You are here

Vox Microphone for ‘Screamo’ Music

For performing musicians and engineers: stagecraft, engineering and gear.

Re: Vox Microphone for ‘Screamo’ Music

Postby AlecSp » Fri Feb 21, 2020 7:49 pm

ef37a wrote:I have just seen that the OM7 has an even lower sensitivity than a 7b at 0.8mV/Pa. Maybe put a 10dB XLR slug in the mic cable and scream even louder?
I think you have a different idea about gain structure from the rest of us! ;-)
AlecSp
Regular
Posts: 462
Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2004 1:00 am

Re: Vox Microphone for ‘Screamo’ Music

Postby ef37a » Fri Feb 21, 2020 8:56 pm

AlecSp wrote:
ef37a wrote:I have just seen that the OM7 has an even lower sensitivity than a 7b at 0.8mV/Pa. Maybe put a 10dB XLR slug in the mic cable and scream even louder?
I think you have a different idea about gain structure from the rest of us! ;-)

Don't think so? I go way back with sound reinforcement and the 'critical distance'.
Sucking the mic and screaming is just a limiting condition of that. The 10dB pad stops the pre amp overloading but then I doubt the guy CAN scream any louder anyway!

Of course, if the vocal PA cannot put out enough SPL to overcome the band he is hissing in the wind. not coming anywhere near me are you OP? !!)

Dave.
ef37a
Jedi Poster
Posts: 12010
Joined: Mon May 29, 2006 12:00 am
Location: northampton uk

Re: Vox Microphone for ‘Screamo’ Music

Postby Klaus_UK » Fri Feb 21, 2020 11:30 pm

Tim Gillett wrote:
James Perrett wrote:If you've got a screaming vocalist who can't be heard with an SM58 then I'd say the problem isn't the microphone. Yes, an OM7 has a tighter pickup pattern but with a loud vocalist the SM58 should work.

Are you using compression or distortion on the vocals? If not used in the right way these can both reduce the gain before feedback. As already mentioned, the singer also needs a sensible microphone technique.

And lastly - is the PA loud enough to overcome the sound of the band?

This ^

I'm also guessing this has nothing to do with the microphone.

And if the band is that screamingly loud on its own, there's probably no headroom left anyway (in the audience's ears) for an even louder vocal.

But as so often with self diagnosed problems, posting a recording from the audience is probably better than" a thousand words". Give us what you're hearing... Your diagnosis that the problem is with the mic may be completely wrong.

I was not the engineer this night:
https://www.instagram.com/p/B81Rn1HnrHS ... yisfac64rz

As you’ll hear, the engineer has used all the headroom up making things far louder than they needed to be on the instrument front, leaving little for the vocals. However, even when in good hands (my hands) having a vocalist that likes the wrong side of the stage barrier and to use a microphone in that manner will still present a challenge.

The thing about small venues is that usually the PA and monitor situation only compounds whatever issue you may already have, so in asking for the best microphone for this solution I am just trying to give myself the best chance I can have in overcoming the unavoidable issues.

I have been engineering a long time now so am fully conversant with graphicing and the various other ways you can make things sound the best they can be when in a subpar room with subpar equipment, and do everything I can. But having the right microphone rather than the wrong one may help that extra % to get it as good as it can be.

So while I know everyone is well meaning with their advice on feedback management here, it’s not something I really need advice on. It’s instead just a case of picking the right tool for the job to give myself the best chance from the source.

I’ll do everything I can to make it sound good and I’m never one for making things loud for the sake of loud (unlike most bands and engineers in this genre), and part of that is selecting the right tool for the job.

And for Male rock vocalists in venues with challenging PA and such a scenario, the Audix OM7 does seem to be that right tool.
Klaus_UK
Poster
Posts: 11
Joined: Fri Sep 03, 2010 12:00 am

Re: Vox Microphone for ‘Screamo’ Music

Postby CS70 » Fri Feb 21, 2020 11:33 pm

Klaus_UK wrote:Yes, I’m aware of that and do what can be done to manage technique however ultimately the band are in charge so all I can is give myself the best chance through good microphone selection and then the rest is down to them.

I feel for you :)
User avatar
CS70
Jedi Poster
Posts: 6068
Joined: Mon Nov 26, 2012 1:00 am
Location: Oslo, Norway
Silver Spoon - Check out our latest video and the FB page

Re: Vox Microphone for ‘Screamo’ Music

Postby Sam Spoons » Sat Feb 22, 2020 12:43 am

Me too (if a bloke is allowed to say that...)..... :headbang:
User avatar
Sam Spoons
Jedi Poster
Posts: 13351
Joined: Thu Jan 23, 2003 1:00 am
Location: Manchester UK
Finally taking this recording lark seriously (and recording my Gypsy Jazz CD)........

Re: Vox Microphone for ‘Screamo’ Music

Postby Tim Gillett » Sat Feb 22, 2020 1:04 am

Thanks for the clip. It looks like most of the very high volume - in a small venue - is coming from the onstage amps and drums. No need to mic up those cabs! In that situation, as anyone on PA would be, it seems you are powerless. Rule # one, get the onstage volume down, but how would that sort of advice be received?
Tim Gillett
Frequent Poster (Level2)
Posts: 2212
Joined: Wed Jan 30, 2013 1:00 am
Location: Perth, Western Australia

Re: Vox Microphone for ‘Screamo’ Music

Postby Sam Spoons » Sat Feb 22, 2020 1:50 pm

Just watched the vid, at least he doesn't cup the mic......

Only listened on the Macbook speakers so far but I'd agree that the stage volume could come down a little. OTOH the balance seems not too far off the mark with the vocal fairly well down in the mix which is how I would mix it.
User avatar
Sam Spoons
Jedi Poster
Posts: 13351
Joined: Thu Jan 23, 2003 1:00 am
Location: Manchester UK
Finally taking this recording lark seriously (and recording my Gypsy Jazz CD)........

Previous