headphone mic jacks
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Re: Very Nooby Queston about Jacks

Postby Eddy Deegan » Fri Jan 04, 2019 7:25 am

nvisibl wrote:Though it would be good to know what the deal is with these headphone mic jacks

Normal stereo headphone jacks are TRS (Tip/Ring/Sleeve). The Tip and the Ring carry the left and right signals, and the Sleeve is a common ground.

A TRRS jack, like you have on your mic headset, has an extra signal for the microphone.

You might find this article useful: http://www.circuitbasics.com/how-to-hac ... hone-jack/ as it provides further details on all the above.
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Re: Very Nooby Queston about Jacks

Postby ef37a » Fri Jan 04, 2019 9:15 am

New headphones would seem the best solution. Adaptors to "breakout" a TRRS jack on say a laptop to mic and headphones are readily available. To split out the TRRS connections of a headset seem rarer? Amazon had a suitable cable but no longer.

My son's Lenovo laptop has a TRRS jack but I found standard (AKG K92) headphones worked perfectly well.

There also seems to be a "tolerance creep" in some audio connectors? Jacks, XLRs, I read of isolated problems and I suggest the best answer is to buy from a reputable supplier and not go the cheapest route? But even that does not always guarantee precision!

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