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Sonuscore The Orchestra

Sample Library
Published December 2017
By Nick Magnus

The main page with five articulations loaded. Slots one and four are assigned to envelopes 1 and 2 respectively; slots two, three and five are each assigned to a different arpeggiator.The main page with five articulations loaded. Slots one and four are assigned to envelopes 1 and 2 respectively; slots two, three and five are each assigned to a different arpeggiator.

Sonuscore’s new library takes an unusual and inventive approach to the sampled orchestra.

With a name like The Orchestra, it might be tempting to dismiss this as just yet another orchestral sample library; however, that would be missing out on something quite special. In fact I’ve found it quite hard to stop playing with The Orchestra and actually start writing this review.

First off, I should explain what it is not. It’s not a deeply sampled, highly detailed rendering of every possible articulation of every possible orchestral instrument, recorded in some swish Hollywood studio in umpteen mic positions. At a mere 6GB in size that would be expecting a bit much. What it does manage to squeeze into that relatively small footprint are the essential components of an orchestra, with just enough articulations to cover the most commonly needed performance variations. These instruments are presented as playable patches, but they serve a greater purpose: The Orchestra Engine. Users of phrase-based sample libraries such as the Sonokinetic range (Minimal, Tutti, Capriccio, etc) or Native Instruments’ Action Strings will be familiar with the concept: real, pre-recorded musical phrases or rhythmic patterns that conform to the chords you play on a keyboard. However, the content of those phrases always remains the same. What if you could make your own content? That’s what The Orchestra Engine is all about. The main difference is that there are no pre-recorded phrases in this...

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Published December 2017